Category: Issues

By Morgan Worthy It’s a cultural phenomenon that many Americans have helplessly watched unfold: the dissolution of respectful political dialogue and the rise of the culture of contempt. Contempt, “an enduring attitude of complete disdain,” has become the modus operandi of American political life and sometimes spills over to other parts of our lives, writes Arthur Brooks in his latest book, “Love Your Enemies: How Decent People Can Save America from the Culture of Contempt.” A scholar, author and, until recently, president of the Washington-based think tank, the American Enterprise Institute, Brooks wrote “Love Your Enemies” because of his dissatisfaction with the false choice between ideology and relationships that many face today, and as a guide to change… View Article
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Sunday edition of August 4, 2019, published an op-ed by Kyle Wingfield, president and CEO of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation: “Gov. Kemp’s right to pursue health care waiver.”  The op-ed can be accessed on the AJC.com website here and is reprinted in full below.  Gov. Kemp’s right to pursue health care waiver By Kyle Wingfield Imagine you owned a widget factory. Making widgets has gotten more expensive, but you are unable to raise prices for the vast majority of your customers and lose money selling to them. Yet, the law requires you to sell a widget to anyone who wants one. Some lawmakers come to you with a plan. They will still make you… View Article

Atlanta Streetcar’s Gone Off the Rails

By Benita M. Dodd Since the day it went into service on December 30, 2014, the Atlanta Streetcar has been nothing but consistent. It opened over deadline and over budget and its performance has been astoundingly underwhelming, yet city officials continue to explore expansion. The project was scheduled to start service in early 2013; it opened in late December 2014. It was projected to cost $72 million, including a $47.7 million TIGER II grant from the federal government. Costs ballooned to $99 million, according to city officials. That was the city’s cost estimate. Not known is the cost to the numerous companies who expected reimbursement for having to relocate utilities along the 2.7-mile route; a Fulton County judge rejected AT&T’s… View Article
By Jared Cooper Public transportation is a highly debated topic in Georgia and, specifically, in metro Atlanta. Central to this debate is the allocation of federal funding through grants and tax revenues of transportation developments, both statewide and regionally.   This system of federal funding is used across the nation. And, nationally, public transportation infrastructure is often overlooked and taken for granted. So the question is whether there is an alternative funding solution. The answer is yes: a free-market approach. The first point to recognize is that the current system of public transportation is heavily subsidized by the federal government and there is an ever-growing demand for more efficient, safer and equitable systems. An example of this subsidy is in the… View Article
By Morgan Worthy Davis Guggenheim begins his movie with an admission of his own guilt. The liberal filmmaker best known for his collaboration with Al Gore on “An Inconvenient Truth” notes that he drives by three crumbling public schools on the way to drop his kids off at private school. The families depicted in his 2010 documentary, “Waiting for Superman,” and many like them, cannot afford a private alternative to their failing neighborhood schools. The unlikely advocate for free market-based education reform goes on to make the case for the many policies traditionally part of conservatives’ education reform initiatives: school choice, high achievement expectations, increased teacher accountability, weaker teachers’ unions and merit pay, to name a few. While these policy… View Article
By Kyle Wingfield Almost two years have passed since Republican efforts to reform the U.S. health insurance market were pronounced dead. Perhaps they were merely on life support. In July 2017, Sen. John McCain surprised many observers by voting against the GOP’s “skinny repeal” of the Affordable Care Act. His rejection left the bill with just 49 votes, the closest Republicans have come to repealing the law they had by then spent almost eight years deriding as “Obamacare.” There was one more short-lived effort to repeal and replace the law, but since then Republicans have lost their majority in the U.S. House – and their nerve. “Shell-shocked” is how D.C. denizens still describe congressional Republicans who spent years promising to… View Article

Healthcare Works When the Price is Right

By John C. Goodman Of all the things we might do to improve our healthcare system, the one reform that is more important than any other is almost never discussed: If we want the system to work well, we must make it profitable to take care of sick people. Profitable to whom? Profitable to everyone whose services are needed. To doctors. To hospitals. And most important of all, to the “third party payers”: insurance companies, employers and government agencies – the entities that initially control all the money. The idea is not new. Almost 250 years ago, Adam Smith observed that the reason the free market works so well is that each of us has a financial self-interest in meeting… View Article
By Dave Emanuel The highest-paid elected official in Georgia’s most populous county is Fulton Tax Commissioner, Arthur Ferdinand. According to a report in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Ferdinand earned approximately $390,000 in 2016, “a total that included $210,281 in $1 fees for collecting taxes in Johns Creek, Sandy Springs and Atlanta.” Ferdinand’s gig has the stamp of approval from the Fulton County Commission, which has repeatedly authorized him to personally collect a $1 fee for each city land parcel for which he collects property taxes. The arrangement is bizarre, but what is even more ludicrous is that Ferdinand uses county resources to collect those property taxes. When given authority to collect taxes for the recently incorporated city of South Fulton, his… View Article

Pause and Reflect on Our Hard-Won Freedom

By Johnny Isakson On June 6, 1944, with American and Allied paratroopers positioned behind enemy lines, Allied forces waded through waist-deep waters amid hailing enemy gunfire from above to storm the beaches of Normandy, France, in an invasion called Operation Overlord. It was a joint naval, air and land assault marking the start of Allied forces’ campaign to liberate Nazi-occupied Europe. More than 6,000 Americans gave their lives that day, but their sacrifice and heroism marked the beginning of the end of World War II. The 75th anniversary of D-Day is June 6. Now is an especially important time to reflect on the sacrifices made by the greatest generation during World War II. The defeat of fascism in Europe and… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd Every year, the Washington, D.C.-based Competitive Enterprise Institute releases “Ten Thousand Commandments,” an analysis of the numerous federal rules and regulations that govern Americans’ lives. This year, CEI’s first chapter is titled, “9,999 Commandments? Six Ways Rule Flows Have Been Reduced or Streamlined.” It examines President Trump’s executive order to reduce regulation and control regulatory costs; specifically, that two regulations be eliminated for every “significant” regulation issued. In spite of the effort to reduce red tape, “The overarching reality is that the government is far larger than ever, and Trump’s executive branch reorganization initiative undertaken alongside regulatory streamlining resulted in the elimination of no regulatory agencies,” CEI declares. Even with Trump’s directive, CEI notes,… View Article

I thank you for what you do. For 15 years you’ve been researching and writing on issues that matter. You take on tough questions, you apply innovative thinking, you push for action, and you do it all without regard to politics.

President George W. Bush more quotes