Tag: Georgia public policy

A Model for Using Hybrid Approach in the Classroom

By Eric Wearne As the research continues to try to keep up with the practice on online and blended learning, it can be useful to look at what the marketplace of ideas is producing in the real world. Last week Education Sector profiled Alliance Tennenbaum Family Technology High School, a charter school in Los Angeles, and discussed the school’s use of technology to expand the reach of its teachers: “The school uses a hybrid model that combines online and traditional instruction and allows students to learn in three different ways. On this particular fall day, 16 students are getting traditional in-person instruction in Algebra I from teacher Wendy Chaves; roughly the same number are doing math problems online; and… View Article
This week, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, quoted Kelly McCutchen’s response to a study that reported that expanding Medicaid would benefit Georgia’s economy: “McCutchen said low-income Georgians need access to health care, but he pointed out that the state can’t afford its current Medicaid program. ‘You would have a large economic impact if you drop $4 billion out of a helicopter, but that doesn’t mean it’s the right thing to do,’ McCutchen said. ‘The issue is what is the best way to address the uninsured in Georgia, and is it sustainable?’”  … View Article

Friday Facts: February 15, 2013

It’s Friday! Today is the deadline to register for the Foundation’s Leadership Breakfast at Cobb County’s Georgian Club, 8 a.m. on Tuesday, February 19. Keynoted by the Cato Institute’s Randal O’Toole, “American Dream, American Nightmare,” is an explanation of the forces at play in the housing market in Georgia and in the nation, and how to rebuild the American Dream of homeownership. This event is open to the public and will cost $25 to attend. Find out more at http://tinyurl.com/avnapnh. Register here: http://tinyurl.com/7ldaqnk. A limited number of O’Toole’s book, “American Nightmare,” will be available for purchase at $20 each. Quotes of Note “The urge to save humanity is almost always only a false-face for the urge… View Article
By Kelly McCutchen  Every day, Georgia consumers and businesses propel the state forward, increasingly with a cell phone in their hands.   Wireless is now an indispensible service for commerce. More small business owners are using wirelessly connected tablets and smartphones to handle credit card purchases. Huge volumes of goods are shipped and handled from the Port of Savannah and over roads with the aid of wirelessly connected handhelds and specially designed tracking tags. Patients are able to monitor their health and interact with doctors all using wireless devices and services.  Wireless is a jobs driver in our state. While Georgia’s job picture has been getting better, unemployment remains too high for any of us. Jobs in the wireless industry have… View Article

Checking Up On Health: February 12

  Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd  N.C. says no to Medicaid expansion: North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory is backing a move by the Legislature to block the state from expanding its Medicaid program or participating in the state health insurance exchanges created by the Federal Affordable Care Act. In a news release today, McCrory made the point, “In light of recent Medicaid audits, the current system in North Carolina is broken and not ready to expand without great risk to the taxpayers and to the delivery of existing services to those in need. We must first fix and reform the current system.” The state will also not create an exchange, but will leave it to… View Article

Telemedicine, a Telling Sign of Health Care’s Future

By Benita M. Dodd Money is tight and physicians are in short supply in many Georgia counties, so innovation and ingenuity are the keys in dealing with health coverage mandates required under the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act commonly referred to as ObamaCare.  In January, State Public Health Commissioner Brenda Fitzgerald announced that she plans to roll out “telemedicine” carts in public health centers across the state. These centers already are wired for teleconferencing between physicians and patients, many of whom are in rural areas with no or limited access to the specialists congregating in urban areas. Adding cameras, computers and medical equipment would allow real-time, long-distance consultations and diagnoses. That’s a good start, but Georgia can do… View Article

Friday Facts: February 8, 2013

February 8, 2013  It’s Friday! February 19: The Foundation’s Leadership Breakfast at Cobb County’s Georgian Club, 8 a.m. on Tuesday, February 19, is keynoted by the Cato Institute’s Randal O’Toole. In “American Dream, American Nightmare,” he offers an explanation of the forces at play in the housing market in Georgia and in the nation, and how to rebuild the American Dream of homeownership. This event is open to the public and will cost $25 to attend. Find out more at http://tinyurl.com/avnapnh. Register by Friday, February 15, at http://tinyurl.com/7ldaqnk. Quotes of Note “This is our challenge. And this is why, here in this hall tonight — better than we’ve ever done before — we’ve got to quit… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd Atlanta resident Josiah Neff is so passionate about civil asset forfeiture reform in Georgia that last year he filed suit. One of five plaintiffs in a lawsuit against law enforcement agencies in Atlanta and Fulton County, the software company employee was outraged that the agencies didn’t even bother to comply with state law requiring them to disclose the private property they seized under suspicion that it was used or involved in criminal activity. Three months later, when the suit went to trial, it took the judge just 30 minutes to rule the agencies out of compliance. But the victory for Neff, who currently heads Atlanta’s Libertarian Party, is hollow for the rest of Georgia: As of… View Article

Pipeline from Canada Trickles Down to Georgia

By Benita M. Dodd Choosing between energy independence and energy security is like choosing between cherry pie and pie-in-the-sky: Only one is real. A 1,700-mile planned oil pipeline from Canada to Texas could bring security to this nation’s oil supply, but environmental activists and (more recently) “Occupy” types pushing for pie-in-the-sky independence from fossil fuel energy are doing everything they can to deny Americans energy security. The $7 billion Keystone XL pipeline would carry more than a half-million barrels of oil a day from the oil sands of Alberta, Canada, across several U.S. states to U.S. refineries in the Gulf.  It holds enormous promise for the United States, which imports about half of its oil. First, the Canadian-financed pipeline assures… View Article

Rail’s No Way In or To San Jose

By Benita M. Dodd For those who love to watch the passing parade – and have the time and inclination – few places are better than the sardine can that is a train. That’s why, once one neglects to make a timely reservation on any of the popular 30-minute, $40 road shuttle services between San Francisco and San Jose, the $7.50 Caltrain ticket becomes an enticing option. Once. For 90 minutes in a nearly empty doubledecker car, you have the unique opportunity to eavesdrop on loud cell phone conversations; watch the Webcam conversation on the laptop beneath you; follow in fascination as a wannabe chef creates and devours a strawberry shortcake before your very eyes, or gaze out a grimy… View Article

Thank you for the great work that the Public Policy Foundation is doing across our state setting a wonderful example. I first ran for the Senate in 1994, and the Foundation was that resource I called upon to be a great help to me as we were articulating positions and formulating public policy initiatives. We appreciate very much your leadership and all that you stand for.

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle more quotes