Friday Facts: February 1, 2013

Georgia law enforcement agencies seize millions of dollars in assets every year from people who are never even charged with, much less convicted of, a crime.

The Unique Challenge of Georgia Juvenile Repeat Crime

By Mike Klein The devil is always in the details and sometimes details are like trying to put lipstick on a pig.  The recidivism rate for Georgia juveniles is a case in point. One-in-two juveniles leave the system and do not return within three years.  But one-in-two are back within three years, usually because of a new crime, violation of a court order or a probation offense.  There is a cash cost for that level of failure and there also is a human cost. When the Special Council on Criminal … Continue Reading →

Who’s the Executive in Charge of Criminal Justice Reform?

By Mike Klein Governor Nathan Deal signed criminal justice reform legislation Wednesday, triggering the most aggressive rebranding of the state’s approach to criminal perpetrators in several decades.  But one question that needs to be resolved is who’s responsible for making sure this all happens? It sounds like the answer begins with the Special Council on Criminal Justice Reform whose work provided the structure for Georgia’s new law.  Governor Deal signed House Bill 1176 during an upbeat signing ceremony just below the north steps at the State Capitol in Atlanta. Answering … Continue Reading →

Corrections Reform: Do We Prefer Taxpayers or Tax Burdens?

Originally published April 21, 2010 Each day across Georgia, the state Department of Corrections prepares three meals per day to feed a population that is nearly equal to the number of residents living in Marietta.  It takes thousands of pounds of food to feed nearly 60,000 adult prisoners.  Paying for all that food served at 31 state prisons costs taxpayers $1 billion per year, including the cost to manage 150,000 parolees. This month the PEW Center on the States reported the first year-to-year drop in state prison population since 1972. … Continue Reading →

Georgia Will Test Telephone Self-Reporting for Low-Risk Adult Parolees

Georgia will test a new model that could result in more effective supervision of high-risk parolees because less time would be required for low-risk parolees.  In July the state will begin a three-month telephone reporting pilot project and the in…