Category: Government Reform

By Sunny Park Sunny Park was born in 1942 in Seoul, South Korea. After coming to the United States in 1967 and gaining full citizenship in 1974, he became a successful businessman and an active member of his community. As a relative newcomer to this country, he is concerned that America’s youth are not being taught, and consequently do not fully appreciate, the principles their forbearers fought for in creating the freest nation on Earth and how fortunate they are to be Americans.  As an immigrant, I have personally learned and benefitted from the tremendous value of this great country, the United States of America. I think it can be summarized as follows: • Freedom — A people willing to… View Article
Daniel Bloom and Lynda Carter Cajoleas As the stigma of out-of-wedlock pregnancies and indiscriminate sexual behaviors seems to have been eliminated from society’s value system, many children in Georgia are growing up in situations almost unimaginable thirty years ago.  Born with crack cocaine and heroin addictions, or with fetal alcohol syndrome, to drug and alcohol addicted mothers in fatherless homes, unprotected from violence and neglect, these children are a part of what the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect terms a “national emergency.”  According to the Board, in the early 1960s there were 60 thousand annual reports of abuse and neglect compared to 3 million today.  Between l980 and l991 alone, reports of child abuse and neglect tripled. … View Article

Term Limits: The Lousiana Experience

By Rense Johnson [Of the 20 states that have passed term limits for state legislators, Louisiana is the only state without a ballot initiative process to have done so. Ballot initiatives, which are unavailable to the citizens of Georgia, allow voters to effectively by-pass their legislature and enact popular laws. Since the Georgia General Assembly has failed to enact term limits or a ballot initiative process, Louisiana provides a good example of how a grassroots term limits campaign can be successful.] The State of Louisiana is not noted for its good government. Good food, perhaps, and hunting and fishing, and jazz for sure, but not good government. Its constitution has been drafted for the benefit of the politicians, not the… View Article

If Government Doesn’t Relieve Distress, Who Will?

By Leonard E. Read President Grover Cleveland, vetoing a congressional appropriation of $10,000 to buy seed grain for drought stricken Texans may have given us all the answer we need to this cliche: The friendliness and charity of our countrymen can always be relied upon to relieve their fellow citizens in misfortune…. Federal aid in such cases encourages the expectation of paternal care on the part of the government and weakens the sturdiness of our national character, while it prevents the indulgence among our people of that kindly sentiment and conduct which strengthens the bonds of a common brotherhood. Thus, the cliche maker wins his implied point without a struggle–unless one lays claim to clairvoyance or exposes the fakery of… View Article
William H. Read and Mark H. Read   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY From software development to telemedicine to broadcasting, many Georgia industries depend on the state’s telecommunications infrastructure. In addition, the telecommunications industry itself already employs some 50,000 professionals in Georgia. These high-paying jobs in growing, dynamic industries are exactly the kinds of jobs that will determine Georgia’s economic future. Telecommunications deregulation will allow Georgia to build upon this solid base, enhance its infrastructure and create jobs. Taking the lead in creating a competitive telecommunications marketplace could prove to be the state’s best economic decision since the construction of Hartsfield International Airport. The primary question being debated today is not whether the local market should be opened, but when and how? The… View Article

What Ever Happened to the Tenth Amendment?

By Kelly McCutchen “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.” — Tenth Amendment, Constitution of the United States of America The best way to check the powers of government is to keep government close to the people.  The Tenth Amendment represented an attempt by our Founding Fathers to protect the states from the federal government.  Unfortunately, this protection has been trampled by Congress, and the primary means used has been through unfunded federal mandates. Federal mandates are laws or policies passed by Congress, such as the Motor Voter Law or the Clean Air Act, that state or local governments… View Article

What Ever Happened to the Tenth Amendment?

By Kelly McCutchen “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.” — Tenth Amendment, Constitution of the United States of America The best way to check the powers of government is to keep government close to the people.  The Tenth Amendment represented an attempt by our Founding Fathers to protect the states from the federal government.  Unfortunately, this protection has been trampled by Congress, and the primary means used has been through unfunded federal mandates. Federal mandates are laws or policies passed by Congress, such as the Motor Voter Law or the Clean Air Act, that state or local governments… View Article

Fight Gridlock in Georgia with the Discharge Petition

By Kelly McCutchen For many years, members of the U.S. House of Representatives have managed to have it both ways–on record as favoring popular legislation, but going along with the House “leadership” to ensure that the legislation is never voted on.  Recently, however, this ruse has been uncovered, and a little-known parliamentary procedure, the discharge petition, is being used as a weapon against the entrenched power of committee chairs. The discharge petition gives Congressmen the ability to force a floor debate on legislation being held in committee.  If a majority of House members  signs the discharge petition, the bill is removed from its committee and goes directly to the floor for action.  The discharge petition does not necessarily require a… View Article
By Keith Stirewalt A disturbing national trend hit home recently when the University of Georgia’s Office of Student Affairs proposed the establishment of a speech code that would prohibit “intentionally harassing speech” on campus. Were such a code even arguably constitutional, or had such a clearly misguided approach not been tried elsewhere, perhaps UGA’s plunge into “political correctness” would be less mystifying. The proposed speech code was submitted during the first week of February to the Student Affairs Committee, which is comprised of faculty, students and administrators. After the constitutionality and prudence of the proposed code was challenged, the Committee deferred voting until March 1, while it gathers feedback from the University Community. Proponents of speech codes argue that they… View Article

“I am here today to thank the Georgia Public Policy Foundation for your role in building a fiscally conservative, pro-growth state. Not only did you help pave the way for a new generation of leadership, you continue to provide key policy advice and to hold us accountable to the principles we ran on. In short, you have had a transforming influence on this state. We are healthier, stronger, and better managed because of your efforts.

State Senator Eric Johnson, President pro tempore, Georgia State Senate more quotes