Friday Facts: July 3, 2014

The goals worth championing as we celebrate America’s independence.

Friday Facts: June 5, 2015

What’s up, what’s down in transportation.

Friday Facts: April 10, 2015

April 15 is coming up; get the facts on taxes.

Friday Facts: November 7, 2014

It’s Friday! Quotes of Note “I want the people of America to be able to work less for the government – and more for themselves. I want them to have the rewards of their own industry. This is the chief meaning of freedom. Until we can reestablish a condition under which the earnings of the people can be kept by the people, we are bound to suffer a very severe and distinct curtailment of our liberty.” – President Calvin Coolidge, August 11, 1924 “[E]very single day, I’m looking for how … Continue Reading →

Friday Facts: June 20, 2014

Why has household inequality increased in the United States?

Video Forum: Governor Deal Video Address to DFCS Employees

Governor Nathan Deal spoke to state Division of Family and Children Services employees today via the internet, one day after he announced a major shake-up at DFCS. The video was uploaded to YouTube.

Friday Facts: May 9, 2014

Where’s Georgia’s top barbecue?

Friday Facts: April 4, 2014

It’s Friday! Events  April 24: Matt Candler, founder and CEO of 4.0 Schools, keynotes, “School Choice: Big Gains in The Big Easy,” the Foundation’s Leadership Breakfast at 8 a.m. at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. This event is open to the public and is $25 to attend. Find out more at https://www.georgiapolicy.org/?p=12626. Register at http://bit.ly/1lmETV5. May 7: Foundation Members get a discount rate of $159 to attend “Health Reform 2.0: The Great Debate,” the first face-to-face debate between two of the nation’s most influential health care experts: John Goodman of the … Continue Reading →

Register for April 24 Event On School Choice in The Big Easy

GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION EVENT March 31, 2014 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Foundation’s April 24 Event: ‘School Choice: Big Gains in The Big Easy’  Atlanta – What does leadership in school choice look like? New Orleans, La.   What does leadership in school choice sound like? Matt Candler, chairman of the Louisiana Association of Public Charter Schools and CEO of 4.0 Schools.  Candler, an Atlanta native, is the keynote speaker at the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast on Thursday, April 24, 2014, at Cobb County’s Georgian … Continue Reading →

Last Chance to Register for Wednesday’s Legislative Wrapup!

GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION EVENT March 24, 2014 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Last Chance to Register for Wednesday’s ‘Legislative Roundup’ Kyle Wingfield, Eric Cochling Review the 2013-14 Session and Look Ahead Atlanta – If you haven’t yet registered, a reminder: Today is the registration deadline for “Georgia Legislative Roundup,” the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s Leadership Breakfast Wednesday at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. The 8 a.m. event is open to the public and features Eric Cochling, vice president of Policy Development at the Georgia Center for Opportunity, and … Continue Reading →

Friday Facts: March 7, 2014

The new SAT appears to bear some strong similarities to the Common Core State Standards.

Georgia: The Making of a Tech Powerhouse

Why have so many new startups and existing tech giants come to call Atlanta – and, indeed, all of Georgia – home and what will it take to continue the momentum?

Atlanta Journal-Constitution praises Foundation Medicaid Solution

AJC editorial cites Foundation’s Medicaid proposal.

Journal-Constitution Report: Foundation
Examining Common Core Standards

Scott Johnson, a new member of the state Board of Education, says Foundation, an “honest broker,” is examining Common Core.

About The Georgia Public Policy Foundation Student Outreach Scholarship (SOS) Program

Launched in March 2013, the Student Outreach Scholarship (SOS) Program is a fund established to cover the charge* for eligible students to attend Foundation events to which they otherwise would not be exposed.

How the South Will Rise to Power Again

The common media view of the South is as a regressive region, full of overweight, prejudiced, exploited and under-educated numb skulls . This meme was perfectly captured in this Bill Maher-commissioned video from Alexandra Pelosi, the New York-based daughter of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. But the South has already begun to rise again and there are abundant reasons why, as explained in great detail by Joel Kotkin, Executive Editor of NewGeorgraphy.Com which studies U.S. domestic and international economic trends.

When Economy Cracked, Many Georgians Cracked the Books

Two young women in my family attend two-year colleges. The match is perfect.

“Plan B” in The News

Kelly McCutchen’s op-ed and an editorial focused on transportation policy in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution of Sunday, October 7.

Friday Facts

      It’s Friday!   Quotes of note – “A government with the policy to rob Peter to pay Paul can be assured of the support of Paul.” – George Bernard Shaw – “Figures often beguile me, particularly when I have the arranging of them myself; in which case the remark attributed to Disraeli would often apply with justice and force: “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics.” – Mark Twain – “A general State education is a mere contrivance for molding people to be exactly … Continue Reading →

Checking up on Health Care

 Health Policy Briefs: March 27, 2012 Compiled by Benita M. Dodd  The U.S. Supreme Court heads into its third day of oral arguments on the Obama administration’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on Wednesday.    To get a perspective that digs deeper than the mainstream media, visit these links provided by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation.   Click here for coverage of Day 1 at the U.S. Supreme Court from the Heritage Foundation.   Today, on Day 2 of deliberations, reports Hans von Spakovsky of the Heritage Foundation, “The funniest … Continue Reading →