Friday Facts: February 1, 2013

Georgia law enforcement agencies seize millions of dollars in assets every year from people who are never even charged with, much less convicted of, a crime.

Friday Facts: January 25, 2012

What’s with the woobies? National School Choice Week 2013 begins today.

Friday Facts: December 21, 2012

Government using taxpayer dollars to hire someone to get government to give more taxpayer dollars to government = Big Government.

Friday Facts: December 7, 2012

In the 1970s, when the top rate on wage and salary income was 50 % and 70% on investment income, high earners spent much of their time and energy seeking tax shelters, Michael Barone points out.

The Unique Challenge of Georgia Juvenile Repeat Crime

By Mike Klein The devil is always in the details and sometimes details are like trying to put lipstick on a pig.  The recidivism rate for Georgia juveniles is a case in point. One-in-two juveniles leave the system and do not return within three years.  But one-in-two are back within three years, usually because of a new crime, violation of a court order or a probation offense.  There is a cash cost for that level of failure and there also is a human cost. When the Special Council on Criminal … Continue Reading →

The Final Breath From This Year’s General Assembly

By Mike Klein The final breath has  been drawn by this year’s Georgia General Assembly.  Here is what lawmakers did on seven issues that are closely tracked by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation.  This article discusses state charter schools, digital learning, criminal justice and juvenile code reform, pension and tax reform and health care reform.  All of these will require more work going forward and in some cases, much more work starting soon. State Charter Schools This November voters will decide who got it right:  Lawmakers four years ago when … Continue Reading →

Second Version of Criminal Justice Reform Is Better Law

By Mike Klein The second version of criminal justice reform legislation is better than its earlier cousin because of what the bill does not include – hundreds of lines of rules and regulations about how to run the state probation and parole programs. The absence of a legislative mandate means there would be more flexibility to expand programs that work and jettison those that are found to be wanting.  One example is electronic monitoring which is being successfully developed inside the state parole program. The House was expected to debate … Continue Reading →

Ten Years Later Georgia Still Seeking Drug Abuse Options

By Mike Klein There are many different kinds of snakes and though I like none of them, I am willing to concede that some can attack and kill you while others are mostly just a nuisance.  The part that I am not quite so good at is figuring out which snakes to fear and which snakes to just closely monitor. A lot of folks in Georgia are trying to figure out which drug abusers to fear and which to just closely monitor.  It is an inexact science that no doubt … Continue Reading →

Corrections Reform: Do We Prefer Taxpayers or Tax Burdens?

Originally published April 21, 2010 Each day across Georgia, the state Department of Corrections prepares three meals per day to feed a population that is nearly equal to the number of residents living in Marietta.  It takes thousands of pounds of food to feed nearly 60,000 adult prisoners.  Paying for all that food served at 31 state prisons costs taxpayers $1 billion per year, including the cost to manage 150,000 parolees. This month the PEW Center on the States reported the first year-to-year drop in state prison population since 1972. … Continue Reading →

U.S. Justice Says Local Jail Populations Decline Nationally

Originally published April 26, 2011 County and city jail populations have declined nationally for two consecutive years, according to just published data from the U.S. Justice Department, but newer state data shows the Atlanta Fulton County jail is once again busting at the seams and operating beyond its capacity. The federal government’s annual survey reported 2009 to 2010 local jail population changes were just the second decline since the report began in 1982. The survey tracks almost three-quarter million men and women who are incarcerated somewhere other than state or … Continue Reading →

Right on Crime Sees Georgia as Ready for Reform

Atlanta – Right on Crime, a nationwide criminal justice reform initiative, today launched a state-based effort in Georgia to educate policy-makers about the commonsense corrections system reforms that have safely contained prison costs in states like Texas. The announcement comes in advance of Georgia’s Criminal Justice Reform Council releasing its recommendations for the Legislature in November 2011. “Today, almost a half million people are under correctional control in Georgia, costing the state more than $1 billion annually,” said Kelly McCutchen, president and CEO of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and … Continue Reading →