Tag: Kelly McCutchen

Friday Facts: August 19, 2016

It’s Friday!  Events  August 22: The registration deadline is today! Sign up now to attend, “Across the Pond: A Policy Update,” the Foundation’s noon Policy Briefing Luncheon at Cobb County’s Georgian Club on Monday, August 22. The keynote speaker is British Consul General Jeremy Pilmore-Bedford. $35. Information here; register online here. Then and now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was founded, Georgia charter school enrollment was non-existent. Today (2015) there are 325,808 Georgia students enrolled in charter schools. The Foundation celebrates 25 years in Georgia in 2016. All year, we’re marking our milestone anniversary with a “Then and Now” Friday Facts category! Quotes of Note  “Far more important than… View Article

Friday Facts: July 29, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, the Georgia Dome was under construction. When completed in 1992 at a cost of $214 million ($361 million in 2016 dollars), it was one of the largest state-funded construction projects in state history. Twenty-five years later, it’s scheduled for demolition. The $1.6 billion Mercedes Benz football stadium under construction gets at least $200 million (and by some estimates, up to $600 million) in public subsidies.  Follow us! This week the Foundation hit a milestone: 3,000 Facebook “likes!” Our Twitter account has 1,650 followers at twitter.com/gppf. Follow us on Instagram, too! Guide to the Issues 2016: What policies should… View Article

Friday Facts: July 22, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, we polled Georgia voters on the state’s budget and economy. “Among the changes they strongly support are: privatization, spending cuts and limits, term limitations, creation of strict ethics laws and creation of direct citizen initiative and referendum.” Twenty-five years later, we continue to work diligently on the fiscal issues important to Georgians. Follow us! The Foundation is almost at 3,000 Facebook “likes!” Our Twitter account has 1,644 followers at twitter.com/gppf. Follow us on Instagram, too! Guide to the Issues 2016: What policies should Georgia adopt on education? Find out the Foundation’s proposals for Georgia’s children. Learn more about… View Article

Friday Facts: July 15, 2016

It’s Friday! Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, we urged in the LaGrange Daily News: “We must free parents to choose the school their child will attend. It should be obvious that parents, not government, know what is best for their children.” Twenty-five years later, resistance to school choice continues. Follow us! The Foundation is just eight shy of 3,000 Facebook “likes!” Our Twitter account has 1,641 followers at twitter.com/gppf. Follow us on Instagram, too! Guide to the Issues 2016: Find out what the Foundation proposes on issues such as transportation, health care, education, taxes and more. Currently available online, each chapter includes principles for reform, facts… View Article

Friday Facts: July 8, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, the Legislature approved a constitutional amendment designating lottery funds for education purposes. Voters ratified it in 1992 and the lottery began in 1993. Over the years, the Georgia Lottery Corp. reports generating more than $17.4 billion for education. Tonight’s Mega Millions jackpot is $540 million; the pot has rolled over since March. Guide to the Issues 2016: Find out what the Foundation proposes on issues such as transportation, health care, education, taxes and more. Currently available online, each chapter includes principles for reform, facts on the issue, background information and, in most cases, positive solutions to the challenges facing Georgia.  Quotes of Note View Article

Expand Access to Care, Not Medicaid

By Kelly McCutchen Those addressing Georgia’s uninsured and failing hospitals seem stuck between two options: expanding a government program (Medicaid) with its own long list of challenges, or doing nothing. It’s a false choice. Expanding Medicaid is undoubtedly the worst option for providing more Georgians access. For providers – even with more money from the federal government – Medicaid still pays less than their cost. It’s a bad deal for taxpayers: Expansion is estimated to cost more than $7,000 for able-bodied adults; the current Medicaid program spends $3,022. If Georgia’s more than 200,000 low-income adults who already have private insurance opt for the “free” program, the cost will be even higher. It’s also a bad deal for recipients. A study… View Article

Friday Facts: June 24, 2017

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, the highest monthly average residential price of natural gas (August) was $7.36 per thousand cubic feet. Between then and now, the price climbed as high as $20.77 (July 2008); yet in January this year it was down to $8.30 per 1,000 cubic feet. We’re giving credit to new domestic shale discoveries and innovative fracking technology. Guide to the Issues 2016: Find out what the Foundation proposes on issues such as transportation, health care, education, taxes and more. Currently available online, each chapter includes principles for reform, facts on the issue, background information and, in most cases, positive solutions to the challenges facing Georgia. … View Article

Friday Facts: June 17, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, electronic messages were hardly the norm; the term “email” gained popularity by 1993. Today, According to the Harvard Business Review, email takes up 23 percent of the average employee’s workday and, collectively, we send more than 108 billion emails a day in the United States. Guide to the Issues 2016, compiled by the Foundation, is now available online. Each chapter includes principles for reform, facts on the issue, background information and, in most cases, positive solutions to the challenges facing Georgia.  Quotes of Note  “The laws that forbid the carrying of arms are laws of such a nature. They disarm only those… View Article
The Savannah Morning News edition of June 12, 2016 published a commentary by Georgia Public Policy Foundation President Kelly McCutchen criticizing Savannah’s plans to consider city-owned broadband. The link is here; the commentary is published below in in its entirety. Kelly McCutchen: City-owned broadband a bad idea Last month, the city of Savannah issued a request for proposal (RFP) seeking a company to evaluate the state of broadband services available in the city and to develop a strategic plan that will address any current gaps in service. The RFP says the plan to address gaps should include ideas for public-private partnerships or outline “various business models for municipal broadband delivery.” That phrase makes it clear that officials in Savannah… View Article

Friday Facts: June 3, 2016

It’s Friday! Events  Monday, June 6: “The Politics of School Choice” is a Leadership Breakfast keynoted by national education expert Jay Greene and sponsored by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Education Economics Center at Kennesaw State University. 7:30 a.m., Room 278, Burruss Building, Kennesaw State University. Parking available in the visitors’ lot. $20 includes event and Chick-fil-A breakfast. Register online here.  Also on June 6, Dr. Greene’s 9:30-10:45 a.m. lecture, “The Foolishness of Trying to Regulate Our Way to School Improvement,” is open to the public. Burruss Building, Room 151. Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, 358,333 Georgians were on welfare (AFDC), compared… View Article

Name one other organization in the state that does what the Foundation does. You can’t.

Independent survey of Georgia business leaders on the Foundation. more quotes