The weekly Friday Facts email is the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s most popular publication. Distributed every Friday morning to thousands of subscribers and on social media, this collection summarizes policy news, views, events, and Quotes of Note. Each item is sourced, with links included for further reading. Sign up today and start receiving Friday Facts this week!

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Friday Facts: December 03, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane In the early days of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, even public charter school choice was needlessly limited in Georgia, as this 1996 article demonstrates. The Foundation enthusiastically embraced a role as school choice champion. In 2021, as the Foundation celebrates its 30th anniversary, Georgians, too, can celebrate the hard-won public education options available for students: startup charter schools, state-commissioned charter schools and online charter schools. Legislators have also approved tuition tax credit scholarships and special-needs scholarships. And the Foundation continues its campaign to expand and … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: November 26, 2021

 It’s Friday! Memory Lane All the president’s men: At the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s 30th anniversary dinner in September, our photographer captured the attending presidents who have led the organization and championed “Policy Over Politics” through the decades. Below, from left are Griff Doyle, Kelly McCutchen, Kyle Wingfield and Rogers Wade.  Quotes of note “Whether looking at raw standardized test scores, statistical comparisons of states’ test scores with the Educational Freedom Index, or research on the competitive effects of school choice, the overwhelming conclusion is that educational choice has a … Continue Reading →

Friday Facts: November 19, 2021

It’s Friday! Memory Lane Welfare reform and championing the dignity of work have been longtime, linked goals at the Georgia Public Policy Foundation since its founding in 1991, as this 1992 article demonstrates. Sadly, while policies may improve, bureaucracies continue to grow. This year, as the Foundation marks 30 years of “Changing Georgia Policy, Changing Georgians’ Lives,” the war on poverty continues, and government is often on the wrong side. Quotes of note “I like people who buck the system. Individualists. I often warn people ‘Somewhere along the way, someone … Continue Reading →

Study on Mileage-Based User Fees for Georgia Debuts at State Capitol

GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION MEDIA ADVISORY Monday, November 15, 2021 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact Keara Vickers at 404-256-4050 or kearav@georgiapolicy.org Transportation Expert to Testify on Mileage-Based User Fees for Georgia Atlanta – Robert Poole, director of transportation policy at Reason Foundation and a Senior Fellow at the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, will testify on mileage-based user fees today at 2 p.m. before a Georgia Legislature Joint Study Committee, the Georgia Commission on E-Commerce & Freight Infrastructure Funding. Poole is the lead author of “Driving Change: The Promise of Per-Mile Charges for Georgia … Continue Reading →

Friday Facts: November 05, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Honorable mention: Noel Khalil, founder and CEO of Columbia Residential and Columbia Ventures, died October 25 after a long illness. He was 70. Khalil founded Atlanta-based Columbia Residential 30 years ago to provide high-quality, affordable housing where people would be proud to live. His work created nearly 10,000 homes for families from very low-income to market-rate, a spokesman said. He spoke at the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s annual dinner in 2014, discussing his family’s journey from Jamaica to the United States. This year, as we mark … Continue Reading →

Friday Facts: October 15, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Holding water: From privatization to public-private partnerships to express toll lanes, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation has never shied away from market-based proposals that have generated controversy at the time. One example is “Water Permit Transfers: Bridging The Misinformation Gap,” a study published in 2003. With the memory of a four-year drought fresh in the minds of Georgians and the state’s agricultural sector, the study proposed that  farmers be allowed to transfer their water withdrawal permits “as an opportunity to encourage balanced growth in Georgia and … Continue Reading →

Georgia Public Policy Foundation Friday Facts: October 8, 2021

It’s Friday! Memory Lane A public service that made its debut in 1996 thanks to the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was the innovative Report Card on Georgia’s public schools, highlighted here in a 1996 article in the Macon Telegraph. One of the Foundation’s most popular publications, the Report Card, which ranked schools and education spending, was eagerly awaited by real estate agents across the state as they worked with families on home purchases. The Foundation ceased publication after the state Department of Education began publicizing the data. This year, the … Continue Reading →

Friday Facts: October 1, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Wheels of change turn slowly: In 2006, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation published a transportation study: “Reducing Congestion in Atlanta: A Bold New Approach to Increasing Mobility.” “For Atlanta to implement this kind of change would mean a major rethink and rewrite of the current long-range transportation plan,” wrote the study’s author, Bob Poole. One of Poole’s proposals – a long-term concession approach for toll projects – is finally coming to fruition in the I-285 express toll lanes, which will be built and operated by a … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: September 24, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Were you there? Thirty years of Policy Over Politics: The Georgia Public Policy Foundation celebrated its 30th anniversary on September 16 at the Georgia Aquarium with nearly 250 friends and supporters. Watch what some of our dearest friends said about 30 years of Changing Georgia Policy. Quotes of note “Many ideas grow better when transplanted into another mind than the one where they sprang up. “ – Oliver Wendell Holmes “Your corn is ripe today; mine will be so tomorrow. ‘Tis profitable for us both, that … Continue Reading →

