Tag: Transportation

The Georgia Senate State and Local Government Operations Committee, chaired by Sen. John Albers, held a hearing February 9 on legislation for a local countywide sales tax increase to fund transit, including 11.9-mile MARTA rail line expansion along Georgia 400. Albers invited Baruch Feigenbaum to testify. Below is Feigenbaum’s testimony.   Members of the Georgia Senate State and Local Government Operations Committee, my name is Baruch Feigenbaum. I am the Assistant Director of Transportation Policy at Reason Foundation, a non-profit think tank. I am also a Senior Fellow with the Georgia Public Policy Foundation. For almost four decades Reason’s transportation experts have been advising federal, state and local policymakers on transportation matters. My Credentials on Today’s Topic I am a… View Article

The Truth About Millennial Commuting Patterns

Proponents of MARTA rail expansion have cited Millennials’ travel patterns as justification. But in an article published February 3, 2016 by the Reason Foundation, Joseph Knight and Baruch Feigenbaum (a Senior Fellow at the Georgia Public Policy Foundation) analyze the claim that Millennials were driving less because they took more transit. Of particular interest, they note, “while the temporary decrease in driving sounds impressive, the development of technology is a bigger factor. Since 2005 telecommuting has increased a hefty 79% — much faster than transit usage has increased. To attract talent, employers are keen to offer flexible schedules that include telecommuting. Millennials are using ridesharing including Uber and Lyft and home-delivery services such as AmazonFresh, Birchbox and Trunk Club View Article
Marc Scribner of the Competitive Enterprise Institute writes on the dangers of regulation delaying automated vehicles. Self-Driving Regulation Pro-Market Policies Key to Automated Vehicle Innovation By Marc Scribner Leonardo da Vinci first sketched the design for a self-propelled cart with programmable steering in the late 15th century. Fast forward to 2010, when Google announced its fleet of self-driving cars had quietly racked up over 140,000 miles on public roads. Robotic cars found in science fiction, as well as Leonardo’s sketch books, will soon be science fact. To ensure innovation is fostered and fleet deployment is rapid, policy makers must prepare for this new reality. Google’s announcement surprised even those who had been tracking vehicle automation developments. As of this writing,… View Article

Friday Facts: January 29, 2016

It’s Friday!  Celebrating National School Choice Week at the Foundation’s event Wednesday are (from left) Foundation President Kelly McCutchen, education innovator Mike Davis, State Rep. Mike Dudgeon and State Sen. Hunter Hill. Then and Now Did you know? In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, there were 7.5 million cellphone users across the nation. One year later, the number surpassed 10 million and the first commercial text message was sent. This year, smartphone users in the United States are expected to surpass 207.2 million; by 2015, text messages were at 169.3 billion a year in the United States! It’s why we’ll be launching our new Web site soon!  Events February 17: Register now… View Article
A January 22, 2016 article by Dave Williams in The Atlanta Business Chronicle quotes Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd on the folly of rail expansion for metro Atlanta. The article is below; access the article online here. Market forces will power state’s new transportation plan By Dave Williams Toll lanes across the entire top end of the Perimeter and on Georgia 400 north to Atlanta’s far suburbs. Rebuilt interchanges at Interstate 285 and I-20 east and west of Atlanta. And new truck-only lanes on I-75 from Macon to McDonough. All are part of an ambitious $10 billion, 10-year transportation plan Gov. Nathan Deal announced Jan. 12. After some initial experiments, the plan’s unprecedented scope shows theGeorgia Department of View Article
By Robert Krol Each year, state and local governments decide on which transportation infrastructure projects to build. Often, priority goes to projects directed at reducing highway congestion or air pollution. The economic backbone of the decision process is supposed to be an objective cost-benefit analysis. However, calculating the costs and benefits of any major project is technically difficult. Cost estimates require a determination of labor and material quantities and prices. Benefit estimates require forecasting economic growth, demographic trends, and travel patterns in the region. Clouding the analysis is the fact that this decision process takes place in a political environment. Politicians love the publicity they get at the opening of a high-occupancy vehicle lane or the expansion of a mass… View Article

Friday Facts January 15, 2016

It’s Friday! Then and Now Did you know? In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, Gov. Zell Miller led the Legislature to approve a lottery for Georgia, with proceeds funding special programs, including his HOPE Scholarship for college and technical-school students, pre-K programs and educational technology. This week, the nation saw the highest PowerBall jackpot ever: $1.6 billion.  Events January 27: Georgia State Sen. Hunter Hill, State Rep. Mike Dudgeon and education innovator Mike Davis are panelists at the Foundation’s annual National School Choice Week celebration. Register now for, “Georgia Education: Reforms and Recommendations,” a Leadership Breakfast 8 a.m. Wednesday, January 27 at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. This panel discussion is open to… View Article

Friday Facts: January 8, 2016

It’s Friday! Happy New Year! The Foundation celebrates 25 years in Georgia in 2016. All year, we’ll mark this milestone anniversary with a “Then and Now” Friday Facts category! Then and Now Did you know? In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, the nation’s eighth-largest airline had shut down after failing to recover from a crippling 1989 union strike. About 10,000 Atlantans lost their jobs; more than two-thirds were employees at Eastern’s Atlanta flight hub. Events January 27: Georgia State Sen. Hunter Hill, State Rep. Mike Dudgeon and Great Teachers’ Academy executive director Mike Davis are panelists at the Foundation’s annual National School Choice Week celebration. Register now for, “Georgia Education: Reforms View Article
The New York Times quoted Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd in a January 1, 2016, article by Alan Blinder about the Atlanta Streetcar System. The full article is below; the link to the newspaper is here. Atlanta Begins Charging for a Streetcar Named Undesirable by Some By Alan Blinder ATLANTA — The streetcar was stopped in downtown traffic, and before long Keisha Schwarzel figured that was enough of a first experience with the year-old addition to Atlanta’s transit system. “I’d rather walk,” Ms. Schwarzel, 35, said on a rain-drenched Wednesday morning. And that was when the ride was free. On Friday, looking beyond the setbacks that became grist for the mass-transit skeptics who populate the suburbs, Atlanta’s 2.7-mile,… View Article

Friday Facts: December 11, 2015

It’s Friday! ICYMI: On December 5, we sent you some great news about results at the Foundation. If you missed it, you can read it here. Quotes of Note “Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson  “The ordaining of laws in favor of one part of the nation, to the prejudice and oppression of another, is certainly the most erroneous and mistaken policy. An equal dispensation of protection, rights, privileges, and advantages, is what every part is entitled to, and ought to enjoy.” – Benjamin Franklin “‘Can you assure the boys and girls of this country that NORAD and the Air Force… View Article

As an employer, and a parent and a graduate of Georgia public schools, I am pleased that the Foundation has undertaken this project. (The report card) provides an excellent tool for parents and educators to objectively evaluate our public high schools. It will further serve a useful purpose as a benchmark for the future to measure our schools’ progress.

Dan Amos, CEO, AFLAC more quotes