Tag: environment

  By Benita M. Dodd Remember the notorious spotted owl? Listed in 1990 on the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA), the Northern Spotted Owl tied up timber-rich areas in knots as these 1-pound wood owls took precedence in management decisions. Despite the federal intervention, spotted owls have declined 40 percent over 25 years, jobs and timber sales dropped precipitously and, as a consequence, so did the tax proceeds from timber harvests in the Pacific Northwest. But Nature once again won’t be allowed to take its course. Now, according to Teresa Platts of the Property and Environment Research Council, the feds have their eye on another owl – the barred owl.  They’re moving forward with a million-dollar-a-year plan to shoot 9,000 View Article

EPA, Asthma and Mission Creep

By Benita M. Dodd   The federal Environmental Protection Agency is marking Asthma Awareness Month with its usual hooplah about how “cleaner air” will reduce asthma attacks and is honoring “leading asthma management programs for their efforts to improve the lives of people with asthma in underserved communities.” It’s true that asthma numbers are increasing. And that may once have been caused by outdoor air quality problems. But if the air quality was the issue, don’t you think that by now there would be fewer, not MORE people with asthma? After all, it’s the EPA that reports how air quality has improved over the decades. And yet … this is in the EPA’s press release today: “Today one out… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd “Climate change has many faces,” notes the Web site for Earth Day 2013, which takes place Monday, April 22. “A man in the Maldives worried about relocating his family as sea levels rise, a farmer in Kansas struggling to make ends meet as prolonged drought ravages the crops … the polar bear in the melting arctic, the tiger in India’s threatened mangrove forests. …” It’s a lengthy list. Unfortunately, it’s incomplete. It’s time to add a few more faces to the pitiful environment painted by Earth Day organizers. An entrepreneur and small business shouldering the regulatory burden. The Small Business Administration reports that compliance with environmental regulations costs small businesses 364 percent more than large… View Article

Friday Facts: April 19, 2013

 April 19, 2013  It’s Friday! Events April 23: Today is the deadline to register for, “Telehealth: Taking Health Care to The Next Level,” the Foundation’s next Leadership Breakfast, at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, April 23, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. The moderator is Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald of the Georgia Department of Public Health, with telemedicine expert panelists Dr. Jeffrey English, Dr. Jeffrey Grossman and Paula Guy of the Georgia Partnership for Telehealth. The cost is $25 to attend; register online at http://tinyurl.com/ck6v4yt. Find out more at www.georgiapolicy.org/?p=9075. (Attire: business, business casual.) Mark your calendar: The Foundation’s May 23 Leadership Breakfast at the Georgian Club will feature education entrepreneur Sajan George discussing, “The Future of View Article

Imposing Renewable Energy Won’t Work

(This commentary appeared in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s ‘Atlanta Forward’ of March 7, 2013) By Benita M. Dodd If at first you don’t succeed try, try again, goes the saying. Watching environmental groups eroding sound energy policy through death by a thousand cuts is a strong reminder. For years, alternative energy was promoted as preparation for “peak” oil. Domestic energy exploration was hindered to “protect the land.” Air and water pollution were cited to demonize coal. Then global warming/climate change was the reason to reduce coal and petroleum use. Policy-makers concerned about national security were urged to achieve energy independence, with no regard for how global markets operate. In this, biofuel profiteers have been complicit and protectionist. State governments were pressed… View Article

Pipeline from Canada Trickles Down to Georgia

By Benita M. Dodd Choosing between energy independence and energy security is like choosing between cherry pie and pie-in-the-sky: Only one is real. A 1,700-mile planned oil pipeline from Canada to Texas could bring security to this nation’s oil supply, but environmental activists and (more recently) “Occupy” types pushing for pie-in-the-sky independence from fossil fuel energy are doing everything they can to deny Americans energy security. The $7 billion Keystone XL pipeline would carry more than a half-million barrels of oil a day from the oil sands of Alberta, Canada, across several U.S. states to U.S. refineries in the Gulf.  It holds enormous promise for the United States, which imports about half of its oil. First, the Canadian-financed pipeline assures… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd The federal Environmental Protection Agency was in Atlanta on May 26 to hold a daylong hearing – one of just three nationwide – on its proposed Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) regulations for utilities. The passionate – if sometimes misguided – comments came from representatives of utilities, power plant neighbors, Native Americans, environmental activists, grassroots groups and the Georgia Public Policy Foundation. The Foundation’s comments focused on three aspects of the proposed MACT rules: The cost to industry and consumers in Georgia The time frame, both in the limited opportunity for analysis of the 945 pages of regulations and in the compliance deadline The basis for the EPA’s tougher regulations. The cost to industry and consumers: View Article

Tougher Air Standards Demand Sensible Solutions

By Benita M. Dodd Good news certainly is proving to be no news now that metro Atlanta’s 2003 ozone season has ended. After all, alarmists wouldn’t want residents to know that the 13-county metro area designated in non-attainment with federal air quality standards is doing quite well, thank you. Air quality has improved despite increasingly strident warnings; despite regional foot-dragging on congestion relief and a massive population, industry and automobile increase since the first two emissions monitors were installed in January 1981. Even so, confused residents are left trying to decipher whether the air indoors or outdoors is the healthier choice during the May-September ozone monitoring season. This year, the state Environmental Protection Division issued 18 color-coded smog day alerts,… View Article

As an employer, and a parent and a graduate of Georgia public schools, I am pleased that the Foundation has undertaken this project. (The report card) provides an excellent tool for parents and educators to objectively evaluate our public high schools. It will further serve a useful purpose as a benchmark for the future to measure our schools’ progress.

Dan Amos, CEO, AFLAC more quotes