Tag: Student Achievement

By Benita M. Dodd The Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s 25th Anniversary Celebration Dinner and Freedom Award takes place on November 11 at the Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre and is keynoted by John Stossel. Through the years, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation has presented the prestigious Freedom Award to a notable Georgian who has exemplified the principles of private enterprise and personal integrity. Previous recipients include U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, Flowers Industries chairman emeritus William Flowers, the former U.S. Attorney General Griffin Bell, Chick-fil-A founder Truett Cathy; Deen Day Smith, chair of the Cecil B. Day Investment Company; former Governor and United States Senator Zell Miller; former Southern Company president Bill Dahlberg, Medal of Honor recipient General Raymond… View Article

Friday Facts: June 3, 2016

It’s Friday! Events  Monday, June 6: “The Politics of School Choice” is a Leadership Breakfast keynoted by national education expert Jay Greene and sponsored by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Education Economics Center at Kennesaw State University. 7:30 a.m., Room 278, Burruss Building, Kennesaw State University. Parking available in the visitors’ lot. $20 includes event and Chick-fil-A breakfast. Register online here.  Also on June 6, Dr. Greene’s 9:30-10:45 a.m. lecture, “The Foolishness of Trying to Regulate Our Way to School Improvement,” is open to the public. Burruss Building, Room 151. Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, 358,333 Georgians were on welfare (AFDC), compared… View Article

Does More Money Improve Outcomes?

Fifty years ago, James S. Coleman published a groundbreaking education report that many call the fountainhead for those committed to evidence-based education policy. Among other things, Coleman found that variations in per-pupil expenditure had little correlation with student outcomes. Even to this day, there remains the simple question as to whether, other things equal, just adding more money to schools will systematically lead to higher achievement. Figure 2 shows the overall record of states during the past quarter century. Changes in real state spending per pupil are uncorrelated with changes in 4th-grade student achievement in reading. Similar results are obtained in math and in both math and reading at the 8th-grade level. Clearly, states have changed in many other ways… View Article

Extending the REACH of Academic Achievement

By Benita M. Dodd Education activists watched in dismay as education reform proposals were swept under the rug once again at the Gold Dome in 2016 before legislators rushed home to begin campaigning. Across the state, however, as graduation ceremonies approach, one reform begun in 2012 is providing hope: REACH Georgia scholarships. REACH Georgia (Realizing Educational Achievement Can Happen) was launched in 2012 by Gov. Nathan Deal as a privately funded, needs-based mentorship and scholarship program based in Georgia’s public schools. Now it’s a public-private partnership; since 2015, the Legislature has appropriated $2 million for the program; for 2017, the amount is $2.75 million. “We’re not looking for the merit scholar,” says Joy Hawkins, director of business development for the… View Article

Friday Facts: April 8, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, metro Atlanta’s peak-hour congestion delays averaged 35 hours per commuter and the cost averaged $725. By 2014 (latest data) the cost was $1,130 per commuter for 52 hours of delay annually. The good news? The number of commuters increased 66 percent, the cost of delay grew 55 percent but congestion increased “only” 49 percent. We’re making a dent! Source: Texas Transportation Institute  Quotes of Note  “The property which every man has in his own labor, as it is the original foundation of all other property, so it is the most sacred and inviolable. The patrimony of a poor man lies in the strength… View Article
By Kelly McCutchen Georgia and the rest of the country are experiencing a significant demographic change: We’re seeing more grandparents and children, with fewer folks in between. The Census Bureau projects that Georgia’s elderly population will nearly double between 2010 and 2030. Meanwhile, the number of children ages 5-17 is predicted to rise by 26 percent. This shift will place a serious strain on a decreasing percentage of working-age adults. Georgia has one of the most generous retirement exclusions for income tax purposes in the nation ($130,000 per couple) and, in many counties, those over 65 are exempted from school taxes. So Georgia’s anticipated 1 million-plus increase of retirement-age residents will be particularly significant as state and local budgets struggle… View Article
The Foundation for Excellence in Education distributed this news release today. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 10, 2016 Contact: 850.391.4090/PressShop@ExcelinEd.org GEORGIA: AT THE INTERSECTION OF EDUCATION AND AGING Research Report by ExcelinEd Highlights How Demographic Changes Will Challenge Georgia’s Public Education System Today, at the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, Dr. Matthew Ladner of the Foundation for Excellence in Education released original research on the demographic challenges facing Georgia’s education budget, entitled “At the Intersection of Education and Aging: Baby Boomer Retirement, Student Enrollment Growth and the Future of Georgia Education.” The analysis contains both research on the demographic challenges facing Georgia and strategies for substantially improving the academic quality of the state’s K-12 schools at a price taxpayers can afford.… View Article

At the Intersection of Education and Aging

Registration is open for, “At the Inter$ection of Education and Aging,” an 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast on Thursday, March 10, 2016. Hosted by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation at Cobb County’s Georgian Club, the event speaker is Dr. Matt Ladner, Senior Advisor for the Foundation for Excellence in Education.  Ladner will unveil his original research and analysis on the demographic challenges facing state education budgets, including Georgia’s, and strategies for substantially improving the academic quality of the state’s K-12 schools at a price taxpayers can afford. Dr. Matthew Ladner is the Senior Advisor of Policy and Research for the Foundation for Excellence in Education. He has written numerous studies on school choice, charter schools and special education reform… View Article
NEWS RELEASE For Immediate Release February 17, 2016  Contact: Benita Dodd benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org or 404-256-4050 March 10 Event: ‘At the Inter$ection of Education and Aging’ Atlanta – Registration is open for, “At the Inter$ection of Education and Aging,” an 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast hosted by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation on Thursday, March 10, 2016, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. The speaker is Dr. Matt Ladner, Senior Advisor of Policy and Research for the Foundation for Excellence in Education. Ladner will unveil his original research and analysis on the demographic challenges facing state education budgets, including Georgia’s, and strategies for substantially improving the academic quality of the state’s K-12 schools at a price taxpayers can afford. Ladner has written… View Article
Kenneth Artz of the Heartland Institute interviewed Foundation Senior Fellow Ben Scafidi on  the Georgia Education Reform Commission’s recommendations. The article is below; access the article on Heartrland’s Web site here: http://news.heartland.org/newspaper-article/2016/02/10/georgia-commission-releases-reform-recommendations Georgia Commission Releases Reform Recommendations By Kenneth Artz A Georgia government commission released a report in December 2015 detailing recommended reforms lawmakers should consider during the recently convened legislative session. The commission called on the state’s legislature to fund charter schools in a more equitable manner and provide more support for districts wishing to explore tying teachers’ pay to student performance. The commission was composed of private-sector leaders, local and state education officials, and lawmakers. The stated goal of the Georgia Education Reform Commission is to “[provide]… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has been doing important work for the free enterprise movement for the past 20 years.  I can assure you from the vantage of a non-profit think tank in Washington, D.C. with much the same principles as GPPF that the work we do simply would not be possible if it were not for the important work that GPPF does.  We see it, we understand it, it is an inspiration to us, it is the kind of thing that will translate into the important work that we can do in Washington, D.C.  We thank you very much for that.

Arthur Brooks, President, American Enterprise Institute (2011) more quotes