Category: The Forum

By Eric Tresh Communications service providers offer voice, video and Internet access services to customers throughout Georgia. These services are provided by a number of different types of companies using a variety of broadband technologies. For example, telecommunications, satellite and Internet companies now offer video programming service. In addition, cable providers often have subsidiaries that provide voice services and a number of companies use the Internet to provide audio and video conferencing services. These services all benefit consumers and enhance productivity throughout the state. In addition to the benefits for consumers, broadband services are significant drivers of Georgia’s economy. Broadband providers invest hundreds of millions of dollars each year into Georgia’s economy, creating jobs and enhancing infrastructure. While technology has… View Article

Friday Facts: November 5th, 2010

It’s Friday!   Notable It’s not too late to register for the Georgia Legislative Policy Briefing on Saturday, Nov. 13. This daylong event features dozens of national and statewide experts on the top issues facing the state’s elected officials. Don’t miss a day of dynamic speakers and innovative ideas, sponsored by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Conservative Policy Leadership Institute. Click here and reserve your spot now! Keynote speakers are former West Virginia Governor Bob Wise on, “The Power of Digital Learning for Georgia and the Country,” and the Wall Street Journal’s Stephen Moore on, “How to Make Georgia the Most Economically Competitive State in the Nation.” Find out more here: http://tinyurl.com/2cmyy3x. Quotable – “Removing the snake… View Article

Value-Added in NYC

Last week NYC Chancellor Joel Klein proposed publishing individual teachers' value-added data, L.A. Times-style. Current teacher evaluation systems do not take student achievement into account. That's a given.  Value-added models (VAM), which attempt to measure how much of an effect individual teachers have on students' test scores are potentially very useful as part of a re-worked teacher evaluation system. These data could be useful for promotion, dismissal and other reward decisions. But there are some items that should be discussed more often up front: First, to calculate a VAM score, a teacher has to teach a class to which a standardized test is attached. In Georgia, as in many states, that means that a VAM could only touch somewhere… View Article

Repeal or Replace? How About New Ideas?

Health care needs reform and the American people have now clearly indicated what passed Congress last year is not what they want. Rather than gridlock, let's try to find better answers. Our Senior Fellow John Goodman is full of them in his blog post today: As I explained at Kaiser Health News the other day, in thinking about what can be done, it’s helpful to review who won and lost under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The big winners under the bill passed last spring are most (but certainly not all) of the 32 million newly insured plus some people with high health care costs. Let’s generously peg that at 50 million. The other 250 million are going to… View Article

Schools Should Look to Online Options Before Cutting Foreign Language and AP Courses

Tom Vander Ark writes that online offerings can help schools address tight budgets without reducing course options for students. The Georgia Virtual School run by the Georgia Department of Education offers 22 AP classes and six foreign languages including Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Spanish and Latin. Some districts are cutting subjects like foreign language. EdWeek points to a WI example. ”According to a recent study, schools across the nation are doing the same—eliminating foreign language instruction and undermining a skill that economists and educators agree is one of the most overlooked but essential navigation skills in a global economy.” One of the benefits of online learning is that states and districts can expand offerings and save money. Every district should… View Article

Friday Facts: October 29th, 2010

October 29, 2010   It’s Friday!   Quotable – “Always vote for principle, though you may vote alone, and you may cherish the sweetest reflection that your vote is never lost.” – John Quincy Adams – “Perhaps the fact that we have seen millions voting themselves into complete dependence on a tyrant has made our generation understand that to choose one’s government is not necessarily to secure freedom.” – Friedrich August Hayek   What’s happening at the Foundation – Register now: Saturday, Nov. 13, is the Georgia Legislative Policy Briefing, a daylong event featuring national and statewide experts on the top issues facing the state’s elected officials. Don’t miss a day of dynamic speakers and innovative ideas, sponsored by the… View Article

Friday Facts: October 15th, 2010

It’s Friday!  Quotable – “In an open economy, you will never know what is out there on the leading developmental edge of this or that industry. But the reality behind the miracles is the same: Someone innovates something useful, makes money from it, and re-innovates, or someone else trumps their innovation. Most of the time, no one notices. All it does is create jobs, wealth and well-being. But without this system running in the background, without the year-over-year progress embedded in these capitalist innovations, those trapped miners [in Chile] would be dead.” – Daniel Henninger, Wall Street Journal   Great Georgia! – Congratulations to Oscar Poole, whose famous Poole’s Bar-B-Q restaurant in Ellijay just set a 21-year record for sales … View Article

Friday Facts: October 22nd, 2010

It’s Friday!   Quotable – “There is no good reason to think the [Federal Communications Commission] should engineer electronic devices and interfaces based on its own views about what technologies and applications work best. Nor is there good reason to trust the FCC’s predictions about what kinds of investments cable operators and device manufacturers should risk in research and marketing for devices and interfaces to meet future consumer demands.” –  Seth L. Cooper, Free State Foundation – “From the President on down, the only proffered rationale for putting tens and eventually hundreds of billions of tax dollars into HSR (high-speed rail) is that … ‘people want high-speed rail.’ Well, people may want a door-to-door limo service paid for by… View Article

Friday Facts: October 8th, 2010

It’s Friday! Quotable – “What progressives want to do is take money from some – by force – and spend it on others. It sounds less noble when plainly stated. That’s the moral side of the matter. There’s a practical side, too. Taxes discourage wealth creation. That hurts everyone, the lower end of the income scale most of all. An economy that, through freedom, encourages the production of wealth raises the living standards of lower-income people as well as everyone else.” – John Stossel – “The Senate has passed a new bill that requires TV stations to lower the volume level on commercials. This is great, a hundred of the most powerful people in the nation have managed to… View Article

Friday Facts: October 1st, 2010

It’s Friday!   What’s happening at the Foundation – Mark your calendar: Saturday, Nov. 13, is the Georgia Legislative Policy Briefing, a daylong event featuring national and statewide experts on the top issues facing the state’s elected officials. Don’t miss a day of dynamic speakers and innovative ideas, sponsored by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Conservative Policy Leadership Institute. Reserve your spot now to get the early registration discount. Keynote speakers include former West Virginia Governor Bob Wise on, “The Power of Digital Learning for Georgia and the Country” and the Wall Street Journal’s Stephen Moore on, “How to Make Georgia the Most Economically Competitive State in the Nation.” – It’s good, it’s fresh, it’s free! Have you… View Article

As an employer, and a parent and a graduate of Georgia public schools, I am pleased that the Foundation has undertaken this project. (The report card) provides an excellent tool for parents and educators to objectively evaluate our public high schools. It will further serve a useful purpose as a benchmark for the future to measure our schools’ progress.

Dan Amos, CEO, AFLAC more quotes