Tag: Medicare

Checking Up On Health: August 19, 2014

Health Policy News and Views Compiled By Benita M. Dodd Several friends have raved about the healing/soothing/therapeutic/calming/antidepressant benefits of essential oils, but I’m still not buying them. (Although, if you want to give me some, I’ll gladly try them!) I would love to hear from readers about their experiences, but truth be told, I’m as skeptical about the multilevel marketers’ claims regarding these costly essential oils as I am about the overrated cures that some chiropractors promise. There, I put it out there. And then there’s Whole Foods Market. I was reading about the Affordable Care Act on Forbes.com when up popped a story titled, “The Three Dumbest Things About Whole Foods Market.” If there’s one thing I’m… View Article

Friday Facts: August 15, 2014

It’s Friday! An important reminder: We want you to continue to receive our updates! To ensure that you receive Foundation e-mails, please add us to your address book or safe list. Events Aug. 28: “Unaccountable Government in Action: Capital Markets in the Fed’s Cross-Hairs” is the Foundation’s noon Policy Briefing Luncheon at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. Former SEC Commissioner Paul S. Atkins and the American Enterprise Institute’s Peter Wallison discuss the dangerous regulatory expansion of the Dodd-Frank Act. $30. For more information and to register, go to http://www.georgiapolicy.org/?p=13956. Sept. 19: Register now to reserve your seat at the 2014 Georgia Legislative Policy Forum. Talk show host and former presidential candidate Herman Cain is one of the… View Article

Checking Up On Health: July 22, 2014

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd In case you missed it: There were two rulings today regarding the Affordable Care Act. In the biggest ruling yet to affect ObamaCare, a District of Columbia appeals court panel ruled 2-1 in Halbig v. Burwell that the Obama administration and the Internal Revenue Service were wrong in extending subsidies to enrollees in federally run health exchanges. This is critical because 36 states decided not to establish a state exchange. Without the subsidies, health care is suddenly not so “affordable” to millions. Congratulations to Cato Institute’s Michael Cannon (read his Forbes article on the significance of this ruling) and his colleague, Jonathan Adler, for establishing the foundation for this… View Article

Friday Facts: July 18, 2014

It’s Friday!  Quotes of Note “For nearly 40 years, it’s pretty much been all reform, all the time for the nation’s public school students, teachers, and parents. Many of the children whose schools were supposed to be revolutionized by America 2000 in 1990 now have the chance to see their own children’s education revolutionized by Common Core. Nothing can stop the impulse to reform our nation’s public schools. For professional policymakers, it is the itch they just can’t scratch.” – Andrew Ferguson “Today many people in America slavishly devote themselves to a political party without engaging in critical analysis of whether the philosophies of that party are really in sync with their true values and with the betterment of their… View Article

Checking Up On Health: July 15, 2014

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd Don’t believe the middleman makes a huge difference in health care? Listen carefully the next time you’re at the doctor. I’ve become a believer in direct primary care. It’s a little like a health club membership, where you sign an agreement to use the facility’s services. Unlike the elite concierge doctors of the USA Network show, “Royal Pains,” this affordable model is also called “concierge care for the little guy.” The difference health insurance makes in the price point was reinforced after my recent visit to an imaging center. The assistant offered me the option to file a health insurance claim or pay $130 up front. My plan… View Article

Checking Up On Health: June 24, 2014

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd My pet peeve when I visit the doctor’s office is waiting. I arrive on time. Then I wait. I don’t touch the magazines – I mean, sick people visit the doctor’s office! I play with the iPad. I text. I attempt to diagnose patients’ ailments and personalities. Most of all, I seethe. I know that if I made the doctor wait for me, I’d lose my place in line and they wouldn’t accommodate me. And if I didn’t turn up at all, they’d charge me for the missed appointment. Making me wait, I feel, is a sign of disrespect and disregard for my time. Is my time not worth money,… View Article

Checking Up On Health: June 17, 2014

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd I’m lucky enough to have a window office in a business complex that includes a dialysis center, a Lasik surgery center and a cosmetic surgery center. As I like to say, you can walk through the complex and get your eyes fixed and your nose fixed before you stop by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation here to get your philosophy fix … Needless to say, I see my fair share of ambulances, sometimes dropping off or picking up, but quite often racing in with lights flashing. I never know what’s gone wrong. But physicians do know what can go wrong. Which is why this blog entry by Patrick Hsu,… View Article

Checking Up On Health: May 20, 2014

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd Georgia’s engaged hospitals: Kudos to Georgia’s Tanner Medical Center in Villa Rica, which ranks 46th on the list of 100 top hospitals for patient engagement in the inaugural National Patient Engagement Ranking by Becker’s Hospital Review and Axial Exchange. Tanner scored 78 out of 100. Emory University Hospital (Atlanta) scored 74.3and came in 89th. The national ranking evaluated all 3,077 U.S. hospitals’ engagement efforts based on an analysis of publicly available data, including readmissions, patient satisfaction and the extent to which organizations offered information and tools that help engage patients in self care. Telemedicine: ABC News on Monday night had a report on “a brand-new high-tech medical service called… View Article

Checking Up On Health: May 6, 2014

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd Good news, bad news: Merck & Co. has agreed to buy rival  Schering-Plough Corp. for $41.1 billion, just six weeks over Pfizer announced it is buying Wyeth for $68 billion and even as Roche Holding AG finalizes its purchase of the remaining shares of Genentech Inc. The Wall Street Journal calls it “the latest attempt by pharmaceutical companies to diversify as they seek to weather the recession and cope with the unpredictability of drug development.” The good news is they’ll survive. The bad news is it means less pharmaceutical R&D. The newspaper puts it this way: “The pace of drug discovery has since slowed amid tougher regulatory scrutiny, and… View Article

Checking Up On Health: April 22, 2014

Health Policy News and Views Compiled By Benita M. Dodd Happy Earth Day! Isn’t it a great place to be?! I visited my longtime physician for my (kind of) annual physical this week. This is the pout I shared on Facebook afterward:   Story time, children: My arm has been hurting for a while – I think it’s tendinitis – so I decided to schedule my annual physical and kill two birds with one stone.  After waiting an hour past my appointment time to see the doctor today, she comes in.  “Hold on. I need to check with the desk what kind of exam we’re doing.”  Comes back and does a cursory exam — reflexes, ears, throat, chest.  “You’re good.… View Article

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