Friday Facts: June 5, 2015

What’s up, what’s down in transportation.

Friday Facts: April 24, 2015

How many states have embraced Education Savings Accounts?

Friday Facts: March 7, 2014

The new SAT appears to bear some strong similarities to the Common Core State Standards.

Foundation Celebrates as National School Choice Week Enters its Fourth Year with 5,500 Events

By Sherri Ackerman (January 20, 2014) In just four short years, National School Choice Week has mushroomed nationwide from 150 events in 2010 to 5,500 at last count this year, with much of the growth attributed to a positive message and a powerful way of delivering it. The Georgia Public Policy Foundation holds its annual School Choice Week celebration, a Leadership Breakfast, on Tuesday, January 28 at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. The event is open to the public; find out more at http://tinyurl.com/ovkzx7g. “We don’t want to tell anyone that one choice is better … Continue Reading →

Friday Facts: January 10, 2014

How does Georgia rank on K-12 student achievement?

Friday Facts: July 19, 2013

Seventy-one percent of small businesses say the Affordable Care Act makes it harder to hire.

Friday Facts: April 12, 2013

What are the biggest hurdles for new businesses? Find out in Friday Facts.

Friday Facts: February 8, 2013

What are the odds you’ll keep your employer-sponsored health plan?

Friday Facts: January 18, 2013

Should Georgia pursue a state-based health exchange or expand Medicaid?

Isaac Asimov Saw The Future of Learning Way Back in 1988

In 1988, Isaac Asimov was interviewed on PBS, and made some truly futuristic pronouncements about online learning (though he didn’t call it that at the time). For example, Asimov argued that, “Nowadays what people call learning is forced on you, and everyone is forced to learn the same thing on the same day at the same speed…,” and, he added, “Now, there’s the possibility of a one to one relationship for the many.”

Friday Facts: October 26, 2012

Did you now that between 1992-2009, Georgia’s student population grea 41 percent and school personnel grew 80 percent?

Would Student “Data Backpacks” Infringe on Civil Liberties?

Digital Learning Now! Has just released the second paper in its “Smart Series.” Here is a review of paper # 1. This second installment makes the case for two improvements based on school data. First, the authors argue that states should create a “data backpack” for each student, which would include a standardized electronic copy of their test and grade histories, their discipline records, their “personal bests” on various types of assignments, and other items, and which could be accessed and used as students move across grades, schools, districts, and states.

Deanna Jump’s Million Dollar Kindergarten Lesson Plans!

A kindergarten teacher in middle Georgia has earned $213,000 over the past three months.

What is the Future for Marginal Revolution University?

By Eric Wearne Add another entrant to the growing number of free online education start-ups (see here or here).  Marginal Revolution University comes from Tyler Cowen and Alex Tabarrok, two economics professors at George Mason University (and hosts of the economics blog Marginal Revolution). MRUniversity was announced at the World Bank meeting last week.  According to Tabarrok, “Here are a few of the principles behind MR University: 1. The product is free (like this blog), and we offer more material in less time. 2. Most of our videos are short, so you can view and listen … Continue Reading →

Friday Facts: August 24, 2012

Want to know about charter schools local control and minority students? Click on the links in the Friday Facts!

Friday Facts: August 17, 2012

Georgia could save $8 billion annually in health care costs, and as much as $3.5 billion on Medicaid alone, if it replaced its current medical liability system with a Patients’ Compensation System, according to a new study released this week.

Coursera and Georgia Tech Bend the Online Learning Curve

By Eric Wearne Events move quickly in the world of online learning.  As an example of how fast: online learning platform Coursera was founded in 2012.  Georgia Tech announced a partnership with Coursera this week. But Georgia Tech is not alone in this; Coursera is working with “elite” partners in the U.S. and other countries, to host MOOCs within each partner’s most highly regarded areas of expertise. According to Inside Higher Education, Coursera is creating a new market niche: “While Udacity has elected to team up with individual professors and edX has not announced any partners beyond … Continue Reading →

Task Force Should Focus on Digital Learning Ideas Marketplace

By Eric Wearne Recently Governor Nathan Deal announced a task force to “recommend ways to improve student achievement through the creation of robust digital learning environments, which may include the transition to digital textbooks and the effective use of wireless mobile devices.” In his remarks, the Governor stated that, “Students need to develop technical literacy in order to attain 21st century skills and become competitive in the global marketplace, and our state will invest in that education. We must increase the quality and quantity of our digital learning opportunities to … Continue Reading →

Another View of Georgia Charter Schools Report

By Kelly McCutchen, Mark Peevy, Dr. Ben Scafidi and Dr. Eric Wearne Last year, the Georgia Supreme Court closed the Georgia Charter Schools Commission and gave local school boards “exclusive” control over public education in Georgia. Now legislators are debating whether the state should be able to authorize start-up charter schools and whether the state should have any role in education other than writing checks to school boards. Georgia parents clearly want start-up charter schools: Last year more than 5,000 students were on waiting lists to attend the state’s few … Continue Reading →