Category: Health Care

By Kyle Wingfield Almost two years have passed since Republican efforts to reform the U.S. health insurance market were pronounced dead. Perhaps they were merely on life support. In July 2017, Sen. John McCain surprised many observers by voting against the GOP’s “skinny repeal” of the Affordable Care Act. His rejection left the bill with just 49 votes, the closest Republicans have come to repealing the law they had by then spent almost eight years deriding as “Obamacare.” There was one more short-lived effort to repeal and replace the law, but since then Republicans have lost their majority in the U.S. House – and their nerve. “Shell-shocked” is how D.C. denizens still describe congressional Republicans who spent years promising to… View Article

Healthcare Works When the Price is Right

By John C. Goodman Of all the things we might do to improve our healthcare system, the one reform that is more important than any other is almost never discussed: If we want the system to work well, we must make it profitable to take care of sick people. Profitable to whom? Profitable to everyone whose services are needed. To doctors. To hospitals. And most important of all, to the “third party payers”: insurance companies, employers and government agencies – the entities that initially control all the money. The idea is not new. Almost 250 years ago, Adam Smith observed that the reason the free market works so well is that each of us has a financial self-interest in meeting… View Article
On May 28, 2018, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation published a study examining the potential benefits for Georgia of 1332 healthcare waivers under the Affordable Care Act. This study, Healthcare Innovations in Georgia: Two Recommendations, was conducted by Anderson Economic Group (AEG) in conjunction with Wilson Partners. The Foundation published the report in the interests of furthering public discussion. It proposes one way Georgia might use a 1332 waiver to lower the cost of healthcare, empower more Georgians to purchase private insurance, restore the primacy of the doctor-patient relationship, and ultimately blaze a trail for other states to follow. The study can be accessed here. The AEG report recommends Georgia adopt two policy innovations: A reinsurance program that would… View Article
NEWS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 28, 2019 Contact: Benita Dodd, Georgia Public Policy Foundation benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org | (404) 256-4050  Foundation Releases Study on Healthcare Waivers for Georgia Researchers Find 1332 Waivers Improve Access, Affordability Atlanta – The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has long advocated for market-oriented solutions to Georgia’s healthcare challenges. As one way of accomplishing this goal, the Foundation supports the use of a Section 1332 State Innovation Waiver under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The Georgia General Assembly has authorized Gov. Brian Kemp to use this tool to pursue more flexibility in how Georgia administers certain aspects of the ACA. The Foundation has been provided with a report by Anderson Economic Group (AEG), in conjunction with Wilson Partners,… View Article
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution published an op-ed by Kyle Wingfield, president and CEO of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, in its Sunday edition of May 5, 2019. The op-ed, “Waivers can be powerful tool to cover uninsured here,” can be accessed on the newspaper’s website at https://www.ajc.com/news/opinion/opinion-waivers-can-powerful-tool-cover-uninsured-here/ZsnKhbuy8vIghoLCAnIMEO/. It is published in full below. Waivers can be a powerful tool to cover uninsured here  By Kyle Wingfield Despite years of political fighting and infighting, Congress remains at an impasse over how to fix our healthcare markets. That’s because no single healthcare law will suit 325 million Americans. There are too many differences in health conditions and market conditions, in problems as well as resources and opportunities. As Gov. Brian… View Article

Heartland Institute Urges Georgia to Address CON Reform

In this Research & Commentary published February 26, 2019, Matthew Glans of the Heartland Institute examines the revived debate in Georgia over the state’s controversial certificate of need program. The commentary is published in full below and can be accessed online here. Georgia  Should Address CON Reform By Matthew Glans Georgia is one of 35 states that institute certificate of need (CON) laws. First passed in the 1960s to deter increasing health care costs, CON laws were supposed to limit duplication and promote health care consolidation. In essence, CON programs require health care providers to receive state approval to increase facilities and services. However, CON laws can also restrict existing providers from expanding services or new providers from entering… View Article
Kyle Wingfield, president of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, accepted an invitation to testify before the Georgia Senate Health and Human Services Committee on February 19, 2019, regarding health-care waivers as senators considered SB 106.  His prepared testimony is printed in full below; view his presentation to the committee here, starting at the 11:45 mark. GEORGIA SENATE HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMMITTEE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2019 KYLE WINGFIELD, PRESIDENT, GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION Chairman Watson and members of the Senate Health and Human Services Committee: Thank you for the invitation and opportunity to provide testimony about healthcare waivers. My name is Kyle Wingfield, and I’m the president and CEO of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, a nonpartisan, nonprofit, 501(c)(3)… View Article
By Kyle Wingfield Bureaucratic arcana from Washington, D.C., hit Georgia’s headlines this week. Governor Brian Kemp announced he will seek federal “waivers” to improve health care in the state. But what exactly is a “waiver”? In short, it’s a way for the state to escape stifling federal regulations and provide Georgians with meaningful access to health care that’s affordable – and tailored to the needs and opportunities found all across Georgia. To understand why this is true, and how it would work, it’s worth learning a bit about waivers. First of all, what’s being “waived” are some of the strings Washington attaches to the money it sends states to help pay for some people’s health care. In theory, having some… View Article
By Peter Suderman A new poll shows that a clear majority of Americans support Medicare for All – until they are told what it is and how it would work. The survey was conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation, which regularly asks Americans about health policy issues as part of its Health Tracking Poll series. It finds that 56 percent of the country supports a “national health plan, sometimes called Medicare for All” and an even larger percentage – 71 percent – supports the idea when told that it would “guarantee health insurance as a right for all Americans.” When told that such a plan would eliminate health insurance premiums, 67 percent say they’re in favor. One way to look… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is our state’s leading organization promoting government transparency. The Secretary of State’s office shares the Foundation’s commitment to transparency and responsible stewardship of taxpayer dollars, which is why our agency was the first in Georgia to publish its budget and spending data on a public transparency website.

Karen Handel, Georgia Secretary of State more quotes