Category: The Forum

Managed Lanes, The Untolled Story

By Ron Sifen As schools wind down and summer travel begins, commuters are thrilled to see weekday traffic improve on metro Atlanta streets and interstates. What many north metro motorists have begun to notice over the past year, however, is the overall, incremental improvement in their weekday commutes. How is that happening? According to the Georgia Department of Transportation, since the opening of the reversible express toll lanes alongside I-75 and I- 575 north of I-285, enough commuters are choosing to pay the tolls that it’s making an enormous difference to traffic flow in the general-purpose lanes. The improvement is reflected in the data. The department compared the average traffic performance from January to February 2018 – before the toll… View Article

Friday Facts: May 24, 2019

It’s Friday!  Mark your calendar! The 2019 Georgia Legislative Policy Forum will take place on Friday, November 15, at the Renaissance Waverly Atlanta. Details to follow; click here to view video coverage of previous events. Quotes of note  “In many intellectual and political circles, the pursuit of profits is seen as evil. However, this pursuit forces entrepreneurs to find ways to either please people efficiently or go bankrupt. Of course, they could mess up and avoid bankruptcy if they can get government to bail them out or give them protection against competition.” – Walter Williams “Of course, not every charter school is good. Not every charter school is a success. But if there has ever existed anything like… View Article

An Education on Public Charter Schools in Georgia

By Benita M. Dodd National Charter Schools Week, held May 12-18, is a worthwhile celebration: More than a quarter-century ago, the nation’s first charter school opened in Minnesota; more than 20 years ago, Georgia’s first start-up charter school was authorized. So how is it that so many Georgians remain unaware or, worse, are antipathetic, when it comes to this education option for nearly 75,000 Georgia students? Some parents are even unaware even that charter schools are, in fact, public schools, a failing that has led choice advocates to employ the term “public charter schools.” And when overburdened news reporters are spoon-fed by anti-choice advocates, this often perpetuates the myths that charter schools: steal the cream of the crop from… View Article

Friday Facts: May 17, 2019

It’s Friday! Events  May 23THE DEADLINE IS TUESDAY! Register now for “You Can Say That: How Courage Can Defeat Political Correctness,” a noon Policy Briefing Luncheon with David French of the National Review Institute, on Thursday, May 23. Georgian Club. $35. Information and registration here. Mark your calendar! The 2019 Georgia Legislative Policy Forum will take place on Friday, November 15. Details to follow; click here to view video coverage of previous events. Quotes of note “May 17, 2019, marks the 65th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education decision. … Popular names associated with this historic decision – Thurgood Marshall, Daisy Bates, Earl Warren, and Kenneth Clarke – will receive… View Article
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution published an op-ed by Kyle Wingfield, president and CEO of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, in its Sunday edition of May 5, 2019. The op-ed, “Waivers can be powerful tool to cover uninsured here,” can be accessed on the newspaper’s website at https://www.ajc.com/news/opinion/opinion-waivers-can-powerful-tool-cover-uninsured-here/ZsnKhbuy8vIghoLCAnIMEO/. It is published in full below. Waivers can be a powerful tool to cover uninsured here  By Kyle Wingfield Despite years of political fighting and infighting, Congress remains at an impasse over how to fix our healthcare markets. That’s because no single healthcare law will suit 325 million Americans. There are too many differences in health conditions and market conditions, in problems as well as resources and opportunities. As Gov. Brian… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd Georgia’s thriving economy is drawing more people into the state. A visible effect is the increase in traffic and congestion. Less visible is the soaring demand for housing, especially in metro Atlanta. As housing demand grows, so does the cost of buying and renting. With more people competing for the available homes in the metro area, homeowners can afford to price them higher and landlords can ask higher rents. Lower-income hopefuls are forced to move farther away from jobs, increasing their commutes and raising the cost of transportation. Government bureaucrats feel obliged to step in as teachers, first responders and service-industry workers struggle to find homes they can afford near their jobs. The inclination is to… View Article

Friday Facts: May 10, 2019

It’s Friday!  Events  May 23: The deadline is Tuesday, May 21, to register for “You Can Say That: How Courage Can Defeat Political Correctness,” a noon Policy Briefing Luncheon with David French of the National Review Institute, on Thursday, May 23. Georgian Club. $35. Information and registration here. Quotes of note  “The great virtue of a free market system is that it does not care what color people are; it does not care what their religion is; it only cares whether they can produce something you want to buy. It is the most effective system we have discovered to enable people who hate one another to deal with one another and help one another.” – Milton View Article
News Release | For Immediate Release May 7, 2019 Contact: Benita Dodd at benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org (404-256-4050) Georgia Public Policy Foundation Adds Development Associate Kennedy Atkins to Staff Atlanta – Kennedy Atkins, a native of Birmingham, Ala., and graduate of Samford University, has joined the Georgia Public Policy Foundation as a Development Associate. Atkins graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science and a minor in French. His internships included stints at the Alabama Policy Institute (a sister think tank to the Georgia Public Policy Foundation), with Alabama State Rep. Jack Williams, and with DirectPath, which helps employees manage their health care benefits, before his December 2018 graduation. He also worked as a venue manager for a catering company. Atkins will assist… View Article

Still Asking for Whom Georgia’s Roads are Tolled?

By Benita M. Dodd The toll lanes are coming! The toll lanes are coming! Despite a lengthy history of tolling in Georgia, many current residents appear intimidated or uninformed about the state’s expanding toll lanes: how they work, what they do and whether to use them. Opposition misinformation also influences perceptions as memories and tales of the days of tolls fade. Recent recollections begin with the SR 400 toll plaza. The 50-cent fee was ended in 2013 by Governor Nathan Deal, who said he was keeping the state’s promise to end the toll once the construction bond was retired. Some people remember the 35-cent causeway toll onto St. Simons Island, which ended in 2003. (Jekyll Island calls its $6 toll… View Article

Friday Facts: May 3, 2019

It’s Friday!  Events  May 23: “You Can Say That: How Courage Can Defeat Political Correctness,” a noon Policy Briefing Luncheon with David French of the National Review Institute, on Thursday, May 23. Register by May 21. Georgian Club. $35. Information and registration here. Quotes of note “No people will tamely surrender their Liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when knowledge is diffused and virtue is preserved. On the contrary, when people are universally ignorant, and debauched in their manners, they will sink under their own weight without the aid of foreign invaders.” – Samuel Adams (1775) “For the most part, proposals being marketed as ‘Medicare for All’ or ‘Medicare Buy-in’ aren’t really expansions of… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has forged over the years many positive changes in Georgia, in its nonpartisan but very specific way.

U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson more quotes