Tag: Georgia Public Policy Foundation

State Needs to Come Around to Roundabouts

By Dan Winn Even a transportation novice observing the graceful traffic flow around Ellijay’s bustling town square in Northeast Georgia would come away mystified that there are so few circular intersections, or “roundabouts,” in the state and the nation. Like Ellijay’s 2-year-old roundabout surrounding a memorial to slain warriors, these traffic devices have a whole lot more than grace going for them. As a more efficient method of moving traffic through most intersections, they have the potential to save this nation millions of gallons of gasoline and millions of hours in commute time, all while reducing traffic deaths and injuries. A roundabout, in its simplest form, is a circle of road that surrounds a raised island in the middle of… View Article
By Morgan Smith I. Summary In 2001, the Georgia Legislature convened a Study Committee in the House of Representatives to examine complaints raised by the state’s alcohol retailers about some businesses practices on the part of alcohol wholesalers. The subsequent examination of the state’s regulation of the alcohol distribution industry brought to light serious questions about the structure and value of economic protections provided to the wholesalers. It is widely accepted that state regulation of alcohol distribution is an important and necessary undertaking. But it is also clear that some elements of Georgia’s regulatory policy haven’t kept pace with changes in both the industry’s participants and the shape of the marketplace. As with all instances of state intervention in “special”… View Article
By Betsey Weltner At a time when state government is downsizing, privatizing services and deregulating utilities, relieved Georgia taxpayers have a new threat on the horizon — municipal development of telephone, cable and Internet services. The high-tech, high-risk telecommunications industry is no place for local governments to be, but the power of cities to tax and regulate the private industry “competition” has created an uneven playing field in Georgia. Further, while dozens of Georgia cities are either planning or implementing costly telecommunications systems, they are doing so without public approval of any kind. Consider a Georgia statewide poll taken in September 1998 on the subject of municipal “competition” with private telecommunications industries. 500 registered voters across the state were asked… View Article

Privatization: Dispelling the Myths

By Kelly McCutchen In reaction to the state’s new emphasis on competitive contracting of services, the state employees’ union has begun a full-scale campaign to stigmatize and discredit the concept of privatization. Their horror stories are attempts to spread the myth that contracting with the private sector will fail to save taxpayers money, will reduce the quality of services and will result in widespread fraud and corruption. These myths, however, can easily be refuted. Myth #1 Privatization well lead to widespread layoffs of state employees. Most public employees do not lose their jobs as a result of privatization. In fact, many states require private contractors to give hiring preferences to current state employees, while other states go even further by… View Article
By U.S. Representative Bill Archer An Agenda for the Next Century As the year 2000 draws near, we must develop an agenda for the next century. We must rethink the way government does its job – and be willing to investigate bold changes to those things which are incompatible with the new reality of the U.S. in a global marketplace. In today’s world, our nation’s income tax has become a liability. I believe that the time has come to tear the income tax out by its roots and implement a whole new way of raising federal revenues. In the Ways and Means Committee hearings, we have begun the process of developing a new design of federal taxation which would meet… View Article

To have an organization dedicated to the study of the problems that face Georgia in a bipartisan way….is absolutely one of the finest things that’s happened to our state.

The late W. H. Flowers, Jr., Chairman, Flowers industries, Inc. more quotes