Category: News

GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION MEDIA ADVISORY Thursday, September 20, 2012 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Georgia think tank ready with ideas for freight, funding and congestion relief Atlanta The Georgia Public Policy Foundation will unveil, “Getting Georgia Moving: Plan B for Transportation,” on Friday, September 21, at 3 p.m. during the third annual Georgia Legislative Policy Forum at the W Atlanta Midtown (188 14th Street). The Conservative Policy Leadership Institute (CPLI) and the Georgia Public Policy Foundation are joint hosts of the Georgia Legislative Policy Forum. In addition to the transportation proposals, the daylong event will feature national experts and policy leaders spotlighting health care reform, options in education and the innovation economy.… View Article

In the News

The Foundation’s Benita Dodd writes in an op-ed in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution of September 17, 2012, that raising the speed limit can be a safe move in the right direction. It’s a safe bet. It’s also planning ahead: “Smart” cars that can automatically keep a safe distance from other vehicles — and can even operate driverless — already promise to be the wave of the future. They increase lane capacity, improve traffic flow, set higher safety benchmarks and avoid human error. Google recently announced that its driverless cars had traveled 300,000 miles without incident.… View Article

In the News

The Columbia County News-Times of Sunday, September 16, published a letter to the editor from Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd in response to the publisher’s column on charter schools: Editor: The Georgia Public Policy Foundation would like to congratulate the schools of the Columbia County school system for what publisher Barry L. Paschal describes as one of the “communities with the best schools” (column, Sept. 12). It’s commendable that your system’s faculty and staff are committed to providing students with an opportunity for academic excellence. Unfortunately, in many of Georgia’s school districts, parents are dissatisfied with the quality of their local school – or it does not meet their child’s needs – yet they have no affordable alternative. A public… View Article
The Washington Post reports that charter schools in the nation’s capital are being treated poorly despite their popularity and track recored of student achievement: While the District pours billions into rebuilding a city system that has more classroom space than it needs, parents are increasingly opting for charter schools. If trends continue, charter enrollment will surpass the traditional public school population before the end of the decade. Yet even as charters soar in popularity, D.C. officials have often relegated these schools to second-class status, maintaining funding policies and practices that bypass charters and steer extra money to the traditional city school system. Highlights: Of Washington’s 76,753 students, 31,562 (or 41 percent) are enrolled in charter schools. Charter schools posted… View Article

Caps on Damages Won’t Reduce Defensive Medicine

The recent health care debate has completely ignored one of the major health care cost drivers: defensive medicine. Writing in The Hill, Dr. Jeff Segal states why the Affordable Care Act will do little to reduce healthcare spending: One reason, according to Gallup, is that one in four healthcare dollars in America is spent on defensive medicine. Defensive medicine occurs when doctors order more tests and procedures — such as CT scans, blood work and biopsies — than are medically necessary to keep from being sued. This costs consumers as much as $650 billion annually. In Texas, 79 percent of physicians said they practice defensive medicine compared to 81 percent in all states. This despite comprehensive legal reform adopted… View Article

National PTA Supports Georgia Charter Policy

The National Parent Teacher Association has revamped its policy to make it clear that it supports giving entities other than local school boards the right to approve charter schools, according to Education Week.  The article points out that this position conflicts with the Georgia PTA’s position, but “Georgia PTA  officials declined to comment on their apparent break with the National PTA on the issue. ” National PTA President Betsy Landers called their attention to the deletion, and said her organization wanted to ensure that its support “extends to all authorizing bodies and public charter schools,” as long as they are held to high standards. Ms. Landers noted that almost 50 percent of public charter schools in operation today are… View Article

Facts on Energy

The National Center for Policy Analysis reports: The Institute of Energy Research recently published Hard Factsan energy primer that seeks to correct myths that shroud current debate surrounding energy. Domestically, the United States has enough of fossil fuels to last for centuries. In 2011, the United States produced 23 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, making it the world’s top producer. In the same year, the United States produced 5.67 million barrels of oil per day, becoming a third largest oil producer. Proved worldwide reserves of conventional oil doubled from 642 billion barrels in 1980 to 1.3 trillion barrels in 2009. The United States has 261 billion tons of coal in proved reserves, making it the most in… View Article

Foundation Unveils Its New Web Site

Dear Friends of Georgia, More than 20 years ago, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established with the goal of promoting market-based public policy in our state. We began publishing a newsletter and occasional papers, holding policy events and sending out our weekly “Friday Fax.” About 15 years ago, we created our Web site to take advantage of Al Gore’s invention, the Internet, and started posting our papers and the Friday Fax. In 2003, we committed to publishing a weekly commentary and, as more people switched to e-mail, we gradually did away with the Friday Fax facsimile version (you did remember that’s what “fax” stands for?!) and renamed it the Friday Facts. We embraced social media and nowadays you can… View Article

Bank fees are on the rise

As the saying goes, there is no such thing as a free lunch. As we predicted in “How Dodd-Frank Price Controls Poach Peach State Prosperity,” the federal price controls enacted by Congress are having unintended consequences. CNN reports that “Checking accounts have been getting more expensive, as banks hike monthly costs, ATM charges and overdraft fees, according to a survey of more than 100 banks released Monday by bank comparison website MoneyRates.com. … These rising fees come as banks continue to look for ways to recoup revenue lost under the Durbin amendment, which took effect last October and limited the fees banks can charge retailers each time customers swipe their debit cards to make purchases, known as interchange View Article

Education Reform for the Digital Era

By Eric Wearne While many books, websites, and events exist to catalog new concepts in online education, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute’s Education Reform for the Digital Era offers both a discussion and some practical solutions.  First, the editors, Checker Finn and Daniela Fairchild, describe three barriers to change which currently hinder online learning: Interest groups that try to either “capture the potential of technology to advance their own interests or to shackle it in ways that keep it from harming those interests”; The governance and financing structure of the current public school system; and, Issues of organizational capacity within the current public school system. The authors of the various chapters outline ways to address all three issues. First, regarding… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has been a catalyst for common sense proposals—and elected officials are listening and reacting.

U.S. Senator Bill Frist more quotes