Tag: long-term care

Guide to the Issues: Long-Term Care

Principles Long-term care programs should be reserved for Georgia’s most vulnerable populations. Long-term care programs should be designed to avoid “crowding out” private solutions and personal responsibility. Recommendations Seek ways to target publicly funded long-term care (LTC) services to the neediestGeorgians. Middle-class and affluent people should prepay for care or repay from their estates. Now that the maintenance-of-effort restriction in the Affordable Care Act has expired, Medicaid LTC eligibility criteria should be tightened as much as possible under federal law so as to avoid “crowding out” private sources of LTC financing and encourage a privately financed home- and community-based services infrastructure. Seek waivers to eliminate or severely reduce the home equity exemption under Medicaid from its current level of $536,000… View Article

Long-Term Care (LTC)

Georgia faces multi-faceted long-term care problems including: A rapidly increasing elderly population Higher numbers of recipients with disabilities or dementia A Medicaid program already strained as the principal LTC payer Dependence on funding from the heavily indebted federal government State revenues constrained by recessionary pressures and limited future economic prospects Very little private financing of LTC to relieve the budgetary pressure on public programs Heavy public dependency on social programs and a growing “entitlement mentality” among the citizenry LTC is expensive whether received in a nursing home, an assisted living facility or in one’s own home.[1] The risk of needing some form of long-term care after age 65 is 69%.[2] The catastrophic risk of needing five years or… View Article

Government Role in Long-Term Care: It’s Getting Old

By Stephen A. Moses The single biggest expense senior citizens face is long-term care. The risks and cost are huge: a 20 percent chance they’ll need five years or more, with costs of $181 per day for a nursing home in Georgia. Yet few Georgians worry or plan for long-term care. Only 3.5 percent of Georgians over age 40 own private insurance; the national average is 4.5 percent. Why don’t they? The answer is surprising. Most frail or infirm elderly Georgians don’t pay for their own long-term care. In fact, expensive long-term care in Georgia is financed mostly by the state and federal government through Medicaid, a means-tested public assistance program. Georgia Medicaid spent a billion dollars on long-term care… View Article
GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION NEWS RELEASE For Immediate Release December 3, 2013 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Foundation Releases Study on Long-Term Care in Georgia State Can’t Afford to Modify a ‘Broken System,’ Study Concludes Atlanta – Georgia needs to reduce dependency on public programs and attract more private revenue if it is to survive the state’s coming long-term care crisis, according to a study released today by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation.  Conducted for the Foundation by Stephen Moses, president of the Center for Long-Term Care Reform, the study examined Medicaid and long-term care financing in Georgia. Long-term care is defined as, “custodial or medical assistance needed for three months or more due to an inability to… View Article

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