Tag: government reform

Friday Facts: July 15, 2016

It’s Friday! Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, we urged in the LaGrange Daily News: “We must free parents to choose the school their child will attend. It should be obvious that parents, not government, know what is best for their children.” Twenty-five years later, resistance to school choice continues. Follow us! The Foundation is just eight shy of 3,000 Facebook “likes!” Our Twitter account has 1,641 followers at twitter.com/gppf. Follow us on Instagram, too! Guide to the Issues 2016: Find out what the Foundation proposes on issues such as transportation, health care, education, taxes and more. Currently available online, each chapter includes principles for reform, facts… View Article
The July 3, 2016 edition of The Marietta Daily Journal published an op-ed by Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd, “Price Controls, a Poor Prescription for Georgia.” The article is below in its entirety; access it online here.  Price Controls, a Poor Prescription for Georgia By Benita Dodd It’s been 15 months since the end of a war — and one country has decided to keep its war-time price controls on meat intact. The result? Social and economic chaos. Hundreds of meat shelves empty, thousands of jobs lost and dozens of businesses gone under. Sound like fiction? Unfortunately, as Georgians from the Greatest Generation may recall, this exact situation plagued the United States in the months following the end of World… View Article

Friday Facts: July 1, 2016

July 1, 2016 It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, U.S. Rep. Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), the only Republican among Georgia’s 10 Congressmen and two senators, was the Minority Whip of the House. Both chambers were majority Democrat. Today, both chambers are majority Republican; the former Georgia Congressman and U.S. House Speaker is being mentioned as a running mate for presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump; both Georgia senators and 10 of the 14 Congressmen are Republican. U.S. Rep. John Lewis is the only current Georgia member from the 102nd Congress. Guide to the Issues 2016: Find out what the Foundation proposes on issues such as transportation, health care, education, taxes… View Article

Friday Facts: June 17, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, electronic messages were hardly the norm; the term “email” gained popularity by 1993. Today, According to the Harvard Business Review, email takes up 23 percent of the average employee’s workday and, collectively, we send more than 108 billion emails a day in the United States. Guide to the Issues 2016, compiled by the Foundation, is now available online. Each chapter includes principles for reform, facts on the issue, background information and, in most cases, positive solutions to the challenges facing Georgia.  Quotes of Note  “The laws that forbid the carrying of arms are laws of such a nature. They disarm only those… View Article
By Geoff Duncan For generations, government has tried to solve the issues surrounding poverty by adding new programs or growing existing ones.  Much to the surprise of bureaucrats, the outcomes from this approach are uninspiring. Michael Tanner of the Cato Institute found the federal government spent $1 trillion on 126 different anti-poverty programs in 2013 without making a dent in any of the key metrics around poverty. Government has led us to believe if we simply pay our taxes on time each year it will take care of the needy and we can move on with our busy lives. Remind me again: What is the definition of insanity? This past legislative session, Georgia launched an innovative approach to tackle issues… View Article

Friday Facts: May 6, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, dial-up Internet modem speeds were 14.4 kilobits per second. The 56KB modem went on sale in 1998, and a gigabyte of information would take about 40 hours to receive. For comparison, a gigabyte of HDTV data, delivered at 2015 speeds, amounts to seven minutes of video. The Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s Guide to the Issues 2016 is now available online. Each Issue chapter includes the Foundation’s principles for reform, facts on the issue, background information and, in most cases, specific proposals that we believe provide positive solutions to the challenges facing Georgia. Issues covered include Criminal Justice, Education, Health Care, Higher Education, Long-Term… View Article

Checking Up On Health: May 3, 2016

Health Care News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd Late last year, I visited a friend who had fractured her leg and was wheelchair-bound, recovering after surgery in a rehabilitation center in Atlanta. By the time I’d circled the parking lot twice and resorted to parking on the street, I was already unimpressed. The reception desk was unstaffed, the sign-in sheet on a clipboard. I got into a small, slow elevator in the four-story building and walked a cramped hallway to her drab room.   I’m sure the staff was nice and professional, but I wondered how the facility’s four stories would be evacuated in any emergency. It occurred to me that opportunities for attractive post-operative recovery and long-term rehabilitation… View Article

Checking Up On Health: March 29, 2016

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd The law and unintended consequences One of the pieces of legislation that passed in the Georgia General Assembly is known as the Honorable Jimmy Carter Cancer Treatment Access Act. It’s prefaced with the statement that, “on December 6, President Carter revealed that his physicians said that all signs of cancer were gone.” The former president, you may recall, was diagnosed with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, and it had spread to his brain and liver. He was 91 years old at diagnosis. He continues to undergo treatment; he says his doctors found no trace of the lesions. The legislation, HB 965, mandates: No health benefit plan… View Article

An Assault on Nonprofit Giving

This commentary by Jon Riches appeared March 18 in Philanthropy Daily and is republished below. Access the commentary online at http://www.philanthropydaily.com/an-assault-on-nonprofit-giving/. An Assault on Nonprofit Giving By Jon Riches Do you donate to the National Rifle Association, the Sierra Club, or your local art museum? If so, you may soon be required to report your name, address, and contribution amounts to the government. Couched as “transparency” measures, a wave of regulatory action, legislative proposals, and ballot measures are aimed at eliminating, or significantly curtailing, private charitable giving. The first line of attack on donor privacy has come from partisan regulators. Attorneys General in both New York and California have been notifying nonprofit organizations that they must disclose private tax… View Article

Criminal Justice Reform Unshackles Georgians

By Benita M. Dodd Appeals Court Judge Michael P. Boggs, co-chair of the Georgia Council on Criminal Justice Reform since 2012, makes a passionate case for the strides that have taken Georgia to the forefront in criminal justice reform. The Waycross jurist recalls presiding over a drug court in six rural counties in South Georgia. “I asked defendants three questions,” Boggs told the Faith and Freedom Coalition’s annual Legislative Luncheon recently. “When did you first drop out of school? Ninth grade. “What drug did you first start using? Marijuana. “When did you first start using it? Age 13. Boggs asked the luncheon attendees to guess: “How many of the first 6,000 criminal defendants I dealt with in felony criminal court… View Article

I thank you for what you do. For 15 years you’ve been researching and writing on issues that matter. You take on tough questions, you apply innovative thinking, you push for action, and you do it all without regard to politics.

President George W. Bush more quotes