Tag: innovation

Checking Up On Health: March 29, 2016

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd The law and unintended consequences One of the pieces of legislation that passed in the Georgia General Assembly is known as the Honorable Jimmy Carter Cancer Treatment Access Act. It’s prefaced with the statement that, “on December 6, President Carter revealed that his physicians said that all signs of cancer were gone.” The former president, you may recall, was diagnosed with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, and it had spread to his brain and liver. He was 91 years old at diagnosis. He continues to undergo treatment; he says his doctors found no trace of the lesions. The legislation, HB 965, mandates: No health benefit plan… View Article

Innovation is the True Health Care Solution

By Josh Daniels Political support for Medicaid expansion in Georgia is on life support and the prognosis may be terminal. This doesn’t mean, however, there isn’t a pathway forward for those looking for health care solutions. It’s the same pathway that has solved many of our problems: innovation. Each Medicaid expansion proposal has been a reaction to the failure of federal policy in attempting to address the “coverage gap.” But the gap is only a symptom of the underlying disease. The Affordable Care Act did little to actually make care affordable. In fact, it aggravated the very conditions that have driven health care costs up: regulation and government intervention. ObamaCare put more patients into the system with no corresponding increase… View Article
By Jeffrey Dorfman  Every member of the Georgia Legislature was elected this past November. Thus, one would expect those legislators to hold the citizens who elected them in high esteem; after all, they were wise enough to elect them, right? The next month or so will determine whether those legislators actually trust their voters to make independent decisions in the marketplace or they believe the citizens need to be protected from decisions elected officials don’t think we are capable of making on our own. Two bills before the Legislature demonstrate the choice before these politicians. One would allow craft brewers and brewpubs to actually sell beer for customers to take home; another would allow Tesla to sell cars directly to… View Article
Atlanta Journal-Constitution conservative columnist Kyle Wingfield and Georgia Center for Opportunity vice president Eric Cochling discuss eight issues that impact Georgians.  This conversation was recorded at our “Georgia Legislative Roundup” policy leadership breakfast on March 26 at The Georgian Club in Cobb County.  Segment introductions by Kelly McCutchen. Eric Cochling:  Georgia Criminal Justice Reform Success Kyle Wingfield: Balanced Budget Constitutional Amendment Initiatives Eric Cochling: Child Welfare and Foster Care Reform  Kyle Wingfield: Traffic Congestion and Transportation $$$ Eric Cochling:  Education Funding and School Choice Kyle Wingfield: Georgia Income Tax and Pension Reform Eric Cochling: Medicaid and Access to Health Care Kyle Wingfield: Entrenched Threats to Innovation  … View Article

Checking Up On Health

Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd 3D printing to build body parts:  Science fiction becomes reality at the Wake Forest Institute for regenerative medicine. Its lab has created the world’s first engineered urethra. First, researchers take a very small piece of tissue from a patient’s bladder. Then, they grow the cells outside the body and put the tailor-made urethra right back in the patient. Doctors were able to give five boys in Mexico who suffered pelvic injuries new urethras.  Researchers also are using a printer to create lab-grown ears. So far, it’s worked in animals. A CT scan of the existing ear generates a pattern that scientists replicate. A 3D image is made then layer by… View Article

As an employer, and a parent and a graduate of Georgia public schools, I am pleased that the Foundation has undertaken this project. (The report card) provides an excellent tool for parents and educators to objectively evaluate our public high schools. It will further serve a useful purpose as a benchmark for the future to measure our schools’ progress.

Dan Amos, CEO, AFLAC more quotes