Category: Facts

Climate Change Rules Could Be the Death of You

This op-ed by Heartland Institute Research Fellow H. Sterling Burnett appeared in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution at http://www.ajc.com/news/news/opinion/choose-the-vehicle-you-want/nj3TR/ Climate or Crash Risk in Your Vehicle Choice By H. Sterling Burnett, Ph.D.  Environmentalists are coming after your car — again. And what they don’t want you to know is their crusade, if successful, would result in a multitude of unnecessary deaths.  With the false promise of reduced dependence on foreign oil, environmental radicals convinced Congress to establish Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards beginning in 1975. CAFE standards required cars to meet federally mandated fuel economy targets or pay a hefty tax, a tax on gas guzzling sedans. The results? Many people switched to smaller, more fuel-efficient cars. Others, however, started driving… View Article
Student Achievement: Eleven of 12 random assignment studies (the gold standard in research) show school choice improves academic outcomes of participants; no study found a negative impact. Of 23 studies, 22 found school choice improves outcomes at public schools. Source: The Heritage Foundation Parental Satisfaction: A survey by Georgia’s largest student scholarship organization found 98.6 percent of parents “very satisfied” or “satisfied” with their decision to send their children to a private school. Source: Georgia GOAL Scholarship Program Public School Budget Benefits: The average scholarship ($3,388) is nearly $8,000 lower than total revenues per student ($11,345) in Georgia public schools and more than $1,000 lower than state revenue per student ($4,488). More scholarships equals more savings for… View Article

Frequently Asked Questions About Toll Concessions

Below is the excerpt of a message from one of our senior fellows, Bob Poole, on a timely subject – transportation. Specifically, he addresses conservative concerns about public private partnerships and toll projects. His recently published Frequently Asked Questions about Toll Concessions is worth the read. I’m Bob Poole, Director of Transportation Policy at Reason Foundation. The topic I’d like to raise with you is market-based highway policy. What I mean by that term is a set of policies for 21st-century highways that depart from the statist model that evolved in the 20th century. Whereas highways in the pre-auto 19th century were mostly toll roads, created by entrepreneurs, 20th-century highways were entirely governmental—meaning state-owned, with funding based on taxes on… View Article
This paper from the Heritage Foundation summarizes the best research on the impact of school choice programs. The conclusion? A growing body of empirical evidence demonstrates the many positive benefits of providing choice in education. Instead of policies to increase spending on the public education system, states and local school districts would better serve students by empowering parents with control over their share of education funding.… View Article

Reason Foundation dispels express toll lane myths

From Bob Poole of the Reason Foundation in his Surface Transportation Innovations Newsletter: Distortions of Fact on North Carolina Toll Concession Project The I-77 express toll lanes project in Charlotte is proceeding despite an active grass-roots campaign against it. This effort is making many of the same kinds of misleading or outright false allegations about the project that have surfaced in Georgia, Texas, and elsewhere, so it’s important that transportation professionals understand what they are up against from this type of opposition. The most respectable summary of these allegations was put out in June by a think tank called Civitas NC, drawing on the work of grass-roots activists. Written by Rachael Dobi, its headline was “I-77 HOT Lanes: a Bargain… View Article
Former Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood was in Atlanta on August 5 and addressed a joint legislative committee on transportation funding. He said Georgia needs more clout in Congress. Barry Loudermilk, congressional candidate and former member of both the Georgia House and Senate transportation committees, wrote this response to Jim Galloway of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on LaHood’s comments; it was published in The Political Insider column. (Benita Dodd wrote about the legislative committee hearing; read it here.)  By Barry Loudermilk I read with interest former congressman Ray LaHood’s comments, about the lack of a Georgian on the Congressional Transportation Committee, and AJC columnist Jim Galloway’s analysis thereof; and I felt compelled to contribute a conservative counterpoint to their conclusions.… View Article

Checking Up On Health: June 24, 2014

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd My pet peeve when I visit the doctor’s office is waiting. I arrive on time. Then I wait. I don’t touch the magazines – I mean, sick people visit the doctor’s office! I play with the iPad. I text. I attempt to diagnose patients’ ailments and personalities. Most of all, I seethe. I know that if I made the doctor wait for me, I’d lose my place in line and they wouldn’t accommodate me. And if I didn’t turn up at all, they’d charge me for the missed appointment. Making me wait, I feel, is a sign of disrespect and disregard for my time. Is my time not worth money,… View Article

Studies: Cars, Not Transit, Will Help the Poor

‘Car ownership plants the seeds for upward mobility’ By Scott Beyer (The Daily Beast) For decades, urban planners have preached mass transit as the key to economic mobility, but new studies show that improving access to cars may be the best way to help the poor. Sometimes academic studies are good at officially validating what people already know intuitively. For Americans who wait through lengthy public transportation commutes, it’s common sense that owning a car would offer advantages. Now two recent studies show that cars offer more than just convenience: they can give lower income Americans an economic leg up. A 2011 Brookings Institute study (PDF) found that in the 100 largest U.S. metro areas, only 22% of… View Article
In his Policy Analysis for the Cato Institute released June 3, 2014, Randal O’Toole questions the motives of rail advocates who are willing to support high-cost, low-capacity rail transit, noting: “Supporters of low-capacity lines are not truly interested in transportation; supporters of high-cost lines are not truly interested in urban efficiencies.” The Worst of Both: The Rise of High-Cost, Low-Capacity Rail Transit Executive Summary By Randal O’Toole Most new rail transit lines in the United States and around the world are either light rail, including lines that sometimes run in or cross city streets, or heavy rail, which are built in exclusive rights of way, usually elevated or in subways. Heavy rail costs far more to build than light rail,… View Article

When I served four terms in the state Senate, one of the few places where you could go to always and get concrete information about real solutions was the Georgia Public Policy Foundation. That hasn’t changed. [The Foundation] is really right up there at the top of the state think tanks, so you should be very proud of the work that they are doing!

Congressman Tom Price more quotes