Tag: Cato

By Robert Krol Each year, state and local governments decide on which transportation infrastructure projects to build. Often, priority goes to projects directed at reducing highway congestion or air pollution. The economic backbone of the decision process is supposed to be an objective cost-benefit analysis. However, calculating the costs and benefits of any major project is technically difficult. Cost estimates require a determination of labor and material quantities and prices. Benefit estimates require forecasting economic growth, demographic trends, and travel patterns in the region. Clouding the analysis is the fact that this decision process takes place in a political environment. Politicians love the publicity they get at the opening of a high-occupancy vehicle lane or the expansion of a mass… View Article
Dear Friend, (Don’t you hate those letters that make you wait until the very end to find out what people really want from you? I do! So … As you read this, please know that tomorrow is Giving Tuesday and a good opportunity to support your Georgia Public Policy Foundation.) I dug up a photograph over the weekend I’ll call, “think tanks, the early days.” It was taken in 2003 at my first annual State Policy Network conference of state think tanks. In it, I’m flanked by two champions of liberty, Jo Kwong of the international Atlas Foundation and Joe Lehman of Michigan’s Mackinac Center. Jo, now at the Philanthropy Roundtable, and Joe, now president at Mackinac, have become good… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has been doing important work for the free enterprise movement for the past 20 years.  I can assure you from the vantage of a non-profit think tank in Washington, D.C. with much the same principles as GPPF that the work we do simply would not be possible if it were not for the important work that GPPF does.  We see it, we understand it, it is an inspiration to us, it is the kind of thing that will translate into the important work that we can do in Washington, D.C.  We thank you very much for that.

Arthur Brooks, President, American Enterprise Institute (2011) more quotes