Tag: light rail

Do Governments Underplay Buses, Favor Rail?

In an editorial below from Transportation Reviews  that was published online in March 2016, author David A. Hensher opines on, “Why is Light Rail Starting to Dominate Bus Rapid Transit Yet Again?” Read the full text here: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01441647.2016.1155851. Below are some excerpts that are relevant to Georgia governments in making sensible choices among transit modes. This highlight sums up his viewpoint:  “The value for money proposition should deliver the best outcome for society regardless of whether it is rail or bus based, in their light and heavy configuration.” Almost weekly, we see proposals to build light rail in many cities, and Australian cities are no exception. It is also quite marked how absent any serious consideration of… View Article

Transit Tall Tales and Coping With Too Much Money

According to pro-rail transit Metro magazine, American cities face a dilemma: The demand for rail transit continues to grow, yet there is a scarcity of federal dollars to pay for it. In fact, most of the things the article says are wrong or, at least, they indicate that cities have too much money, not a shortage. If it weren’t for this surfeit of funds, cities wouldn’t plan ridiculously expensive rail lines that, in most cases, do nothing for transit riders or transportation users in general. This is shown by all of the examples in the Metro article. Los Angeles’ Westside Subway will be less than four miles long yet is expected to cost well over $2.8 billion, or more… View Article

Friday Facts: September 5, 2014

Friday Facts September 5, 2014 It’s Friday! Thursday, September 11, is the anniversary of the 2001 terrorist attacks that forever changed this nation. Aaron Maclean wrote recently for the Washington Free Beacon about his visit to the 9/11 Museum and the artifact that encapsulated it for him: “Jules, this is Brian. Listen, I’m on an airplane that’s been hijacked. If things don’t go well, and it’s not looking good, I just want you to know I absolutely love you, I want you to do good, go have good times, same to my parents and everybody, and I just totally love you, and I’ll see you when you get there. Bye, babe. I hope I call you.” Quotes of Note “Under… View Article
In his Policy Analysis for the Cato Institute released June 3, 2014, Randal O’Toole questions the motives of rail advocates who are willing to support high-cost, low-capacity rail transit, noting: “Supporters of low-capacity lines are not truly interested in transportation; supporters of high-cost lines are not truly interested in urban efficiencies.” The Worst of Both: The Rise of High-Cost, Low-Capacity Rail Transit Executive Summary By Randal O’Toole Most new rail transit lines in the United States and around the world are either light rail, including lines that sometimes run in or cross city streets, or heavy rail, which are built in exclusive rights of way, usually elevated or in subways. Heavy rail costs far more to build than light rail,… View Article

Making a Brave Move on the Transportation Front

By Baruch Feigenbaum  The announcement that the Atlanta Braves are abandoning Turner Field in downtown Atlanta for a location in the suburbs was a shock to almost everybody. There are many questions that must be answered, most important among them being how much of the $302 million in “public” funding will come from Cobb County taxpayers.   Assuming the Braves do move to Cobb, the county and the Braves will have to tackle the traffic nightmare that is I-285 and I-75. The Braves were unhappy with Turner Field, in part, because of insufficient nearby parking and poor freeway access. Congested traffic was the No. 1 reason fans did not attend games. And while leaving the heart of Atlanta and nearby MARTA… View Article

Friday Facts: August 9, 2013

August 9, 2013  It’s Friday! Congratulations to the winners of tickets to the Heartland Institute’s Emerging Forum: Lynda Whitt Chapman, Jeffrey Cole Copeland and Heather Moody Breeden.  Events August 15: Just 25 seats remain for the Heartland Institute’s Emerging Issues Forum, the national organization’s annual daylong event for elected officials, policy analysts and government affairs professionals to confer and strategize about the top public policy issues of the day. It’s in Atlanta this year! Among the topics: Health Care, Education, Tax Reform and Energy. The Foundation will participate in an energy roundtable discussion. Find out more and register at http://eif.heartland.org/. August 28: Register now for “Georgia Transportation: The Next Frontier,” a noon Policy Briefing Luncheon at the… View Article

Friday Facts: August 2, 2013

August 2, 2013  It’s Friday! Win with words: The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is giving away four tickets, valued at $100 each, to attend the Heartland Institute’s Emerging Issues Forum at the Capital City Club in Atlanta on Thursday, August 15. For a chance to win a ticket to the daylong session, tell your Facebook friends what you like about the Foundation and why. (Be sure you “like” the Foundation Facebook page and tag us in your post or share it on our page!) We’ll announce four winners in the Friday Facts next week, so make your case by noon on Thursday, August 8. Remember, if you don’t tag us, the NSA will be able to see you but View Article

Rail’s No Way In or To San Jose

By Benita M. Dodd For those who love to watch the passing parade – and have the time and inclination – few places are better than the sardine can that is a train. That’s why, once one neglects to make a timely reservation on any of the popular 30-minute, $40 road shuttle services between San Francisco and San Jose, the $7.50 Caltrain ticket becomes an enticing option. Once. For 90 minutes in a nearly empty doubledecker car, you have the unique opportunity to eavesdrop on loud cell phone conversations; watch the Webcam conversation on the laptop beneath you; follow in fascination as a wannabe chef creates and devours a strawberry shortcake before your very eyes, or gaze out a grimy… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is something that I am proud to be a part of today. The research conducted by education groups like yours is invaluable in helping form opinions and allowing people to reach conclusions that ultimately help them make the right decisions.

Dan Amos, CEO, AFLAC more quotes