Tag: Taxes

Thoughts on the gas tax

The Tax Foundation has released a new report to help federal lawmakers figure out how to address transportation challenges. Some of the advice could also prove helpful to Georgia as we struggle with similar problems. From the Tax Foundation’s press release: If lawmakers decide to look for revenue instead of cutting trust fund spending, their source of revenue should be long-term and should connect drivers as closely to the cost of funding the roads as possible, according to the latest report from the nonpartisan Tax Foundation. One option is to increase the gas tax, adjust it to inflation, and offset that increase by reducing another tax by the same amount of revenue. Besides being revenue neutral, there are good policy… View Article

Friday Facts: February 20, 2015

It’s Friday! Events March 18: “Federalism, The Rule of Law and Regulatory Excess,” is the topic of the Foundation’s Leadership Breakfast with Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens. $30. Find out more here. Register online by Monday, March 16, here. Quotes of Note “[I]t is of the greatest consequence that the debt should . . . be remoulded into such a shape as will bring the expenditure of the nation to a level with its income. Till this shall be accomplished, the finances of the United States will never wear proper countenance. Arrears of interest, continually accruing, will be as continual a monument, either of inability, or of ill faith and will not cease to have… View Article

The Economics and Politics of Tax Reform

By Kelly McCutchen  It may surprise many people that liberals and conservatives can agree on many aspects of tax policy. The Special Council for Tax Reform and Fairness for Georgians highlighted these areas of agreement in its final report to the General Assembly in 2011: “Economists generally agree that economic growth and development is best served by a tax system that: Creates as few distortions in economic decision-making as possible Has broad tax bases and low tax rates Has few exemptions and special provisions Promotes equity through transfers, subsidies and tax credits rather than by having tax rates increase with income Taxes consumption rather than income in order to encourage saving and investment Keeps tax rates low since taxes reduce… View Article

Clearing Up Confusion over Transportation Funding

By Kelly McCutchen  KELLY McCUTCHEN The Georgia House of Representatives has presented legislation to help transportation funding. Its road to legislative success is already potholed with protests – from local government and education officials to those worried about higher taxes and more. As with the debate over the 2012 transportation sales tax referendum, the Georgia Public Foundation agrees the state requires greater funding – for needs, not “nice-to-haves.” We have provided detailed evidence of statewide needs that will cost a minimum of $1 billion a year. From a fiscally conservative viewpoint, it’s always better to prioritize existing spending rather than raise taxes. As the Foundation has pointed out several times, a good starting point is the more than 40 percent… View Article

Friday Facts: February 6, 2015

It’s Friday! Events February 18: Find out what matters in transportation funding for Georgia at, “Transportation Money Matters,” the Foundation’s February 18 Leadership Breakfast. A panel discussion by Kelly McCutchen and Baruch Feigenbaum of the Reason Foundation will tackle Georgia transportation and funding solutions. $30. Find out more here; register online here. March 18: “Federalism, The Rule of Law and Regulatory Excess,” is the topic of the Foundation’s Leadership Breakfast with Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens. $30. Register online by Monday, March 16, here. Quotes of Note “The issue today is the same as it has been throughout all history, whether man shall be allowed to govern himself or be ruled… View Article
By Kelly McCutchen Georgia, like many states, faces a host of health care challenges: access to care, too many people without health insurance, failing rural hospitals and unsustainable health care spending that is crowding out other priorities – for government and for families. The debate over how to address these challenges has Georgia seemingly stuck between two options: Expand a government program (Medicaid) with its own long list of challenges . . . or do nothing. It is a false choice; Georgia has an opportunity to put forth a better solution. It won’t be easy. You start with the high hurdle of political acceptance by conservatives in Georgia and liberals in Washington. But it’s worth the effort. What if Georgia… View Article

Who makes your charitable giving?

Who chooses your charities? Is it appropriate that government increase its budget to increase giving YOUR tax dollars to charities and other nonprofit organizations? Is it appropriate that government decide winners and losers using your tax dollars? Or is it government overreach? According to news reports: Cobb County’s Commission doled out nearly $1 million in 2014 to 23 applicants. Sandy Springs’ City Council allocated $50,000 to nine nonprofits in 2014. This week, according to Nonprofit Quarterly  and the Savannah Morning News, the City of Tybee Island discussed raising the city’s contribution from $57,902 this year to more than $100,000 next year. As James Madison once said, “Charity is no part of the legislative duty of the government.” And Grover Cleveland… View Article

Expand Health Care, Not Government

By Nina Owcharenko It’s official: Indiana has given in and adopted ObamaCare’s Medicaid expansion. Before jumping into the weeds of Indiana’s Medicaid expansion agreement with the Obama administration, it is important to realize the agreement still fails some basic principles of reform. First, it adds more people on to the Medicaid rolls, not fewer. The Indiana plan puts 350,000 more Hoosiers on to the overstretched welfare program. Reform should be grounded in reducing Medicaid dependence, not increasing it. Second, it requires more government spending, not less. The Indiana plan will increase Medicaid spending by having the federal taxpayers pick up 90 percent of the costs. Again, reforms should aim to reduce government spending, not increase or merely shift it. Third,… View Article

Checking Up On Health: January 27, 2015

Health Policy News and Views By Benita M. Dodd BENITA DODD As the U.S. Supreme Court mulls a ruling in Halbig v. Burwell – over the IRS subsidies and tax credits for ObamaCare enrollees in the federally run health care exchanges – the Georgia Public Policy Foundation has scheduled a Leadership Breakfast event on March 18, featuring Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens. The topic for the event, which includes a look at ObamaCare, is “Federalism, The Rule of Law and Regulatory Excess.” Foundation events are open to the public and you can register here by March 16. I was doing my own mulling on the Halbig v. Burwell case last week. Challengers argue that the IRS rule subsidizing… View Article

Transportation Funding Matters: February 18

EVENT INVITATION January 27, 2015 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Foundation Tackles Transportation Funding at Feb. 18 Event Atlanta – The hot-button discussion has gone on for months: How will Georgia relieve traffic congestion and improve mobility, and what does the state need to do it? Is it more roads, more transit, more taxes or more options? Find out at, “Transportation Money Matters,” the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast on Wednesday, February 18, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. The participants in this panel discussion are Georgia Public Policy Foundation President Kelly McCutchen and Baruch Feigenbaum, transportation analyst with the Reason Foundation. This Leadership Breakfast, which is open to the public, is $30 to… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has hit another homerun with its Guide to the Issues. This is must reading for anyone interested in public policy in Georgia, and it is an outstanding road map for conservative, common sense solutions to our challengers of today and tomorrow.

Former Georgia Senate Minority Leader Chuck Clay more quotes