Category: Issues

FBI Releases 2017 Uniform Crime Report

(September 24, 2018): The FBI has  released its Uniform Crime Reporting statistics for 2017, a compilation of the volume and rate of violent and property crime offenses for the nation and by state. In Georgia, violent crime declined 8.5 percent overall in 2017 compared to 2016, but the murder rate was up nearly 2 percent. Some Georgia details from the FBI database: Violent  crimes declined 8.5 percent Rape crimes declined 20.5 percent Robbery declined 18 percent Aggravated assault declined 2.3 percent Property crime declined 4 percent The murder rate increased 1.9 percent Among Georgia’s metro areas, Albany had the highest rates of violent crime, murder and aggravated assault. Columbus was worst for rape and robbery. Macon was worst… View Article
By Harold Brown A year ago this month, the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico was devastated by Hurricane Maria. Apportioning blame and credit for the island’s recovery is almost beside the point. That has been complicated not only by the physical, economic and social destruction caused by Maria but by economic and demographic problems beginning long before the hurricane hit. Puerto Rico is one of the few places in the world where population is in a steep decline (see chart). For 2017, the CIA World Factbook lists it second from the bottom out of 234 countries for population growth. According to the Census, the population increased until 2004, then declined, reaching the lowest population in three decades last year. The… View Article

Transit’s New Technologies Leaving Planners Behind

By Eric J. Tanenblatt  When it comes to transportation in Atlanta, there are two things on which everyone can agree: Our cash-strapped transit grid is bad, and our traffic is worse.  Here, where one need only cast their gaze skyward to the swoop of cranes fashioning a towering, new skyline of glimmering glass and steel to understand the sea of red that drowns our highways each night, it’s plainly clear that growing pains are at hand – and, with them, worsening road congestion.  Our sprawling city is in desperate need of expanded public transportation. And it’s critical that it be equitable and accessible, because Atlanta will only truly be connected and vibrant when its mass transit system has equal buy-in… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd In 2017, U.S. World and News Report’s ranking of the best states to live featured not a single Southern state in the top 10. Georgia, at No. 32 overall, finished at No. 31 in the education rankings; Massachusetts was No. 1 in education and No. 8 overall. When it comes to education, it’s nothing new for Georgia to end up in the bottom half of national rankings. But a new report by University of Texas researchers suggests it’s not education necessarily at fault in Georgia and other Southern states. It’s ranking systems that fail to make an “apples to apples” comparison between states. “Students arrive in class on the first day of school with different backgrounds,… View Article

2018 Georgia Legislative Policy Forum Agenda

PDF Version: Agenda 2018  2018 Georgia Legislative Policy Forum AGENDA 7:30-8:00  Breakfast Buffet 8:00 Welcome: Kyle Wingfield President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation 8:05 Introduction of Breakfast Keynote Speaker Marissa McCall Dodson, Public Policy Director, Southern Center for Human Rights 8:10-8:50 Breakfast Keynote Judge Steven C. Teske Chief Judge, Juvenile Court, Clayton Judicial Circuit ‘Criminal Justice Reform for a Secure Future’ 9:00-10:35 SESSION I A Responsible Path Forward for Health Care Change is coming slowly at the federal level even as health care costs and premiums continue to rise in the states. Georgia is not among the states that expanded the category of population covered by Medicaid, whose rising costs are unsustainable. Total Medicaid spending in FY 2016 was $574.2… View Article

The Black Hole of Camden County’s Spaceport

By Jim Renner My friend works hard at a low-paying job. Every week he buys a lottery ticket, even though he knows the odds of winning are miniscule. For him, it’s inexpensive entertainment. But if he spent half his paycheck on lottery tickets, we’d all agree he was crazy for wasting his money chasing an impossible dream. Camden County, Ga., doesn’t understand this logic. The county administrator and commissioners have spent almost $5 million taxpayer dollars pursuing a fantasy with almost zero chance of success. They dream of building a commercial spaceport for small start-up companies to launch rockets over Cumberland Island National Seashore. They make extravagant claims about creating jobs and attracting businesses, and bemoan the children forced to… View Article
By Senator John McCain John McCain (R-Ariz.), died of cancer on August 25, 2018, at age 81.  The senior senator from Arizona was the keynote speaker at the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s 15th anniversary celebration on October 9, 2006. These are excerpts from his speech. These are challenging days. Elections approaching. My party has a tough fight on its hands. Part of the reasons are the difficulties of war, and America’s waning patience with it. Partly, it is just a typical cyclical challenge for the party in power, the sixth year of a presidency. But a part of it is our own fault. And we must not only remind the voters of what we have done to deserve their support,… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd Four issues; four times as many experts. In a nutshell, that’s the 2018 Georgia Legislative Policy Forum on September 7 in Atlanta. Hosted since 2010 by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, the daylong Forum is described as the “opening act” to Georgia’s legislative session and is modeled after the Texas Public Policy Foundation’s (bigger) Policy Orientation for the Texas Legislature. This year’s theme is “Wisdom, Justice, Responsibility,” a play on the state motto: “Wisdom, Justice, Moderation.” Criminal justice reform was an integral part of the inaugural Forum in 2010, and it became the prelude to Georgia’s landmark reforms. The Foundation brought in the Texas experts who were the trailblazers; today, Georgia is a national leader among… View Article

The South Did Rise Again!

By Harold Brown In the first half of the 20th century, the South lost many of its people to northern and western migration. Much of the loss was due to “The Great Migration,” demographers’ term for the movement of black Americans north in search of better jobs and greater freedom. From the 1910s to the 1950s about 4.5 million blacks moved away from the South, along with about the same number of whites. The percentage of blacks living outside the South increased from about 10 percent in the first two decades of the century to nearly half by 1970. Georgia was right in the middle of the exodus. A University of Georgia professor was quoted in The Atlanta Constitution in… View Article

Bus Rapid Transit: Burden Reduced on Taxpayers

By Dave Emanuel Relatively few people use public transit but everyone pays for it. No public transportation system in the country is economically sustained by the fares paid by riders; all are subsidized by taxes. That public transit must be subsidized with tax dollars is recognized by virtually all transportation professionals, but the justification for creating or expanding a transit system is economic development. In essence, “If you build it, few will come but many will spend.” That point is well documented with the Charlotte, N.C., light rail system. A ride on the city’s 18.6-mile long LYNX Blue Line leaves no doubt that there is development along the system.   Construction of housing and commercial buildings is rampant along the newly… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is a driving force for market-based solutions to policy challenges. The work done by this outstanding organization is making a real impact on the future of Georgia. I personally consider the Foundation a primary source for policy ideas. All Georgians are better off because the Foundation is helping lead the critical policy debates in our state.

Senate Majority Leader Chip Rogers more quotes