Recent Foundation Publications

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s 2020 publications are listed below by date of publication.

Click on a link to read.

May 15: Simple Change in Law Can Save Georgia Taxpayers Over $80 Million, By Benjamin Scafidi and Heidi Holmes Erickson.

Between 2009 and 2020 – once local schools received discretion over Georgia’s Early Intervention Program – the number of students classified as EIP increased 107%, from about 57,000 students to over 118,000.

May 8: School Choice Can Help Ease Georgia’s Looming Fiscal Issues, by Marty Lueken and Benjamin Scafidi.

If the Georgia Legislature does nothing, state and local taxpayers will be on the hook for at least $142 million to educate 17,000 more children in public schools in upcoming years, in addition to all the increased needs of unemployed Georgians.

May 1: Georgia’s Reopening Approach Holds Lesson for Other States, by Kyle Wingfield and Chris Ingstad.

Gov. Brian Kemp always insisted the strictest measures on Georgians had to last only as long as necessary and no longer. The data indicate that Georgia has flattened the curve, meaning new cases are developing at a slow enough pace its healthcare providers and resources can handle them.

April 30: Issue Analysis: Fiscal Policy Considerations in COVID-19’s Wake, by Chris Denson and Greg George.

The widespread business closures state and local governments have ordered to contain the COVID-19 pandemic have resulted in financial losses for many private budgets. Public budgets will not escape this financial pain, either. 

April 30: Estimated State Grants Under the Education Stabilization Fund Included in the CARES Act, from the Congressional Research Service.

A memorandum prepared in response to Congressional interest in estimated grant allocations under the Education Stabilization Fund (ESF), which is included in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act (H.R. 748), as signed by the President.

April 24: Medicaid Expansion’s No Cure for COVID-19’s Spread, by Kyle Wingfield.

If Medicaid expansion is helping states stave off COVID-19, the evidence not shown up.

April 21: Issue Analysis: Proposed Reforms to Georgia’s Teacher Pension System Missed the Mark, by Jen Sidorova and Len Gilroy.

Given that the legislation did not sufficiently address the scale of the problem that existed even before the COVID-related crash, there is an opportunity for better reform in the future.

April 17: Build the Foundation for a Sound Ongoing COVID-19 Response, By Benita M. Dodd.

Even great ideas and good intentions require evidence they are being executed, and that they are being implemented in the spirit in which they were intended.

April 3: Hybrid Home Schools Offer Families Options Amid Coronavirus Uncertainty, by Eric Wearne.

The COVID-19 crisis is an opportunity to rethink many assumptions we have about time use in school, about what content is truly important, and about the role of families as primary educators of their children. Hybrid home schools are not perfect at any of these, but they have some experience rethinking and re-balancing what schooling can look like.

March 27: Near-term Responses to Ease COVID-19 Impact in Georgia, by Benita M. Dodd.

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation marshaled its Senior Fellows and colleagues around the nation and compiled a list of policies that could be implemented quickly to ease the burden on providers, educators, businesses and families as the pandemic continues.

March 24: Near-Term Proposals as Georgia Tackles COVID-19, by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation.

Good policy is always a good idea, but its necessity becomes even clearer in times of crisis. During the present public health emergency, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation is determined to continue equipping policymakers and the public with the information and ideas they need to evaluate policy changes that would help all Georgians through this challenge. 

March 20: COVID-19 a Teachable Moment for Georgia Healthcare Policy, by Kyle Wingfield.

Over the years – in some cases, decades – our state leaders have declined to enact some important policies that would have put us in a better position. Gov. Brian Kemp has a great deal of executive discretion now that the General Assembly has ratified his declaration of a public health emergency. His administration should consider executive actions to remedy this situation so that Georgia can begin catching up as soon as possible.

March 14: Coronavirus: Self-isolation, Community Unity, by Benita M. Dodd.

It isn’t just the social-media memes about toilet paper that are bright spots amid the finger-pointing and politicizing over the COVID-19 pandemic and the ever-changing responses. There are moments to be hopeful Georgians will rise to the occasion.

March 6: Innovation, Lessons Learned Guide Georgia’s Response to Coronavirus, by Benita M. Dodd.

Notwithstanding the hordes descending on stores to hoard toilet paper, water and hand sanitizer, the response by state officials thus far has been practical and preemptive, lessons honed in recent years.

February 28: A Tail-Chasing Regional Transportation Plan, by Benita M. Dodd.

Perhaps the reason for the lack of progress is in the ARC’s approach to solving the region’s transportation challenges. In its own words, “The most cost efficient and sustainable way to leverage maximum value from our existing infrastructure is to reduce the number and length of trips it serves.” The region’s workers and commuters might disagree.

February 21: Reform is Overdue for Federal-State Medicaid Partnership, by Brian Blase.

There is a torrent of Medicaid spending with little accountability and generally poor results. According to economic research, many Medicaid enrollees value benefits from the program at much less than the cost of coverage, suggesting that overall societal welfare can be improved through program redesign.

February 14: Put the Brakes on High-Speed Rail in Georgia, by Baruch Feigenbaum.

Riding the rails sounds romantic. But once the facts are revealed, the romantic notion is replaced by the cold, hard reality of massive government subsidies.

February 7: Pulling Back the Curtain on Georgia’s Budget Woes, by Kyle Wingfield.

Georgians are puzzled by an apparent dilemma: Why, in the middle of a booming economy and record-low unemployment, is the state government facing budget cuts?  This budget crunch is self-inflicted not by tax policy, but by spending priorities.

January 31: Georgia’s Distance is No Protection from Coronavirus Fallout, by Benita M. Dodd.

Tens of thousands of metro-area residents work at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport daily. In a metropolitan area of more than 6 million residents, transmission could occur quickly. Metro Atlanta is made somewhat safer by its well-earned reputation as the poster child for sprawl, fortunately; close contact spreads the virus.

January 24: No Reason to Call Off the Tax Cut Promised to Georgians, by Kyle Wingfield.

The danger is legislators tasked with writing a budget for the 2021 budget will misconstrue the shift in when people pay their taxes as a shift in how much tax people are paying.

January 17: Don’t Stand in the Way of Georgia Families’ Education Options, by Benita M. Dodd.

The hard-fought campaign to give Georgia families greater choice in how their children are educated is far from over. Well-funded special interests continue to muddy the waters with misinformation in an ongoing effort to discourage legislators from shrinking the taxpayer-funded government monopoly on educating the citizenry.

January 10: A Job for Government, by Benita M. Dodd.

Providing Georgia’s needy with assistance is a task government has embraced. Government also has an obligation to taxpayers and families to ensure that those able to return to independence and the dignity of work are encouraged and motivated to do so.

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