Tag: Georgia

In the Atlanta Journal-Constitution of May 12, 2013, political columnist Jim Galloway addressed the growing controversy over the Common Core Standards. His article hinted at one possible solution to the problem, pointing out that Scott Johnson, a newly appointed member of the state school board, has asked the Georgia Public Policy Foundation “to examine Common Core this summer and separate truth from fantasy.” “I want an honest broker to look at this thing,” Johnson said. “I’d be satisfied with that.” Read more: http://tinyurl.com/cnlpu4c. View Article
Launched in March 2013, the Student Outreach Scholarship (SOS) Program is a fund established to cover the charge* for eligible students to attend Foundation events to which they otherwise would not be exposed. The program targets students who have the ability to make a difference in their circle of influence but would under ordinary circumstances not hear the messages delivered by renowned speakers from around the nation who advocate free-market approaches, limited government, individual responsibility and accountability and a spirit of entrepreneurship; in short, this nation’s Founding principles. Supporters of free markets and individual responsibility are losing students to liberal college professors and the ideas of nanny government. And that is eroding the chances of getting America back to what… View Article

How the South Will Rise to Power Again

By Joel Kotkin The common media view of the South is as a regressive region, full of overweight, prejudiced, exploited and under-educated numb skulls . This meme was perfectly captured in this Bill Maher-commissioned video from Alexandra Pelosi, the New York-based daughter of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. Given the level of imbecility, maybe we’d be better off if the former Confederate states exiled themselves into their own redneck empire. Travel writer Chuck Thompson recently suggested this approach in a new book. Right now, however, Northerners can content themselves with the largely total isolation of Southerners from the corridors of executive power. Yet even as the old Confederacy’s political banner fades, its long-term economic prospects shine bright.  This… View Article

Telemedicine, a Telling Sign of Health Care’s Future

By Benita M. Dodd Money is tight and physicians are in short supply in many Georgia counties, so innovation and ingenuity are the keys in dealing with health coverage mandates required under the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act commonly referred to as ObamaCare.  In January, State Public Health Commissioner Brenda Fitzgerald announced that she plans to roll out “telemedicine” carts in public health centers across the state. These centers already are wired for teleconferencing between physicians and patients, many of whom are in rural areas with no or limited access to the specialists congregating in urban areas. Adding cameras, computers and medical equipment would allow real-time, long-distance consultations and diagnoses. That’s a good start, but Georgia can do… View Article

Medicaid Expansion: Hand Up or Handcuff?

By Ronald E. Bachman Medicaid has several components, but at its core it is a federal-state partnership to provide a health insurance program for the poor. Although states’ programs can differ, most provide for those below the poverty level. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act required that states expand Medicaid to those earning up to 138 percent of the poverty level (about $25,000 for a family of three). The U.S. Supreme Court ruled, however, that each state can accept or reject the federal expansion of Medicaid. Like other states, Georgia had to make that choice, and Gov. Nathan Deal is refusing to expand Medicaid. “I think that is something our state cannot afford,” Deal told reporters.” And even though… View Article
By Steve Metz Georgia’s Teachers Retirement System (TRS) represents a significant cost to taxpayers and an important part of teachers’ compensation and benefits package.  The current system is typical of government / teacher pension plans set up many years ago and it serves many teachers well (especially those who put in 30 or 40 years).  There are a lot of situations where it does not work well in today’s world however, and there are many reasons to believe it should be revised. From an employer’s perspective, a retirement plan should help with the Three R’s: Recruiting, Retaining and Rewarding employees.  In the rest of this discussion I will address how the TRS could be modified to better meet these objectives.… View Article

State Property Leases Could Get a New Lease on Life

By Benita M. Dodd There are two constitutional amendments on the ballot in Georgia for voters to consider on November 6. To borrow a word revived in the American lexicon by Vice President Joe Biden, there has been much malarkey in the debate regarding Amendment No. 1, which would provide more public charter school options. Few voters, however, are even aware of Amendment No. 2, which would allow the state to enter multi-year property lease agreements. Georgia’s State Properties Commission, responsible for the inventory of all owned or leased state government facilities and property, has a database of 1,800 leases, 15,000 buildings and 1.1 million acres. The Commission says a longstanding interpretation of the Georgia Constitution limits the state to… View Article

“Plan B” in The News

Sunday’s Atlanta Journal-Constitution featured an op-ed by Foundation President Kelly McCutchen as well as an editorial focused on the Foundation’s “Plan B” for transportation in Georgia. The editorial noted: “Drafting a Plan B won’t be easy, but the work must begin, both in the legislature and in town halls across the region. We hope the GPPF’s outline will jumpstart the process.” A link to Kelly McCutchen’s article: http://blogs.ajc.com/atlanta-forward/2012/10/08/openness-ideas-can-get-georgia-rolling/?cxntfid=blogs_atlanta_forward A link to theAJC editorial: http://blogs.ajc.com/atlanta-forward/2012/10/08/a-first-step-toward-plan-b-solutions/?cxntfid=blogs_atlanta_forward View Article
By Mike Klein Two young women in my family attend two-year colleges.  The match is perfect.  One works four days per week at a veterinary hospital and takes classes two days.  The other works three or four days per week in a restaurant and attends school days and evenings.  Not too many years ago the family might have expected these young women would be in four-year schools but two-year schools are the best match for their study needs, work schedules and finances. My own family is an example of the emphasis on using two-year colleges for exceptional value and what they bring to the table.  Young and increasingly older adults recognize they must have a ticket to get onto the… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd One of the major missions in establishing the Georgia Public Policy Foundation in 1991 was to provide a “resource bank” for elected officials, policy-makers and citizens interested in implementing commonsense policy in a limited-government environment to facilitate a thriving state economy. Understanding the limited research staff that lawmakers can access regarding Georgia-focused issues, the third annual Georgia Legislative Policy Forum on Friday, September 21, brings experts and analysts from across the nation to Atlanta.  At this nonpartisan event, co-sponsored by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Conservative Policy Leadership Institute, attendees will hear views on moving the state past “the recent unpleasantness” that has roiled the economy. This year, as in the past two years,… View Article

The Foundation should take a lot of pride in your influence on Georgia governmental policy over the past several years. If you look back on several things that you were crying in the wilderness about several years ago, you will find that Governor Miller adopted them…your influence and your pressure on that process has been a major factor in governmental policy in Georgia. You should be congratulated.

Governor Sonny Perdue more quotes