Tag: hospitals

Obscure State Laws Hurt Patients, Make Hospitals Worse

By Christopher Koopman and Thomas Stratmann Comparing states with and without certificate-of-need laws provides us with a unique window into how providers would react in a world without CON laws: When providers have to compete for patients, the level of care increases. Individual doctors, nurses and health care administrators are doing their best, but on the macro level, the basic laws of economics still apply to their industry.  More than five decades have passed since New York state first enacted something called a certificate-of-need law (CON) in an effort to curb rising health care costs. Such laws, now enforced in 35 states and the District of Columbia, require providers to first seek permission from their state’s government before opening a… View Article
Everyone loves rankings. While it’s very helpful to understand where you rank compared to your peers, it’s also important to make sure the comparisons are valid. When comparing state taxing and spending it’s important to account for two factors: cost of living and differences in state and local government roles. The cost of living in California, for example, is higher than in Georgia, so the salary for a similar government job will usually be higher in California. Therefore, comparing per capita spending between states can be misleading. This is why economists often prefer to compare spending as a percentage of state personal income. Combining state and local data is also important because some states, like Georgia, are very decentralized, with… View Article

Checking Up On Health: November 11, 2014

Health Care News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd You’re stupid. Don’t sweat all this complicated gubmint stuff.  This week’s big health care story is the revelation of a 2013 video clip by Jonathan Gruber, an architect of the Affordable Care Act. It has stirred up a hornets’ nest. Gruber, addressing an academic conference, said that the passage of ObamaCare hinged on two things: the stupidity of American voters and ObamaCare proponents’ obfuscation. First, as a lesson to you all, let me recall the poet Omar Khayyam: “The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ, Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit, Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line, Nor all thy Tears wash out a… View Article

Checking Up On Health: January 22, 2013

Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd The trials of running clinical trials: About 89 percent of clinical trials meet their enrollment goals but 48 percent of trial sites miss enrollment and timeline goals, according to the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development. About 90 percent of drugmakers and research organizations use conventional methods such as physician referrals and mass media advertising to enroll participants. Considering how many of us use WebMD and Google to diagnose our ailments, it’s a real surprise that only 14 percent of these organizations use social media, online data mining and electronic health records to recruit participants. … In a related story: Pfizer last year gave up on a “… View Article

Checking Up On Health: November 27

Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd  The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has been out and about for the past two weeks, but we’re back in the office with the latest news on health care regulations, policy, technology and biotech in today’s Checking Up On Health!   Health care on a budget: How much is too much for a cancer drug treatment? Top health care experts meeting at the Institute of Medicine last month warned the nation’s 15,000 oncologists and their patients: Learn to deliver cancer care at lower costs or watch limits being imposed by the government and insurance companies. Merrill Goozner, senior correspondent for The Fiscal Times in Washington, D.C., reports that a top official from UnitedHealthcare, the… View Article

Checking Up On Health: October 23, 2012

  Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd ObamaCare by any name: In case you were wondering, the Foundation has typically stayed away from using the term “ObamaCare” to describe the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. But now that even the President has embraced it, all bets are off: “I actually like the name,” he said in August. “Because I do care – that’s why we fought so hard to make it happen.” It’s like “googling” something on the Internet: Google knew it had it made when it became a verb. We’ll still use the legitimate name at least once in an article, however, to ensure that it turns up when googled … It’s not View Article

Checking Up On Health

Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd Medically induced silence: In an article in Forbes magazine discussing President Obama’s silence on his landmark legislation during the Democratic National Convention, Grace-Marie Turner of the Galen Institute notes that there were some heartwrenching personal stories told on how the law will help families. “But turning one-sixth of our economy over to the federal government on the basis of these personal stories, however wrenching, is very dangerous indeed. We can much better help families like the Lihns and their daughter (highlighted at the convention) if we have a vibrant health sector that stays on the cutting edge of innovation and has the resources and capacity to care for the most vulnerable.”… View Article

Checking Up On Health: September 4, 2012

Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd On common ground: The Galen Institute held a forum at last week’s Republican National Convention; the panel that included Georgia’s two physician Congressmen, Tom Price and Phil Gingrey. Medpage Today reports that there was agreement that there could be bipartisan consensus on a health care approach. People from both parties can agree on some health care principles, said U.S. Rep Tom Price of Georgia, an orthopedic surgeon. “We agree that health care needs to be affordable for everybody, accessible for everybody, it needs to be of the highest quality and there absolutely must be choices for patients. That’s the common ground.” Source: Medpage Today Physician shortages: The United States has… View Article

The Foundation should take a lot of pride in your influence on Georgia governmental policy over the past several years. If you look back on several things that you were crying in the wilderness about several years ago, you will find that Governor Miller adopted them…your influence and your pressure on that process has been a major factor in governmental policy in Georgia. You should be congratulated.

Governor Sonny Perdue more quotes