The weekly Friday Facts email is the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s most popular publication. Distributed every Friday morning to thousands of subscribers and on social media, this collection summarizes policy news, views, events, and Quotes of Note. Each item is sourced, with links included for further reading. Sign up today and start receiving Friday Facts this week!

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Friday Facts: July 23, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Sometimes, the wheels of change turn exceedingly slow. As early as 1992 (right) – one year after the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was founded – and as recently as last week, the Foundation has focused on reforming the restrictive certificate-of-need regulations in the state. The Foundation celebrates its 30th anniversary with an event September 16 at the Georgia Aquarium, and our commitment to enhance healthcare competition and access for all Georgians continues. Quotes of note “Let’s hope the political class has learned some lessons from the … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: July 19, 2021

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. Just when you thought it was almost over, COVID-19 rears its ugly head again. For the children? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommended today that all students older than 2 years old wear masks, regardless of their vaccination status, when schools reopen in the fall. The leading pediatrics organization called for universal masking, noting that most school-aged children are not yet eligible to get the COVID-19 vaccine, and many schools are not tracking the vaccination status of … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: July 16, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Housing affordability was one of the earliest policy challenges that drew the attention of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, as this 1992 commentary demonstrates. As the Foundation celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2021 – with an event September 16 at the Georgia Aquarium – it is also renewing its focus on housing affordability, an ongoing and growing concern for many working Georgians. Quotes of note “While businesses must constantly adjust to survive, once bureaucrats create regulations, they have no incentive to repeal them, ever. Instead, they … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: July 09, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Experienced guide: Since 1996, the nonpartisan Georgia Public Policy Foundation has published a legislative agenda – a guide to the state’s policy challenges, with solutions aimed at reducing the role of government. And, as this 1996 article reveals, there was bipartisan consideration of the ideas proposed in Agenda ’96. As the Foundation celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2021, Georgians continue to look to us to bring people together with fact-based policy ideas for the state’s challenges. As important, the Guide to the Issues lives on. Quotes … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: July 02, 2021

 It’s Friday!  Quotes of Note “When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.” – The Declaration of Independence, ratified July 4, 1776 “Allow me to say, in … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: June 28, 2021

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. Earlier this month, on June 14, Dutch company Philips announced a U.S. recall of CPAP machines. Millions of them. It’s interesting how few people know what a CPAP machine is, and how many people actually use them. Until you know someone who uses one. Then, suddenly, you notice them everywhere. Stand in an airport and you’ll watch scores of people carrying this essential little case onto their flight, most of them men. This is considered a medical … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: June 25, 2021

 It’s Friday!  Quote of Note “Obamacare’s supporters talked a lot about illnesses contributing to more than half of all bankruptcies, which implied there should have been a sharp decrease in 2014, when Obamacare’s major coverage provisions took effect. There wasn’t. “Obamacare’s supporters frequently cited America’s abysmal infant mortality rate, which implied that once Obamacare was in full swing, infant mortality should decrease sharply. It didn’t. “Obamacare’s supporters claimed that tens of thousands of people were dying every year because they didn’t have health insurance, which implied that by 2019, our … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: June 14, 2021

Medical Monday: A (mostly) weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. At a conference last week in Idaho, we had some down time and took a shuttle boat from the lakeside hotel to lunch at a nearby restaurant. The return trip included a group from a fly-fishing class, and I eavesdropped as the conversation turned to the upcoming Independence Day holiday and fireworks. One described how a relative, former military, loaded up on fireworks for his display, spending up to $5,000 for a couple of pallets of … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: June 11, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Federalism, a state of independence: The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has a history of defending the ability of Georgia to solve its own problems instead of being handed top-down, one-size-fits-all mandates from the federal government. In 2021, as the Foundation celebrates 30 years of “Changing Georgia Policy, Changing Georgians’ Lives,” this 1995 Letter to the Editor of the Quitman Free Press shows the challenge is far from over. Quotes of note “In March, Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm announced $30 million in grants for research to ‘ensure American … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: June 04, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane A legacy of bureaucracy: The obfuscation in data from the Georgia Department of Education is a longstanding problem, as shown in this 1996 letter from the Georgia Public Policy Foundation to the editor of the Winder News. As the Foundation celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2021, it’s obvious that “the more things change, the more they stay the same:” An April 2021 article published as part of the Foundation’s Investigative Journalism Initiative highlighted the data overload from the agency. Quotes of note “Business takes risk with … Continue Reading →

