The weekly Friday Facts email is the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s most popular publication. Distributed every Friday morning to thousands of subscribers and on social media, this collection summarizes policy news, views, events, and Quotes of Note. Each item is sourced, with links included for further reading. Sign up today and start receiving Friday Facts this week!

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Friday Facts: April 09, 2021

It’s Friday!  Memory Lane: Education options for Georgia’s children have been a primary focus of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation since its early days, as seen in this article from 25 years ago. This year, as the Foundation celebrates its 30th anniversary, the state has come far since 1996: Nearly 70,000 students are enrolled in 96 public charter schools, and the General Assembly has approved legislation that improves student funding for charters. Quotes of note “He who knows only his own side of the case, knows little of that. His … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: March 29, 2021

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. Monday: Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said at a press briefing today she has a “recurring feeling” of “impending doom” as new daily cases of the coronavirus are rising and the nation approaches 550,000 COVID deaths among 30.2 million cases. According to the Johns Hopkins University COVID-19 tracking dashboard, the United States has reported more than 549,350 deaths among more than 30.2 million cases and leads the world in cases and … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: March 22, 2021

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. Calling the shots: The COVID-19 vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech are made with messenger RNA (mRNA) technology, which teaches cells how to make protein that triggers an immune response and produce antibodies without using or injecting the live virus. A drawback of these vaccines is that booster shots may be necessary. In contrast, Johnson &Johnson, China’s CanSino Biologics and AstraZeneca are “viral vector” vaccines: made with a harmless cold virus that acts like a Trojan horse to … Continue Reading →

Tax and Spend Tuesday: March 16, 2021

Tax and Spend Tuesday, a roundup of news, views and policy proposals affecting your paycheck and pocketbook. Bye-bye tax cut? Remember President Trump’s 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act? The largest overhaul of the tax code in three decades created a single (permanent) corporate tax rate of 21% and, in most cases, lowered the rates in the seven individual-income tax brackets. The tax benefits for individuals and families are set to expire in 2025. H&R Block reports the average tax cut was approximately $1,200, based on the returns it processed for … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: March 15, 2020

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. One concern amid COVID-19 lockdowns, shutdowns, mandates, sheltering at home, isolation and telemedicine is the dangerous decline in routine vaccinations among children. As communities open up again, increasing socialization and interactions, many children – and the vulnerable adults around them – may be susceptible to childhood illnesses such as measles, mumps, rubella and chickenpox, and there is an opportunity for dangerous outbreaks and rapid spread of such ailments. In a January article in the journal Pediatrics, … Continue Reading →

Preparing for a Return to “Normal”

By Kyle Wingfield To look back at my calendar this time a year ago is to relive another era. I’d just returned from a three-day conference with peers from around the country. I had three dinner parties on tap, a full slate of lunch meetings, baseball games and scout meetings for the kids, a weekend in Athens my wife and I ultimately decided to skip. Things made their way to the cliff’s edge one by one. A phone call to go over details with the speakers for a March 18 … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: March 8, 2021

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. When I was young, a primary goal of mothers in my community back in South Africa was to ensure that we girls contracted German measles before we were of child-bearing age. If it got around that a young friend with German measles, we were encouraged to hang out with them so we could “get it out of the way.” And we had to stay away from pregnant women if there was any sign of infection. Why? … Continue Reading →

Tax and Spend Tuesday: March 2, 2021

Tax and Spend Tuesday, a roundup of news, views and policy proposals affecting your paycheck and pocketbook! The $1.9 trillion COVID-19 package that passed the U.S. House and awaits Senate action has raised hackles in states that stand to benefit less – because their economies have been open – than states that implemented tough lockdowns. Georgia was among the first to reopen its economy, in April 2020, with Gov. Brian Kemp issuing some sensible direction in his executive orders and resisting the pressure from some local governments to shutter more … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: March 1, 2021

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. States have waiting for Georgia’s innovative Medicaid 1115 waiver to take effect and lead the exodus from ObamaCare. But there’s a new pharaoh in town, and he’s changed his mind about letting Georgia’s people go: Suddenly the thoughtful flexibility Gov. Brian Kemp believed was a done deal to give more low-income Georgians Medicaid coverage is no longer good enough. Yep. The waiver approved by the Trump administration’s Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in October … Continue Reading →

Cents and Sensibility in Georgia Energy Policy

By Benita M. Dodd Millions of residents in Texas struggled to cope without electricity in homes and businesses this past week as an Arctic blast led to widespread power blackouts across the state. The finger-pointing began even before power was restored. Blame alternated among renewables, infrastructure shortfalls, lack of preparedness, and Texas’ independent streak that led it to create a power grid separate from the rest of the nation. Could such a deadly disaster take place in Georgia, another Southern state with its own, unique challenges in extreme weather? First, … Continue Reading →

