Tag: coal

The most climate-friendly reliable source of power is nuclear energy, yet environmental activists largely campaign against nuclear. Michael Shellenberger shares the fascinating history and motives of activists’ opposition in, “CLEAN ENERGY IS ON THE DECLINE — HERE’S WHY, AND WHAT WE CAN DO ABOUT IT,” in Public Utilities Fortnightly. Shellenberger writes: Utilities that own nuclear power plants are in serious financial trouble. While it is tempting to blame low natural gas prices and misplaced post-Fukushima jitters, nuclear’s troubles are rooted in regulatory capture — a capture that finds its genesis in the origins of the U.S. environmental movement. This capture is now threatening to bring this climate-friendly energy source to the brink. … How then did environmentalists come to view… View Article

Snake Oil in the Clean Power Plan

By Benita M. Dodd “The most terrifying words in the English language are: I’m from the government and I’m here to help,” Ronald Reagan famously said. After new energy regulations were announced this week, Americans should ask government, “With friends like you, who needs enemies?” This nation has never been sold a bigger, costlier bill of goods than the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan (climate action plan) to reduce carbon emissions, which the administration has fervently tried to relabel as carbon “pollution.” According to President Obama: With this Clean Power Plan, by 2030, carbon pollution from our power plants will be 32 percent lower than it was a decade ago.  And the nerdier way to say that is that… View Article
Benita Dodd testified on July 29 at the Atlanta Field Hearing of the Environmental Protection Agency regarding the Clean Power Plan. This is her official testimony, a written copy of which was submitted to the EPA. By Benita M. Dodd According to the Federal Register, on December 7, 2009, the EPA “found” that current and projected concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) in the atmosphere threaten the public health and welfare of current and future generations. Unfortunately, this finding and the EPA’s subsequent action threaten the public health and welfare of current and future generations of Georgians far more than greenhouse gases do.  The EPA declares the goal of its Clean Power Plan is to cut “carbon pollution” from the power… View Article

Nuclear Power Can Balance Energy Demand

Despite America’s abundance of natural gas from shale production, some parts of the country have already had warnings that over-dependence on gas for electricity generation exposes consumers to soaring prices for electricity, writes Mark Perry in the Investor’s Business Daily of January 16, 2014. The problem is the declining use of coal and nuclear power, the two sources of electricity that provide the greatest price stability and serve as a hedge against wide fluctuations in gas prices, according to Perry, a professor of economics at the Flint campus of the University of Michigan and a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. Among his comments: For the power industry to become increasingly dependent on a fuel with a history… View Article

Proposed CO2 Standards: Expensive Hot Air

By Benita M. Dodd (This commentary is the basis for testimony by Benita Dodd on behalf of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation at the EPA Listening Session on 111(d) Carbon Pollution Standards for Existing Power Plants in Atlanta on October 23 and was submitted in full to the EPA.) The Foundation believes that tougher standards on carbon dioxide emissions being proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency and under discussion at the EPA’s 11 listening sessions around the nation will have unfortunate consequences for the United States. This nation holds the world’s largest estimated recoverable reserves of coal; in fact, the United States is a net exporter of coal. In 2012, 81 percent of the coal produced in the nation was… View Article

Acid Rain Cleans Up Its Act

By Harold Brown Over the decades it’s become clear that an environmental crisis is the media’s baby; environmental progress is an orphan. Acid rain was an environmental calamity in the 1980s, claiming much media and public attention. The New York Times printed 338 articles with “acid rain” in the headline from 1975 to 2009; 85 percent were in the 1980s, an average of 29 per year. Some congressmen were up in arms about the “crisis.” U.S. Rep. Henry Waxman of California wrote in the Baltimore Sun in 1983 that rain as acid as vinegar was falling in virtually every state, “corrupting our natural resources” and “eating away at our buildings, automobiles and monuments.” These days, acid rain barely musters a… View Article

Facts on Energy

The National Center for Policy Analysis reports: The Institute of Energy Research recently published Hard Factsan energy primer that seeks to correct myths that shroud current debate surrounding energy. Domestically, the United States has enough of fossil fuels to last for centuries. In 2011, the United States produced 23 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, making it the world’s top producer. In the same year, the United States produced 5.67 million barrels of oil per day, becoming a third largest oil producer. Proved worldwide reserves of conventional oil doubled from 642 billion barrels in 1980 to 1.3 trillion barrels in 2009. The United States has 261 billion tons of coal in proved reserves, making it the most in… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is our state’s leading organization promoting government transparency. The Secretary of State’s office shares the Foundation’s commitment to transparency and responsible stewardship of taxpayer dollars, which is why our agency was the first in Georgia to publish its budget and spending data on a public transparency website.

Karen Handel, Georgia Secretary of State more quotes