Two Different Last Days of School

As classes wound down for summer break, I noticed two types of “school’s out!” posts from my friends on social media. The first type was from people whose children didn’t miss extended periods of time in a classroom. They didn’t settle for remote learning. Their year-end posts looked a lot like those from the end of every school year through 2019 in the age of social media: first day/last day pictures, smiling faces. They are sprinting toward the lazy freedom of summer. The second type was from people whose children … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: May 28, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Outsource resource: As far back as 1996, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation maintained that for the city of Atlanta to prosper, “it must privatize, consolidate city and county services, and improve employee accountability.” The Foundation, which celebrates its 30th anniversary this year, continues to champion managed competition and outsourcing of services to improve efficiency of government services and give taxpayers bang for their buck. Investigative Journalism CON Game: Read the fourth article in the Foundation’s Investigative Journalism Initiative, in which Matt Bolch examines what Certificate of … Continue Reading →

CON Game

Certificate of Need Laws Hurt GA Healthcare Costs, Choice

Checking Up On Health: May 24, 2021

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. A mantra you’ll hear from policy research groups is that healthcare reform in Georgia and many other states can’t take place without Certificate of Need reform. And  just as certain as that is true is that the average Georgian has no idea what they’re talking about. What’s a Certificate of Need? To personalize it: Imagine, if you will, a subdivision in which you want to buy a fancy new grill for the patio in your backyard. You … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: May 21, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane Civil Discourse: For years, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation sponsored debates among Georgia’s political candidates, and – as this 1994 article on tax reform demonstrates – encouraged voters to seek out sound policy platforms. Founded in 1991, the Foundation celebrates its 30th anniversary this year!  Quotes of note “America has a record 8.1 million job openings. The media call it a ‘labor shortage.’ But it’s not a labor shortage; it’s an incentive shortage.” – John Stossel “Will people want more telehealth in the future? We can … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: May 10, 2021

Nonprofit vs. for-profit hospitals. Which would you prefer? Do you even know the difference? Let’s test your knowledge. A hospital system’s reports gross earnings of more than $3.3 billion. Its president earned more than $4.8 million. For-profit or non-profit? In fact, it’s Northside Hospital, a nonprofit hospital whose IRS 990 form from 2017 notes: “In furtherance of its charitable mission, Northside invested in the continued growth, expansion, and increased access to these vital program services.” Let’s look at another. This hospital reported gross earnings of $1.3 billion and paid its … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: May 3, 2021

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: A man goes to the doctor and says, “Doctor, wherever I touch, it hurts.” The doctor asks, “What do you mean?” The man says, “When I touch my shoulder, it really hurts. If I touch my knee – OUCH! When I touch my forehead, it really, really hurts.” The doctor says, “I know what’s wrong with you. You’ve broken your finger!” I share that to share this: Vitiligo is … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: April 30, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane: Certificate-of-Need regulations, which govern competition in the healthcare industry, have long been discarded by the federal government. Since its founding in 1991, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation has railed against the protectionist regulations, as this 1992 article (right) demonstrates. Georgia continues to enforce them, stifling much-needed competition across the state. Quotes of note “The First Amendment is a protection of the people against the government; it begins with the words ‘Congress shall make no law.’ That’s why the courts have consistently stated that the First Amendment … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: April 26, 2021

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. In February 2021, Scott W. Atlas of the Hoover Institution spoke at a Hillsdale College event. Here’s an excerpt of his speech, from Hillsdale’s Imprimis publication: The COVID pandemic has been a tragedy, no doubt. But it has exposed profound issues in America that threaten the principles of freedom and order that we Americans often take for granted. First, I have been shocked at the unprecedented exertion of power by the government since last March – issuing … Continue Reading →

Education Information: Useful Data or Data Overload?

By Cindy Morley Investigative Journalist for the Georgia Public Policy Foundation Many agree that parents make the best decisions about their child’s education when they have reliable data: information they can use to compare the quality of school instruction, school climate, class sizes and more. So what do parents really need to know about school performance to make the right decisions? While education experts disagree on exactly what information to make available to parents and family members, they all agree the key to making the right decisions for their children … Continue Reading →