Friday Facts: September 10, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane  Never forget: A sign painted on the hillside campus of Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School along U.S. 23 in Rabun County is one of many across Georgia and around the nation to commemorate the victims and heroes of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, which left nearly 3,000 dead. Quotes of note “For me and my family personally, September 11 was a reminder that life is fleeting, impermanent and uncertain. Therefore, we must make use of every moment and nurture it with affection, tenderness, beauty, creativity and … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: August 20, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane One of the founding principles of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation is to limit the role of government in the lives of Georgians. Control of tax dollars from the state’s taxpayers not only gives government an unfair advantage when it goes into business, it can also be a disincentive for government to operate as efficiently and cost-effectively as private businesses would. These are some of the reasons the Foundation has promoted privatization and outsourcing of many government operations since its founding in 1991. In less than … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: August 13, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane What a W.A.S.T.E: Soon after it was established in 1991, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation created the W.A.S.T.E. Award, an ignominious recognition of the Tax Day deadline that highlighted the highly irresponsible expenditure of public funds exhibiting “a callous disregard for the labors of honest taxpayers.” It stood for “Wasteful Abuse of State Taxpayer Earnings,” a practice that has only grown. As this May 1994 article in the Foundation’s Georgia Policy Review newsletter shows, the City of Atlanta is no newcomer to wasteful spending of taxpayer … Continue Reading →

For the Eviction Moratorium, Lots of Blame to Go Around

By Kyle Wingfield Government has not covered itself in glory during the pandemic. Perhaps nothing illustrates this better than the eviction moratorium. Lawlessness, disregard for property rights, failure to deliver on government programs – it’s all here. The federal government has imposed several different bans on landlords evicting tenants for failure to pay rent during this pandemic. Congress and both the Trump and Biden administrations have all enacted constitutionally dubious moratoriums. There’s lots of blame to go around. Stick with me as we go through the history: The CARES Act … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: August 2, 2021

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. Almost one month past the Biden administration’s July 4 target date for having 70% of Americans inoculated with at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, the percentage was finally achieved today. The administration reported 468,000 vaccine doses had been administered in the past day, including 320,000 first-dose vaccinations, up from 257,000 in the previous week. Source: Bloomberg  Delta’s dawn: The “delta” COVID-19 strain is spreading rapidly, and is thought to contain genetic changes that allow it to spread twice … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: July 30, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Once Upon a Fax: The Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s most popular publication, the Friday Facts, has evolved over the decades from a one-page facsimile sent to the Foundation’s paying members to a free online and emailed roundup of the week’s interesting policy news and views. Here’s how it looked in January 1999. The Foundation celebrates its 30th anniversary with an event September 16 at the Georgia Aquarium. Quotes of note “Congress has spent so much money in the past year that the recipients are having a … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: July 23, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Sometimes, the wheels of change turn exceedingly slow. As early as 1992 (right) – one year after the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was founded – and as recently as last week, the Foundation has focused on reforming the restrictive certificate-of-need regulations in the state. The Foundation celebrates its 30th anniversary with an event September 16 at the Georgia Aquarium, and our commitment to enhance healthcare competition and access for all Georgians continues. Quotes of note “Let’s hope the political class has learned some lessons from the … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: July 19, 2021

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. Just when you thought it was almost over, COVID-19 rears its ugly head again. For the children? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommended today that all students older than 2 years old wear masks, regardless of their vaccination status, when schools reopen in the fall. The leading pediatrics organization called for universal masking, noting that most school-aged children are not yet eligible to get the COVID-19 vaccine, and many schools are not tracking the vaccination status of … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: July 16, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Housing affordability was one of the earliest policy challenges that drew the attention of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, as this 1992 commentary demonstrates. As the Foundation celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2021 – with an event September 16 at the Georgia Aquarium – it is also renewing its focus on housing affordability, an ongoing and growing concern for many working Georgians. Quotes of note “While businesses must constantly adjust to survive, once bureaucrats create regulations, they have no incentive to repeal them, ever. Instead, they … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: July 09, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Experienced guide: Since 1996, the nonpartisan Georgia Public Policy Foundation has published a legislative agenda – a guide to the state’s policy challenges, with solutions aimed at reducing the role of government. And, as this 1996 article reveals, there was bipartisan consideration of the ideas proposed in Agenda ’96. As the Foundation celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2021, Georgians continue to look to us to bring people together with fact-based policy ideas for the state’s challenges. As important, the Guide to the Issues lives on. Quotes … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: July 02, 2021

 It’s Friday!  Quotes of Note “When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.” – The Declaration of Independence, ratified July 4, 1776 “Allow me to say, in … Continue Reading →