Category: Issues

On May 28, 2018, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation published a study examining the potential benefits for Georgia of 1332 healthcare waivers under the Affordable Care Act. This study, Healthcare Innovations in Georgia: Two Recommendations, was conducted by Anderson Economic Group (AEG) in conjunction with Wilson Partners. The Foundation published the report in the interests of furthering public discussion. It proposes one way Georgia might use a 1332 waiver to lower the cost of healthcare, empower more Georgians to purchase private insurance, restore the primacy of the doctor-patient relationship, and ultimately blaze a trail for other states to follow. The study can be accessed here. The AEG report recommends Georgia adopt two policy innovations: A reinsurance program that would… View Article
NEWS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 28, 2019 Contact: Benita Dodd, Georgia Public Policy Foundation benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org | (404) 256-4050  Foundation Releases Study on Healthcare Waivers for Georgia Researchers Find 1332 Waivers Improve Access, Affordability Atlanta – The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has long advocated for market-oriented solutions to Georgia’s healthcare challenges. As one way of accomplishing this goal, the Foundation supports the use of a Section 1332 State Innovation Waiver under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The Georgia General Assembly has authorized Gov. Brian Kemp to use this tool to pursue more flexibility in how Georgia administers certain aspects of the ACA. The Foundation has been provided with a report by Anderson Economic Group (AEG), in conjunction with Wilson Partners,… View Article

Managed Lanes, The Untolled Story

By Ron Sifen As schools wind down and summer travel begins, commuters are thrilled to see weekday traffic improve on metro Atlanta streets and interstates. What many north metro motorists have begun to notice over the past year, however, is the overall, incremental improvement in their weekday commutes. How is that happening? According to the Georgia Department of Transportation, since the opening of the reversible express toll lanes alongside I-75 and I- 575 north of I-285, enough commuters are choosing to pay the tolls that it’s making an enormous difference to traffic flow in the general-purpose lanes. The improvement is reflected in the data. The department compared the average traffic performance from January to February 2018 – before the toll… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd National Charter Schools Week, held May 12-18, is a worthwhile celebration: More than a quarter-century ago, the nation’s first charter school opened in Minnesota; more than 20 years ago, Georgia’s first start-up charter school was authorized. So how is it that so many Georgians remain unaware or, worse, are antipathetic, when it comes to this education option for nearly 75,000 Georgia students? Some parents are even unaware even that charter schools are, in fact, public schools, a failing that has led choice advocates to employ the term “public charter schools.” And when overburdened news reporters are spoon-fed by anti-choice advocates, this often perpetuates the myths that charter schools: steal the cream of the crop from… View Article
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution published an op-ed by Kyle Wingfield, president and CEO of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, in its Sunday edition of May 5, 2019. The op-ed, “Waivers can be powerful tool to cover uninsured here,” can be accessed on the newspaper’s website at https://www.ajc.com/news/opinion/opinion-waivers-can-powerful-tool-cover-uninsured-here/ZsnKhbuy8vIghoLCAnIMEO/. It is published in full below. Waivers can be a powerful tool to cover uninsured here  By Kyle Wingfield Despite years of political fighting and infighting, Congress remains at an impasse over how to fix our healthcare markets. That’s because no single healthcare law will suit 325 million Americans. There are too many differences in health conditions and market conditions, in problems as well as resources and opportunities. As Gov. Brian… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd Georgia’s thriving economy is drawing more people into the state. A visible effect is the increase in traffic and congestion. Less visible is the soaring demand for housing, especially in metro Atlanta. As housing demand grows, so does the cost of buying and renting. With more people competing for the available homes in the metro area, homeowners can afford to price them higher and landlords can ask higher rents. Lower-income hopefuls are forced to move farther away from jobs, increasing their commutes and raising the cost of transportation. Government bureaucrats feel obliged to step in as teachers, first responders and service-industry workers struggle to find homes they can afford near their jobs. The inclination is to… View Article

Still Asking for Whom Georgia’s Roads are Tolled?

By Benita M. Dodd The toll lanes are coming! The toll lanes are coming! Despite a lengthy history of tolling in Georgia, many current residents appear intimidated or uninformed about the state’s expanding toll lanes: how they work, what they do and whether to use them. Opposition misinformation also influences perceptions as memories and tales of the days of tolls fade. Recent recollections begin with the SR 400 toll plaza. The 50-cent fee was ended in 2013 by Governor Nathan Deal, who said he was keeping the state’s promise to end the toll once the construction bond was retired. Some people remember the 35-cent causeway toll onto St. Simons Island, which ended in 2003. (Jekyll Island calls its $6 toll… View Article
A new paper by Nat Malkus of the American Enterprise Institute examines “The evolution of career and technical education: 1982–2013.Key Points As vocational education has evolved into career and technical education (CTE) over the past several decades, it has progressed away from the stigma and stereotype of “voc-ed” as an academic dead end. However, the transformation from vocational education to CTE may have hidden, rather than solved, the durable challenges of vocational education. Over 30 years, the percentage of graduates concentrating in “Traditional Vocational” occupational areas—such as manufacturing or agriculture—has fallen, while the percentage concentrating in “New Era” areas—such as computer science and health care—has grown dramatically. Across many measures, including school engagement, academic performance, and college… View Article

Fighting Fire with Fire

By Harold Brown Last fall, headlines blared the deadly conflagration in the West that scorched hundreds of thousands of acres and tens of thousands of homes. And, of course, many blamed climate change for what was seen as an increasing trend. Modern perceptions of fire trends often forget the past. A 2017 article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences claimed “The United States has experienced some of the largest wildfire years this decade, with over 36,000 km2 (8.9 million acres) burned in 2006, 2007, 2012 and 2015.” A book published by the Forest History Society in 2011, however, concludes, “The area burned by wildfire each year has decreased by 80–90 percent since the 1930s.” It continues: “However,… View Article

The best way to make a lasting impact on public policy is to change public opinion. When you change the beliefs of the people; the politicians and political parties change with them.

Senator Herman E. Talmadge more quotes