Transportation Tuesday: December 8, 2020

Transportation Tuesday is the newest in a series of  Georgia Public Policy Foundation policy briefs. Others are Medical Monday’s Checking Up On Health and Tax and Spend Tuesday.  The Transportation Tuesday post of October 27, 2020, shared an article from Cato Institute’s Regulation magazine that discussed an alternate – and, we thought, intriguing – approach to transportation public-private partnerships (P3s). You can read our post here.  It elicited a response from our friend and Senior Fellow Bob Poole, Director of Transportation Policy at Reason Foundation. The response, published in full below, first appeared … Continue Reading →

Transportation Tuesday: Gwinnett Transit Referendum Postmortem

Transportation Tuesday, December 1, 2020:  Policy, news and views driving transportation. Gwinnett Transit Referendum Postmortem By Dave Emanuel When Gwinnett County voters defeated the county’s 2019 transit referendum, proponents blamed their loss on the referendum being on the ballot of a special election, which typically has low voter turnout. When a referendum for a revised plan was placed on the ballot for the November 2020 general election, however, the results were the same: defeat. The relatively narrow margin of defeat – 1,013 votes – does not tell the whole story. … Continue Reading →

Transportation Tuesday: October 27, 2020

Transportation Tuesday is the newest in a series of  Georgia Public Policy Foundation policy briefs. Others are Medical Monday’s Checking Up On Health and Tax and Spend Tuesday. PPPs: An article in Cato Institute’s Regulation magazine serves as a cautionary tale about public-private partnerships, also called P3s, PPPs and concessions. PPPs have seen massive infrastructure spending in over the last 30 years – 203 billion euros ($240 billion) in Europe and $535 billion in developing countries. While interest has been minimal in the United States, you can expect growing interest … Continue Reading →

Transportation: 2020 Guide to the Issues

Principles: Traffic congestion, while inconvenient, is a sign of a thriving economy. Transportation policy must focus on improving mobility and relieving congestion. To the extent possible, users should pay. Use objective criteria when weighing transportation options. Download the Transportation Chapter of the 2020 Guide to the Issues here Read the full 2020 Guide to the Issues Recommendations Overview: Embrace funding alternatives. Expand the metro Atlanta express toll lanes into a seamless network. Improve arterial mobility and add managed arterials. Develop alternative freight routes. Adopt transit solutions that are flexible and … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: October 18, 2019

It’s Friday! Events November 15: The agenda is online for the 2019 Georgia Legislative Policy Forum, which features nearly two dozen policy experts and leaders on issues affecting Georgia: education, healthcare, opportunity, regulation and transportation. Registration is $100 for the daylong event on Friday, November 15, at the Renaissance Atlanta Waverly. The theme: “Wisdom, Justice, Mobility.” Read about it here; register here. Quotes of note  “Retirement affords reflection. … I have had time to explore much of Georgia that the demands of a work life wouldn’t allow. I have seen … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: October 11, 2019

It’s Friday! Events November 15: The agenda is online for the 2019 Georgia Legislative Policy Forum, which features nearly two dozen policy experts and leaders on issues affecting Georgia: education, healthcare, opportunity, regulation and transportation. Registration is $100 for the daylong event on Friday, November 15, at the Renaissance Atlanta Waverly. The theme: “Wisdom, Justice, Mobility.” Read about it here; register here. Quotes of note  “Americans chose a free enterprise system designed to provide equality of opportunity, not compel equality of results. And that is why this is only place … Continue Reading →