Tag: Eric Wearne

Friday Facts: October 26, 2012

It’s Friday!  Quotes of Note “Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake.” – Napoleon Bonaparte “Just tell them that their wildest dreams will come true if they vote for you.” – Napoleon Dynamite Events January 24, 2013: Just one week after attending the national Transportation Research Board’s annual meeting, Robert W. Poole will keynote, “Moving Georgia Ahead: What’s Coming Down the Pike,” an 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast hosted by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. Poole, a Senior Fellow at the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, is a co-founder of the Reason Foundation and its director of transportation policy and Searle Freedom Trust Transportation Fellow. He will provide an update on… View Article
By Eric Wearne Digital Learning Now! Has just released the second paper in its “Smart Series.”  Here is a review of paper # 1.  This second installment makes the case for two improvements based on school data.  First, the authors argue that states should create a “data backpack” for each student, which would include a standardized electronic copy of their test and grade histories, their discipline records, their “personal bests” on various types of assignments, and other items, and which could be accessed and used as students move across grades, schools, districts, and states.  And second, they advocate a “Learner Profile,” which would be a set of experiences and resources built from the information in the data backpack, to… View Article
By Eric Wearne A kindergarten teacher in middle Georgia has earned $213,000 over the past three months.  No, Houston County has not started the largest bonus pay program ever.  No, this is not a scandal.  And no, this is not a trick; she didn’t win the lottery or even change jobs.  The teacher, Deanna Jump, earned that money through her own creative efforts, and through a new educational market in which teachers can sell lesson plans to each other online. According to Businessweek, “Deanna Jump is not a trust fund baby. She never married into money and she has never won the lottery. But in the past year-and-a-half, the 43-year-old kindergarten teacher in Warner Robins, Ga., has earned more… View Article

The Search for an Online Learning “Magic Bullet”

By Eric Wearne Economics writer Arnold Kling recently discussed his views in The American on likely future winners and losers in the education technology / online learning sector.  He has also thoughtfully written about online learning here, and here, for example. His thesis in The American article is that technologies that enable “one student [to receive] personalized instruction that comes from many educators” will be the real future of teaching, rather than technologies that allow one teacher to reach many more students. Given that approach, Kling bets against MOOCs, just as others are doubling down on that strategy.  Coursera has just doubled its list of partners, adding Emory, among many others.  (See also here and here regarding… View Article

What is the Future for Marginal Revolution University?

By Eric Wearne Add another entrant to the growing number of free online education start-ups (see here or here).  Marginal Revolution University comes from Tyler Cowen and Alex Tabarrok, two economics professors at George Mason University (and hosts of the economics blog Marginal Revolution). MRUniversity was announced at the World Bank meeting last week.  According to Tabarrok, “Here are a few of the principles behind MR University: 1. The product is free (like this blog), and we offer more material in less time. 2. Most of our videos are short, so you can view and listen between tasks, rather than needing to schedule time for them.  The average video is five minutes, twenty-eight seconds long.  When needed,… View Article

Drilling Down on Learning Tech and Who Pays For It

By Eric Wearne “For state and district leaders, it comes down to two decisions: what devices and who pays.”  These are always fundamental concepts surrounding the adoption and implementation of school technology.  A new paper by Digital Learning Now! attempts to address both. According to its website, Digital Learning Now! is “a national campaign to advance policies that will create a high quality digital learning environment to better prepare students with the knowledge and skills to succeed in college and careers.”  Convened in 2010, and currently co-chaired by former West Virginia Governor Bob Wise and former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, last week DLN released the first installment in its “Smart Series,” which is meant to be a “collection of interactive… View Article

Friday Facts: August 24, 2012

August 24, 2012  It’s Friday!  Quotes of Note  Correction: Two of the Quotes of Note in last week’s Friday Facts were incorrectly attributed to Benjamin Franklin and John Adams. Our apologies; as Abraham Lincoln said, “Don’t believe everything you read on the Internet!”  “I desire so to conduct the affairs of this administration that if at the end… I have lost every other friend on earth, I shall at least have one friend left, and that friend shall be down inside of me.” – Abraham Lincoln  “Posterity – you will never know how much it has cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you will make good use of it.” – John Adams  “Under this republic the rewards… View Article
By Eric Wearne Last fall, then-new Coahulla Creek High School in Whitfield County made a bold move and issued all of its students tablets rather than textbooks.  Now a new report by Learning Untethered titled “Learning is Personal,” noted by Getting Smart, takes a closer look at how tablets are actually used in some 5th grade classrooms over the course of a school year.  This is a “project,” rather than a full research paper, but it is a project schools might want to take note of.   The questions the authors asked were “whether handheld and tablet form factors are adequate for student production of content, or just consumption, and whether Android or iOS devices are more appropriate… View Article

Friday Facts: August 17, 2012

August 17, 2012 It’s Friday! Visit the Foundation’s new Web site at www.georgiapolicy.org then e-mail us at info@georgiapolicy.org to tell us what you think of it! Quotes of note “If Congress can do whatever in their discretion can be done by money, the Government is no longer a limited one, possessing enumerated powers, but an indefinite one, subject to particular exceptions.” – James Madison Events August 25: Join me a week from Saturday (August 25) at the E3 Summit in Kennesaw hosted by Americans For Prosperity Georgia. The conference will focus on the “3 E’s” driving Georgia’s future – economic freedom, educational choice and energy freedom. I will be on a panel discussing education reform, but the real stars include… View Article
By Eric Wearne The New Teacher Project (TNTP) is a national organization that “works with schools, districts and states to provide excellent teachers to the students who need them most and advance policies and practices that ensure effective teaching in every classroom.” TNTP recently published a report called “The Irreplaceables,” which discusses the “real retention crisis in America’s urban schools.”*  For the purposes of this report, TNTP defines “Irreplaceables” by looking at the value-added test data provided by four large urban school systems. Those whose students gained 5-6 more months of learning each year compared to lower-performing teachers were deemed “Irreplaceable” – about 20 percent of the teachers in each of the school systems TNTP examined. TNTP also… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has been doing important work for the free enterprise movement for the past 20 years.  I can assure you from the vantage of a non-profit think tank in Washington, D.C. with much the same principles as GPPF that the work we do simply would not be possible if it were not for the important work that GPPF does.  We see it, we understand it, it is an inspiration to us, it is the kind of thing that will translate into the important work that we can do in Washington, D.C.  We thank you very much for that.

Arthur Brooks, President, American Enterprise Institute (2011) more quotes