Tag: tolls

Georgia is moving toward dynamic tolls and a network of express toll lanes in the metro Atlanta area. The I-85 high-occupancy toll (HOT) lanes allow vehicles with three or more occupants to travel free; the I-75 express toll lanes have no high-occupancy mandates but on both, the tolls increase with as the level of congestion increases. Road pricing has its supporters and detractors. In its first fully digital edition, ACCESS Magazine carries an article by Brian D. Taylor on the opportunities in using road pricing to manage and reduce traffic congestion.  ACCESS covers research at the University of California Transportation Center and the University of California Center on Economic Competitiveness. The goal is to translate academic research into readable prose View Article

Frequently Asked Questions About Toll Concessions

Below is the excerpt of a message from one of our senior fellows, Bob Poole, on a timely subject – transportation. Specifically, he addresses conservative concerns about public private partnerships and toll projects. His recently published Frequently Asked Questions about Toll Concessions is worth the read. I’m Bob Poole, Director of Transportation Policy at Reason Foundation. The topic I’d like to raise with you is market-based highway policy. What I mean by that term is a set of policies for 21st-century highways that depart from the statist model that evolved in the 20th century. Whereas highways in the pre-auto 19th century were mostly toll roads, created by entrepreneurs, 20th-century highways were entirely governmental—meaning state-owned, with funding based on taxes on… View Article

Reason Foundation dispels express toll lane myths

From Bob Poole of the Reason Foundation in his Surface Transportation Innovations Newsletter: Distortions of Fact on North Carolina Toll Concession Project The I-77 express toll lanes project in Charlotte is proceeding despite an active grass-roots campaign against it. This effort is making many of the same kinds of misleading or outright false allegations about the project that have surfaced in Georgia, Texas, and elsewhere, so it’s important that transportation professionals understand what they are up against from this type of opposition. The most respectable summary of these allegations was put out in June by a think tank called Civitas NC, drawing on the work of grass-roots activists. Written by Rachael Dobi, its headline was “I-77 HOT Lanes: a Bargain… View Article

State needs power to fix problems

By Benita M. Dodd What’s a state to do when the federal surface transportation program heads toward its Sept. 1 expiration date with little promise of a new transportation bill and the Federal Highway Trust Fund’s expenditures outpace tax receipts about $1.25 billion a month? BENITA DODD The good news is nobody expects Congress to allow the program to lapse. Washington will slap on some Band-Aid legislation taking states into 2015 (hint: November elections) but the wounds of partisanship will continue to fester. What Georgia should not be doing is holding its breath. State transportation leaders should hold their noses instead; forge ahead with new and growing independence from the federal government. Gov. Nathan Deal is doing so already, having… View Article

Get Georgia Moving Again on Transportation

By Benita M. Dodd  BENITA DODD Georgia’s economy is picking up, and with it the daily traffic congestion as growing numbers of commuters travel to jobs. Inertia followed the failure of the 2012 transportation sales tax (TSPLOST) in nine of 12 regions, but it’s time to move forward on transportation.   Georgia still needs funding. Congress’ stalemate and growing national infrastructure demands are shrinking the federal pot. At home, even if Georgia legislators possessed the political will to increase it, the state fuel tax remains a source of diminishing funds. It’s tougher to fund infrastructure maintenance and repairs, let alone enhancements, amid erosion by greater fuel efficiency, more alternative-fuel vehicles and money going to programs that do little to ease congestion.  … View Article

Despite the Hooplah, Transit Use is Slowing

An American Enterprise Institute published an article from the Washington Examiner that disputes the much-touted increase in transit use as much ado about nothing: “APTA is promoting the idea of a transit boom because it would like to see lots of federal money continue to be spent on transit. It already is: as King et al. point out, transit receives about 20 percent of federal surface transportation funding while accounting for only 2 to 3 percent of U.S. passenger trips. And as Cox points out, two-thirds of the recent rise in transit commuting occurred in the six “transit legacy cities”–New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Boston and Washington. These six cities have the nation’s six largest concentrations of downtown… View Article

Replacing the Gas Tax: Lessons Learned from Oregon

Leonard Gilroy reports that, “Like in most states, Oregon transportation officials are grappling with a long-term decline in the purchasing power of the gas tax and the erosion of its utility as a mechanism to generate highway funding, given the rise in more fuel-efficient vehicles, as well as electric and other vehicles that minimize or eliminate gasoline use altogether. Having been the first state to adopt a gas tax to fund transportation infrastructure nearly a century ago, Oregon has in recent years taken the lead among states with regard to advancing the concept that may ultimately replace the beleaguered gas tax—mileage-based road user charges.” In “Pioneering Road User Charges in Oregon,” Gilroy, Director of Government Reform at the … View Article

Practical Strategies Can Increase Mobility in Georgia

By Baruch Feigenbaum  BARUCH FEIGENBAUMTransportation AnalystReason Foundation Even the through travelers know it: Georgia’s transportation system is inadequate. Metro Atlanta has the seventh-worst congestion in the country, the freeway network lacks capacity for expected growth from the Port of Savannah deepening, and rural areas lack transportation options.    There is an opportunity to develop a quality transportation network – without raising taxes – if policy-makers embrace a new proposal by the Reason Foundation. Unlike existing plans, which make spot improvements, The Reason plan, unveiled in August at a Georgia Public Policy Foundation Policy Briefing Luncheon, is a $35 billion proposal that develops a freeway network, arterial network, and transit network across the entire state.   For metro Atlanta freeways, the plan modifies… View Article
By Matthew Click Today, states across the country face the daunting challenge of providing reliable transportation alternatives in their metropolitan areas. Urban congestion results in wasted fuel and time for people and puts American businesses at a disadvantage when compared to their global competitors.  While urban transit options help some people commute to work, and freight railroads keep goods moving, the vast majority of Americans drive their cars to work and the vast majority of goods are distributed by trucks. Moving into the future, transit and freight railroads will continue to play an important role, but the overwhelming majority of economic activity in urban areas will depend on roadways – a simple and undeniable statistical fact. Fortunately, there is a… View Article

Foundation Unveils Transportation Plan

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation presented a framework for moving forward on transportation at the 2012 Georgia Legislative Policy Forum. You can view a video of the presentation here. The slides and notes are available here. The framework presented by the Foundation involved new investments in technology, transit and road infrastructure as well as several billion dollars of revenue over the next ten years from several sources.… View Article

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State Senator Eric Johnson, President pro tempore, Georgia State Senate more quotes