Tag: Analysis

The Marietta Daily Journal’s editorial in the Sunday edition of September 25, 2016 quoted Georgia Public Policy Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd on the cost of consultants in Cobb County. (Dodd is a resident of Cobb County and the Foundation’s offices, too, are in Cobb.) The editorial is reprinted below in its entirety and can be accessed online at http://www.mdjonline.com/opinion/a-parks-consultant-can-t-we-ever-make-up-our/article_916afd20-81ef-11e6-b880-b3e0f19b51d0.html A parks consultant? Can’t we ever make up our own minds? Like a farmer hollering “Sooie!” as he empties the slop bucket into the trough, Cobb County showers consultants with expensive contracts every month. Take last week, when commissioners agreed to pay $224,000 to Lose & Associates Inc. to develop a “comprehensive master plan” for Cobb’s Parks, Recreation and Cultural… View Article

How Government Can Speed Broadband Access

By Kelly McCutchen Internet access is foundational in today’s economy. Lack of access can grind business to a halt and hobble critical services including health care, transportation and education. As a result, forward-thinking telecommunication policy is a priority in making Georgia a great place to live and economically competitive. Georgia still has work to do to increase access to broadband but the news is good: Statewide, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) reports show, 87 percent of Georgians have access to wired broadband connections with speeds of 25 megabits per second (mbps) or higher and 93 percent have access to speeds of 10 mbps or higher. A whopping 99 percent of Georgia’s population has access to wireless broadband of 10 mbps or… View Article

Checking Up On Health: August 17, 2016

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd   I visited Canada briefly over the weekend, driving into Windsor, Ontario, from Detroit. Did you know? The first eatery visible after you cross the Ambassador Bridge into Canada is a McDonald’s; the second is a Popeye’s! What was really interesting, however, was the proliferation of pharmacies in Windsor. I assume — I can’t vouch for it — that it’s as a convenience for U.S. citizens who want to zip over there to purchase Canada’s lower-priced prescription drugs. That began a discussion in the car about why Canada drugs are cheaper: lower prices because of the government’s buying power there as opposed to private negotiations in the United States, fewer choices… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd August marks the 20th anniversary of the transformative Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act. This bipartisan welfare reform legislation signed by President Bill Clinton on August 22, 1996, dramatically transformed the nation’s welfare system, implementing strong welfare-to-work requirements and incentivizing states to transition welfare recipients into work. The law, which created Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and replaced the 61-year-old Aid to Families with Dependent Children, also implemented stricter food stamp regulations. Those included time limits for some recipients and a lifetime ban for drug felons, which states could opt out of. (Wisely, Georgia finally opted out this year, with Gov. Nathan Deal signing criminal justice reform legislation that allows drug felons to receive food… View Article
By John R. Graham Ready for some good news on health reform? Both the presumptive Democratic candidate for President and the Republican majority in the U.S. House of Representatives agree people should be able to spend more money directly on medical care without insurance companies meddling. Both sides would be shocked to have their respective health reforms described as sharing any common ground. However, identifying this common ground might be necessary if either side wants to fix the worst aspects of Obamacare. If Republican politicians in Congress want to give people any relief from the burden of Obamacare, they need to be prepared for the possibility they will have to deal with Hillary Clinton’s White House next year. Speaker… View Article

Bumps in Study on Speed Humps

By Randal O’Toole and Kathleen Calongne A recent paper purporting to show that speed humps make residential streets safer for children actually shows nothing of the kind. In fact, the study’s data can even be interpreted to mean that humps make streets more dangerous. Speed humps are annoying and potentially dangerous to drivers and can cause deadly delays to emergency service vehicles. But an Oakland, Calif., study (seehttp://www.ajph.org/cgi/content/abstract/94/4/646) claims to show that speed humps make streets 50 to 60 percent safer for children. The study used a database showing when and where 1,600 speed humps were installed on Oakland streets between 1995 and 2000. Ideally, the researchers would have compared accident rates on those streets before the speed… View Article

“I am here today to thank the Georgia Public Policy Foundation for your role in building a fiscally conservative, pro-growth state. Not only did you help pave the way for a new generation of leadership, you continue to provide key policy advice and to hold us accountable to the principles we ran on. In short, you have had a transforming influence on this state. We are healthier, stronger, and better managed because of your efforts.

State Senator Eric Johnson, President pro tempore, Georgia State Senate more quotes