Tag: Health Care

Friday Facts: July 8, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, the Legislature approved a constitutional amendment designating lottery funds for education purposes. Voters ratified it in 1992 and the lottery began in 1993. Over the years, the Georgia Lottery Corp. reports generating more than $17.4 billion for education. Tonight’s Mega Millions jackpot is $540 million; the pot has rolled over since March. Guide to the Issues 2016: Find out what the Foundation proposes on issues such as transportation, health care, education, taxes and more. Currently available online, each chapter includes principles for reform, facts on the issue, background information and, in most cases, positive solutions to the challenges facing Georgia.  Quotes of Note View Article

Expand Access to Care, Not Medicaid

By Kelly McCutchen Those addressing Georgia’s uninsured and failing hospitals seem stuck between two options: expanding a government program (Medicaid) with its own long list of challenges, or doing nothing. It’s a false choice. Expanding Medicaid is undoubtedly the worst option for providing more Georgians access. For providers – even with more money from the federal government – Medicaid still pays less than their cost. It’s a bad deal for taxpayers: Expansion is estimated to cost more than $7,000 for able-bodied adults; the current Medicaid program spends $3,022. If Georgia’s more than 200,000 low-income adults who already have private insurance opt for the “free” program, the cost will be even higher. It’s also a bad deal for recipients. A study… View Article

Rome’s Free Clinic: Community Taking Charge

By Benita M. Dodd Dr. Leonard Reeves shares an experience that epitomizes his role as president of the Faith and Deeds Community Health free clinic in Rome, Ga. A forklift operator visited the emergency room a few years ago. “By the time I got to him he was already admitted,” recalls Reeves, a family practice physician. “He was diabetic and in renal failure. His kidneys were gone – in his 30s!” The man knew he had been diabetic since he was a teenager but did nothing about it. “A man who had been working every day did not have any insurance and did not have enough money to go to the doctor,” says Reeves. “When he left the hospital he… View Article

Friday Facts: June 3, 2016

It’s Friday! Events  Monday, June 6: “The Politics of School Choice” is a Leadership Breakfast keynoted by national education expert Jay Greene and sponsored by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Education Economics Center at Kennesaw State University. 7:30 a.m., Room 278, Burruss Building, Kennesaw State University. Parking available in the visitors’ lot. $20 includes event and Chick-fil-A breakfast. Register online here.  Also on June 6, Dr. Greene’s 9:30-10:45 a.m. lecture, “The Foolishness of Trying to Regulate Our Way to School Improvement,” is open to the public. Burruss Building, Room 151. Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, 358,333 Georgians were on welfare (AFDC), compared… View Article

Checking Up On Health: May 3, 2016

Health Care News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd Late last year, I visited a friend who had fractured her leg and was wheelchair-bound, recovering after surgery in a rehabilitation center in Atlanta. By the time I’d circled the parking lot twice and resorted to parking on the street, I was already unimpressed. The reception desk was unstaffed, the sign-in sheet on a clipboard. I got into a small, slow elevator in the four-story building and walked a cramped hallway to her drab room.   I’m sure the staff was nice and professional, but I wondered how the facility’s four stories would be evacuated in any emergency. It occurred to me that opportunities for attractive post-operative recovery and long-term rehabilitation… View Article

Checking Up On Health: March 29, 2016

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd The law and unintended consequences One of the pieces of legislation that passed in the Georgia General Assembly is known as the Honorable Jimmy Carter Cancer Treatment Access Act. It’s prefaced with the statement that, “on December 6, President Carter revealed that his physicians said that all signs of cancer were gone.” The former president, you may recall, was diagnosed with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, and it had spread to his brain and liver. He was 91 years old at diagnosis. He continues to undergo treatment; he says his doctors found no trace of the lesions. The legislation, HB 965, mandates: No health benefit plan… View Article

Friday Facts: February 26, 2016

It’s Friday!  Honors: The Georgia Public Policy Foundation was honored with a Senate Resolution Tuesday to mark 25 years of serving Georgia with ideas for limited-government, free-market solutions and promoting “policy over politics.” Accepting the honor in the Senate chamber on behalf of the Foundation were two former presidents of the Foundation, Griff Doyle (1993-97) and T. Rogers Wade (1997-2010), who is also Board Chairman; current President Kelly McCutchen (2011-present) and Vice President Benita Dodd (2003-present). View the video here.  Then and now: In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, the average cost of a gallon of regular gas was $1.14 – $1.98 in today’s dollars. This week, the cost is $1.49 at View Article

Checking Up On Health: February 23, 2016

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd I shared a recollection on Facebook recently that is simply amazing in its lesson that it can be a deadly mistake to accept that, “That’s the way we’ve always done it.” I was visiting the Friendly Human studios down at Atlanta’s Tech Village a couple of years ago, and got into a discussion with one of the company execs. We were talking about innovation in doing things, etc. He shared his experience at a medical convention he’d gone to videotape and the story he heard from an oncologist panelist. (It’s been a while and I’m paraphrasing big-time, so bear with me.) The oncologist said he’d been treating brain cancer patients,… View Article

Direct Care Resources

As the General Assembly debates the merits of direct care arrangements, here are some resources for those who want more information on this subject: Direct Primary Care (DPC) Puts Patients Back in the Driver’s Seat Empowering the relationship between doctors and patients is the key to achieving superior health outcomes, lower costs and an enhanced patient experience. DPC fosters this relationship by focusing on five key tenets: Service: The hallmark of DPC is adequate time spent between patient and physician, creating an enduring doctor-patient relationship. Patient Choice: Patients in DPC choose their own personal physician and are reactive partners in their healthcare. Elimination of Fee-For-Service: DPC eliminates undesired fee-for-service(FFS) incentives in primary care. These incentives distort healthcare decision-making by… View Article

Georgia Needs Direct Care Now

By Hal C. Scherz The Affordable Care Act (ACA) passed with the promise of decreasing the high costs of health care and increasing access to care by making health care insurance more affordable. Almost six years later, it appears that this experiment to remake American health care has been a failure. The average American now pays over $4,000 more for health care insurance, with deductibles in the $6,000 range. Meanwhile, 10-15 million Americans still lack health insurance. The ACA has disrupted the health insurance market, making it difficult for healthy young Americans to purchase insurance. Of the 23 Federal-state insurance co-ops, 11 have declared bankruptcy and all are in the red except one. All insurance companies participating in the insurance… View Article

The best way to make a lasting impact on public policy is to change public opinion. When you change the beliefs of the people; the politicians and political parties change with them.

Senator Herman E. Talmadge more quotes