Category: News

Ahead of the legislative session, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution published an op-ed by Benita Dodd, vice president of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, in its Sunday edition of January 8, 2017. The op-ed is reprinted in full below; find it online hereLawmakers should focus on gov’t. reforms that boost state’s well-being OPINION By Benita M. Dodd Opportunity is knocking as the door opens on Georgia’s 2017-18 legislative session. In a state with a Republican governor since 2002 and GOP majorities in both chambers since 2004, it’s time for legislators to welcome policy reforms that can improve income, opportunity and well-being. In 2014, the Legislature capped the personal income tax rate at 6 percent. That’s a start. But legislators ignored… View Article

The Top Ten in 2016!

What were the commentaries that most intrigued the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s readers in 2016? We looked back and tracked the top 10 trending items through the year. Here’s the countdown: 10. Applying the Lessons of Criminal Justice Reform to Health Care. Read it here. 9. Welfare-to-Work Helps Georgians Up and Out of Dependency. Read it here.  8. Beyond Medicaid: Health Care for Low-Income Georgians. Read it here. 7. Rome’s Free Clinic: Community Taking Charge. Read it here.  6. Transit’s Future is in Innovation, Not in Trains. Read it here. 5. Few Bright Spots Under The Gold Dome. Read it here. 4. Criminal Justice Reform Unshackles Georgians. Read it here. 3. Poverty Solutions… View Article
Ed Noble, an Atlanta visionary and developer of Lenox Square, one of the nation’s first shopping centers, died on December 4, 2016 at age 88. Mr. Noble was a member of the founding board of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation. We appreciate his support and offer our condolences to his friends, family and colleagues.  Below is the obituary for Mr. Noble that was published in The Atlanta  Journal-Constitution. Lenox Square visionary changed Atlanta retail Noble developed one of nation’s 1st shopping centers By Elissa McCrary For the AJC Edward Noble had a vision that changed retailing forever. He was just 28 when he moved to Atlanta in the 1950s with a plan to develop Lenox Square Shopping Center in Buckhead,… View Article
GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION NEWS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE December 16, 2016 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Foundation Celebrates 25 Years, Honors Dr. Michael H. Mescon Atlanta – The Georgia Public Policy Foundation, a state-focused, free-market public policy research organization, marked 25 years in Georgia in 2016 with an Anniversary Celebration Dinner and Freedom Award Ceremony on November 11 attended by 250 friends and supporters. The keynote speaker for the event at the Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre in Atlanta was John Stossel of Fox Business Network, 19-time Emmy Award recipient and the host of “Stossel,” a weekly program on Fox Business News. The prestigious Freedom Award, presented by the Foundation to a notable Georgian who has exemplified… View Article
Twenty-five years. A quarter of a century. It’s hard to believe the Georgia Public Policy Foundation has been around that long. In exactly one month – November 11 – we’re having a birthday celebration, keynoted by John Stossel of Fox Business Network. I hope you’ve received our invitation and plan to join us. I took a stroll down Memory Lane today and visited our Friday Fax archives, reading some from back when we faxed them to donors on a weekly basis. (Now they’re the “Friday Facts,” and if you’re reading this, you’re on the list already!) One Friday Fax, January 22, 1999, we devoted entirely to President Bill Clinton’s budget. We reminded our readers how he said,… View Article

Reacting to the 2015 FBI Crime Report

By Ross Coker Atlanta – The FBI released its comprehensive report on 2015 crime and crime rates across the nation today (September 26). The report, “Crime in the United States,” highlights some potentially troubling statistics, among them, a 3.1 percent overall increase in the relative overall comparative violent crime rate While this statistic is troubling on its face, there are several crucial points to bear in mind when interpreting the data. First, the rise in crime was relative to the year before. Violent crime has fallen steadily for decades now (and was in fact at half-century record lows) and therefore is more pronounced as an uptick simply because of the low starting point. Furthermore, the violent… View Article

Price Gouging Laws: Good Politics, Bad Economics

Forbes Magazine published a column on September 23, 2016 by Jeffrey Dorfman, a professor of economics at the University of Georgia, “Price Gouging Laws Are Good Politics but Bad Economics.” The column is published in its entirety below; access it online here. Price Gouging Laws Are Good Politics but Bad Economics By Jeffrey Dorfman A leak in a gas pipeline in Alabama this week caused a gasoline shortage in several states in the southeastern United States, including my home state of Georgia. Both luckily and unluckily for motorists in Georgia, the state has an anti-price gouging law. These laws, commonly employed by governors to stop price increases after natural disasters, make consumers happy but also stop markets from alleviating… View Article
The Wall Street Journal edition of September 23, 2016,  published an op-ed by Tracie Sharp, head of the State Policy Network (of which the Georgia Public Policy Foundation is a member) and our Darcy Olsen, head of our sister think tank, the Goldwater Institute. It warns against donor disclosure initiatives for nonprofits. The op-ed is published below; access it online at http://www.wsj.com/articles/beware-of-anti-speech-ballot-measures-1474586180. Beware of Anti-Speech Ballot Measures Forcing nonprofits to submit donor lists to government officials is unconstitutional.  By Tracie Sharp and Darcy Olsen When voters in Missouri, South Dakota, Washington and Oregon go to the polls in November, they will vote on ballot measures that are cleverly marketed as legislation aimed at reducing “big money” and “outside influence”… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd As the Georgia Council on Economic Education tells it, in 1962, a young professor from Georgia State College addressed the Rebel Chapter of the Young Presidents Organization at Callaway Gardens. He spoke “so eloquently and passionately about the importance of understanding and appreciating our private enterprise system that he was encouraged to create the first Chair of Private Enterprise in the United States.” In 1963, that Chair was established at Georgia State University. The eloquent champion of private enterprise, Dr. Michael H. Mescon, became the first to hold the honor. Its influence spread: Today, more than 200 private enterprise-related chairs exist across the nation and around the world. Mescon created the university’s Center for Business and… View Article

U.S. News & World Report Publishes on Education Funding

The September 20, 2016, edition of U.S. News & World Report published, “More Money, Same Problems,” an article by Georgia Public Policy Foundation Senior Felow Ben Scafidi and American Enterprise Institute Resident Fellow Gerard Robinson. The article is posted in full below; the link to the article is hereMore Money, Same Problems Showering public schools with funds has been a costly failure. Why not try something new? By Gerard Robinson and Benjamin Scafidi Public education is important to the economic and social well-being of our nation, which is why it is the No. 1 line item in 41 state budgets. Today, more than 50 million students attend America’s public schools. Some students are succeeding: They graduate… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is something that I am proud to be a part of today. The research conducted by education groups like yours is invaluable in helping form opinions and allowing people to reach conclusions that ultimately help them make the right decisions.

Dan Amos, CEO, AFLAC more quotes