Friday Facts: January 29, 2021

It’s Friday!  Today’s Friday Facts has an education focus, to mark the 11th annual celebration of National School Choice Week, which kicked off January 24. Memory Lane: Education options for Georgians have always been in the forefront at the Foundation, and this article from the Fall 1992 Georgia Policy Review is one example. As the Foundation celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2021, each Friday Facts will include a little trip down Memory Lane from our three decades of “Changing Georgia Policy, Changing Georgians’ Lives.” We’re hiring! The Foundation is adding … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: January 18, 2021

Life after COVID-19 for ‘long-haulers’ Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. By Benita M. Dodd A dear young friend and colleague tested for COVID-19 around Thanksgiving and, after quarantining and treatment, he recovered from his mild symptoms. As too many Americans are discovering post-COVID, however,  recovering from the novel coronavirus doesn’t mean their health issues are over. Under the impression his acquired immunity and return to health meant all was well,  when he started feeling unwell early this year, he thought he … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: January 11, 2021

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. Mutating virus: The first case of the U.K. coronavirus variant has been reported in Georgia, an 18-year-old man with no travel history, the Georgia Department of Public Health reported January 5. The state became the fifth to report a case of the variant, following New York, California, Florida and Colorado.   Resistant COVID-19: The lead researcher in Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine trials in South Africa told CBS that country has seen more than 13 coronavirus variants since the start of the … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: December 18, 2020

It’s Friday!  Quotes of Note “The Founders believed, and the Conservative agrees, in the dignity of the individual; that we, as human beings, have a right to live, live freely, and pursue that which motivates us not because man or some government says so, but because these are God-given natural rights.” – Mark R. Levin “It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in … Continue Reading →

Tax and Spend Tuesday: December 15, 2020

Tax and Spend Tuesday, a roundup of news, views and policy proposals affecting your paycheck and pocketbook! Change we don’t need: It’s not the first time we’ve noticed that some recent immigrants to Georgia are refugees from high-tax, high-regulation states who start off happy but inexplicably start working to turn our well-run state into the mess they left. In his recent column, Thomas Gallatin discusses the continuing exodus of businesses from California. Two of the destination states are Texas and Georgia, and Gallatin warns: “The problem for Texas and Georgia … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: December 14, 2020

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. COVID-19 vaccine arrives: Frontline healthcare workers in New York became the first to receive Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine today, just a day after Pfizer began shipping the first doses to hospitals December 13, The New York Times reported.The first vaccines arrived in Atlanta today but, according to 11Alive TV news, it was not clear whether Atlanta was a destination or distribution point for the vaccines. View Georgia’s official COVID-19 status report here. According to the draft plan … Continue Reading →

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Friday Facts: December 11, 2020

It’s Friday!  Quotes of Note “Give up money, give up fame, give up science, give the earth itself and all it contains rather than do an immoral act. And never suppose that in any possible situation, or under any circumstances, it is best for you to do a dishonorable thing, however slightly so it may appear to you.” – Thomas Jefferson (1785) “My country owes me no debt. It gave me, as it gives every boy and girl, a chance. It gave me schooling, independence of action, opportunity for service … Continue Reading →

Transportation Tuesday: December 8, 2020

Transportation Tuesday is the newest in a series of  Georgia Public Policy Foundation policy briefs. Others are Medical Monday’s Checking Up On Health and Tax and Spend Tuesday.  The Transportation Tuesday post of October 27, 2020, shared an article from Cato Institute’s Regulation magazine that discussed an alternate – and, we thought, intriguing – approach to transportation public-private partnerships (P3s). You can read our post here.  It elicited a response from our friend and Senior Fellow Bob Poole, Director of Transportation Policy at Reason Foundation. The response, published in full below, first appeared … Continue Reading →

Checking Up On Health: December 7, 2020

Medical Monday: A weekly post of healthcare- and technology-related policy news, views and commentaries. The holiday season is upon us. It’s true that “Seasonal Affective Disorder” – appropriately, SAD – may have been somewhat debunked, but the fact is that depression and sadness will be especially widespread over Christmas as COVID-19 surges anew. Nursing home residents and rehab center patients must endure the holidays without family visits, in most cases, as must many hospital patients. Stressed-out medical professionals will be overwhelmed by patients and, perhaps, short on patience, short on … Continue Reading →

AJC Publishes Senior Fellow Ben Scafidi’s Study Citing Benefits of Ga. Tax Credit Scholarships

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s November 30, 2020, edition published an op-ed by Georgia Public Policy Foundation Senior Fellow Ben Scafidi and Heidi Holmes Erickson that highlighted the benefits of Georgia’s Tax Credit Scholarship program to taxpayers and students. The op-ed can be read in its entirety below; access it on the newspaper’s website here. OPINION: Private school scholarships are win for students and taxpayers By Heidi Holmes Erickson and Benjamin Scafidi Georgia’s tax credit scholarship program provides substantial net savings to Georgia taxpayers as well as higher educational attainment among scholarship … Continue Reading →