Tag: Education

NCPA on Higher Education and Online Courses

A July 2016 Issue Brief by Christian Yiu of the National Center for Policy Analysis proposes accreditation reforms to allow for increases in the quality and quantity of online learning in higher education. The Issue Brief is below; for a PDF version that includes references, go to http://www.ncpa.org/pdfs/ib197.pdf. Higher Education and Accrediting Online Courses By Christian Yiu Traditional higher education is not meeting the needs of employers. For example, a survey by the data provider PayScale and the executive development firm Future Workplace found that 87 percent of graduates feel they are ready for the workforce, but only 50 percent of managers feel recent graduates are prepared for a full-time job. In addition, the cost of higher education is… View Article
By Benita Dodd The media hype surrounding the political parties’ national conventions spotlights the enormous discord created by personalities and politics as the presidential election approaches. Getting short shrift amid slogans and the scramble for dollars and votes are the policy proposals that will affect the lives of Americans — and Georgians — long after November 8. Many citizens dismiss the states’ impact on issues at the national level — federal taxes, immigration, the military and education policy, for example. Too many believe the answers depend on who is elected president and to Congress. It’s not always so. It behooves Georgians to pay close attention to innovative ideas closer to home. States are often incubators, testing life-enhancing policies that can… View Article

Friday Facts: July 8, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, the Legislature approved a constitutional amendment designating lottery funds for education purposes. Voters ratified it in 1992 and the lottery began in 1993. Over the years, the Georgia Lottery Corp. reports generating more than $17.4 billion for education. Tonight’s Mega Millions jackpot is $540 million; the pot has rolled over since March. Guide to the Issues 2016: Find out what the Foundation proposes on issues such as transportation, health care, education, taxes and more. Currently available online, each chapter includes principles for reform, facts on the issue, background information and, in most cases, positive solutions to the challenges facing Georgia.  Quotes of Note View Article

Friday Facts: July 1, 2016

July 1, 2016 It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, U.S. Rep. Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), the only Republican among Georgia’s 10 Congressmen and two senators, was the Minority Whip of the House. Both chambers were majority Democrat. Today, both chambers are majority Republican; the former Georgia Congressman and U.S. House Speaker is being mentioned as a running mate for presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump; both Georgia senators and 10 of the 14 Congressmen are Republican. U.S. Rep. John Lewis is the only current Georgia member from the 102nd Congress. Guide to the Issues 2016: Find out what the Foundation proposes on issues such as transportation, health care, education, taxes… View Article

Friday Facts: June 17, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, electronic messages were hardly the norm; the term “email” gained popularity by 1993. Today, According to the Harvard Business Review, email takes up 23 percent of the average employee’s workday and, collectively, we send more than 108 billion emails a day in the United States. Guide to the Issues 2016, compiled by the Foundation, is now available online. Each chapter includes principles for reform, facts on the issue, background information and, in most cases, positive solutions to the challenges facing Georgia.  Quotes of Note  “The laws that forbid the carrying of arms are laws of such a nature. They disarm only those… View Article

The Politics of School Choice

You are invited to join the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Education Economics Center at Kennesaw State University at 7:30 a.m. Monday, June 6 for, “The Politics of School Choice,”  a Leadership Breakfast keynoted by Jay P. Greene, national education expert. The event will take place in Room 278 of the Burruss Building at Kennesaw State University in Cobb County. Parking is available in the visitors’ lot. Registration for this Leadership Breakfast is $20 and includes a Chick-fil-A breakfast. Register online here.   (Difficulty registering? E-mail benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org.) Media interested in attending must contact Benita Dodd at benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org or 404-256-4050. Jay P. Greene is Distinguished Professor and Head of the Department of Education Reform at the… View Article

Friday Facts: June 3, 2016

It’s Friday! Events  Monday, June 6: “The Politics of School Choice” is a Leadership Breakfast keynoted by national education expert Jay Greene and sponsored by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Education Economics Center at Kennesaw State University. 7:30 a.m., Room 278, Burruss Building, Kennesaw State University. Parking available in the visitors’ lot. $20 includes event and Chick-fil-A breakfast. Register online here.  Also on June 6, Dr. Greene’s 9:30-10:45 a.m. lecture, “The Foolishness of Trying to Regulate Our Way to School Improvement,” is open to the public. Burruss Building, Room 151. Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, 358,333 Georgians were on welfare (AFDC), compared… View Article

Friday Facts: May 27, 2016

It’s Friday! Events  Monday, June 6: “The Politics of School Choice” is a Leadership Breakfast keynoted by national education expert Jay Greene and sponsored by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Education Economics Center at Kennesaw State University. 7:30 a.m., Room 278, Burruss Building, Kennesaw State University. Parking available in the visitors’ lot. $20 includes event and Chick-fil-A breakfast. Register online here. Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, we reported the percentage of education dollars used for classroom instruction had gone from 76 percent in 1970 to 52 percent in 1990. Today, instruction spending is 54-58 percent (depending on how broadly “instruction” is defined.) Meanwhile, from… View Article

Friday Facts: May 13, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, more than nine in 10 U.S. households had a landline (93.3 percent) for phone service. Today, 96.3 percent of households have phone service, but nearly half of those households (47 percent) have dumped their landlines for wireless service onlyHappy Birthday Hayek! Nobel economist Friedrich Hayek was born 117 years ago this week. His explanation of how “local knowledge” or decentralization is superior to central planning is relatable given our continued top-down regulatory approach in the Internet Age, where local knowledge can be shared easily (Yelp, FaceBook, etc.): If we can agree that the economic problem of society is mainly one of… View Article

Does More Money Improve Outcomes?

Fifty years ago, James S. Coleman published a groundbreaking education report that many call the fountainhead for those committed to evidence-based education policy. Among other things, Coleman found that variations in per-pupil expenditure had little correlation with student outcomes. Even to this day, there remains the simple question as to whether, other things equal, just adding more money to schools will systematically lead to higher achievement. Figure 2 shows the overall record of states during the past quarter century. Changes in real state spending per pupil are uncorrelated with changes in 4th-grade student achievement in reading. Similar results are obtained in math and in both math and reading at the 8th-grade level. Clearly, states have changed in many other ways… View Article

It’s so often a lack of information that keeps us from getting involved. The Foundation is doing for the public what many could not do for themselves. Anytime that we’re given the truth, people can make good decisions.

Deen Day Smith, Chairman of the Board, Cecil B. Day Investment Company more quotes