A half century of tremendous population and economic growth in Georgia has resulted in new challenges regarding water quality and quantity, air quality and traffic-related emissions. Utilizing objective facts, a commonsense, market-oriented approach to land-use and environmental policy encourages local action and private initiative to improve environmental conditions and ensure our quality of life for future generations.

Water Policy-makers Flooded with Proposals and Solutions

By Benita M. Dodd

The first thing to know about Georgia’s water worries is that just as Washington doesn’t have a revenue problem but a spending problem, Georgia doesn’t have a water supply problem but a water storage problem. And with…

Legislative Policy Briefing Brings Free-Market Experts to Georgia

By Benita M. Dodd

The free-market think tanks that focus on state policy issues often exchange and replicate their successful ideas and case studies in effective government. Reinventing the wheel to implement each issue in each state is unproductive and inefficient,…

Environmental Gobbledygook, Economic Gridlock

By Benita M. Dodd

Which is the environmentally sound approach, policy-makers seeing job creation as the key to economic recovery or environmental groups pushing for stringent prohibitions on interbasin transfers in Georgia? It may seem like a no-brainer, but even for…

Land Protection Through Private Alternatives

By Jefferson G. Edgens

Governor Barnes should be commended for his proposal to protect 20 percent of open space. Not only is this a good idea, but it stresses two important points: local governments decide what areas to…

Whither Your Weather Depends on Station Location

By Benita M. Dodd

For years, Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International and Chicago’s O’Hare airports have competed for the title of nation’s busiest airport. Last year, Atlanta won. As the official temperature stations for their respective cities, however, it seems the two airports…

Removing the Political Shortage of Water

By H. Sterling Burnett and Ross Wingo

About 82 percent of Americans receive drinking water via publicly owned water systems, according to the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Many of these municipal and regional systems operate at a loss, meaning…

Fault Feds, not Atlanta, for Lanier’s Woes

By Chick Krautler

Today, Lake Lanier is more than 13 feet below its full pool and nearly 10 feet lower than it was this time last year. The state climatologist sees the next few weeks as critical in determining the extent…

Planning Regional Water Planning Councils

By Brant D. Keller, Ph.D.

In the 2008 legislative session, four years after the passage of HB 237, the “Comprehensive Statewide Water Management Planning Act,” state lawmakers approved the framework for the Comprehensive Statewide Water Plan. As part of the plan,…

A Kind Cut

In an editorial published March 28, 2008, Investor’s Business Daily declares, “It would be a shame” if Georgia lawmakers go home without giving their constituents tax relief. “Georgia has the chance to be an island of sanity,” Investor’s Business Daily…

Solutions for Georgia’s 1.7 Million Uninsured

By Ronald E. Bachman

An unprecedented collaboration of associations representing hospitals, physicians, insurers and sales agents, convened in late 2007 with a goal of developing solutions for the estimated 1.7 million uninsured residents of Georgia. The recommendations of this Georgia Uninsured…

Land Use Principles for Georgia

The Lone Mountain Compact’s “Principles for Livable Cities,” to which the Georgia Public Policy Foundation is a signatory, form the basis of land use principles:

Absent a material threat to other individuals or the community, people should be allowed to live…

Wising Up to Georgia’s Water Woes

By Benita M. Dodd and Harold Brown

“It is remarkable how many political ‘solutions’ today are dealing with problems created by previous political ‘solutions’,” conservative commentator Thomas Sowell wrote recently on the fires in Southern California. Sowell could have been talking…

Good Intentions on Road to Energy Hell

By Kenneth P. Green

It is rare that one finds a policy concept that unites policy-makers not only of the left and right, but between countries, particularly, these days, in the contentious field of energy policy. But there is such…

Eminent Domain Protection’s No Done Deal

 

By Jason Pye 

This month marks the second anniversary of the infamous Kelo v. New London decision, a case where the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the taking of private property (the practice known as eminent domain) from an individual…

Water: Balloons, Guns, Slides in Policy

By Benita M. Dodd 

Don’t like the drought-related watering restrictions in your community? Outraged enough to rat out neighbors who violate watering rules? The state’s water “wars” could get worse: Watch out for the initial draft of the Statewide Water Management…

Border Security is First Step in Halting Illegal Immigration

By Senator Johnny Isakson

When I was running for Senate in 2004, illegal immigration was second only to the war on terror on the list of issues folks asked me about on the campaign trail. In the two years I’ve served…

Video Franchising and the Costly Lesson of Branch Banking

By Kelly McCutchen

Tired of slow downloads, limited access to broadband, high prices or poor service? You should be concerned. Georgia could easily lose out on billions of dollars of vital investment in telecommunications infrastructure if this state fails…

Laying the groundwork for major fiscal reform

By Kelly McCutchen

With more than a half-billion-dollar budget surplus and a booming stock market, Georgia’s economic future looks bright. Of course, things looked bright in the late 1990s, too.

Trying to gauge the economy 12-18 months into the future is difficult,…

Facts Not Fear on Air Pollution

By Joel Schwartz

Air pollution has been declining for decades across the United States, yet most Americans still believe air pollution is a growing problem and a serious threat to their health. The reason: Most information on air pollution from environmentalists,…

Testimony of Kelly McCutchen, Executive Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation before the Georgia Senate Regulated Industries Committee

October 19, 2006

We believe that a statewide video franchise law is critical to Georgia’s future. Telecommuting, telemedicine, virtual schools and other high tech advances hold great promise for a large, rural state like Georgia, but to take full advantage of these technologies…