Tag: Georgia General Assembly

Good enough on some levels but not good enough across-the-board. That was their analysis of the 2014 General Assembly from Eric Cochling and Kyle Wingfield at our sold-out policy breakfast on Wednesday, March 26.  Cochling is vice president of public policy at the Georgia Center for Opportunity and Wingfield is the conservative voice on The Atlanta Journal-Constitution editorial pages. “You saw a lot of excitement about certain ideas whether it was welfare reform or new school choice concepts coming through that made it through a chamber with vast majorities voting in favor of it but then it goes on to die in the other chamber,” Cochling said.  “I would characterize the session as some positive things happened but many missed… View Article

Short Session Shouldn’t Keep Legislators From Reforms

By KELLY McCUTCHEN Their sights may be set on the looming election season and campaigns, but a reluctance to rock the boat is no reason for Georgia legislators to keep 2014’s short legislative session in the doldrums when there are opportunities to move forward on policy in Georgia. With the exception of criminal justice, Georgia has left public policy innovation to states like Florida, Indiana and Louisiana. With income tax, pension and major education funding reforms pushed to 2015, tort reform could be the issue that puts Georgia in the national spotlight. Sen. Brandon Beach’s Patient Injury Act would eliminate medical malpractice litigation. Democrats and Republicans alike acknowledge shortfalls in the current medical malpractice system. For the poor and middle… View Article
This op-ed appeared in the January 13, 2013 (Sunday edition) of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution By Kelly McCutchen Not everything is off limits to government in an economic recession. On the contrary, the challenge forces government to explore opportunities for fundamental reforms that improve efficiency and effectiveness in the long run. Below are ideas that, if implemented, could help position Georgia ideally for the future. Build on the bipartisan criminal justice reforms enacted in 2012 by reforming the juvenile justice system and protecting innocent owners and their property rights by reforming Georgia’s civil asset forfeiture law. Improve access to justice for victims of medical negligence with patient-centered tort reform. Georgia’s medical malpractice system works for trial lawyers and insurance companies, not… View Article
By Mike Klein The final breath has  been drawn by this year’s Georgia General Assembly.  Here is what lawmakers did on seven issues that are closely tracked by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation.  This article discusses state charter schools, digital learning, criminal justice and juvenile code reform, pension and tax reform and health care reform.  All of these will require more work going forward and in some cases, much more work starting soon. State Charter Schools This November voters will decide who got it right:  Lawmakers four years ago when they created a state charter schools commission or the state Supreme Court last spring when it ruled that the commission was unconstitutional.  The very fact that voters – not the… View Article
Governor Nathan Deal looked to the stars for guidance Tuesday evening as he delivered his second State of the State address before the General Assembly in Atlanta.  During a 42-minute address the Governor from Gainesville described his goal to achieve another world class medical college in Georgia, announced millions of new dollars for public education, threw a lifeline to former state commission charter schools and he put his stamp firmly onto corrections reform.  Before doing that, Deal turned to the stars. “Georgians have charged us to set a course for our state and they have defined the stars that we must follow to expand opportunity; the star of education – we must provide great schools that will cultivate the minds… View Article

The Foundation should take a lot of pride in your influence on Georgia governmental policy over the past several years. If you look back on several things that you were crying in the wilderness about several years ago, you will find that Governor Miller adopted them…your influence and your pressure on that process has been a major factor in governmental policy in Georgia. You should be congratulated.

Governor Sonny Perdue more quotes