Tag: School Choice

Greg Forster, writing for the Oklahoma Center for Policy Analysis, debunks four school choice myths.  Among the findings: No empirical study anywhere in the country has ever found that school choice had a negative effect on the academic outcomes of participants. No empirical study has found that it harmed public schools. It is a lie that public schools accept all children. Over 100,000 students are expelled from public schools each year. Many more are removed from regular classrooms and shunted off into “alternative” programs. Participating parents – of all races, income levels and even disability statuses – consistently report that they had little difficulty finding a school that served them.  Fiscal studies consistently confirm that school choice programs don’t harm… View Article

Friday Facts: May 1, 2015

It’s Friday! Events This painting by Steve Penley hangs in the Georgia Secretary of State’s office at the Georgia Capitol. May 14: The deadline is Tuesday, May 12, to register for, “License to Work,” the Foundation’s 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast on May 14 at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp will focus on jobs, licensing and the role of government. For information and registration, go here. October 15: Mark your calendar! The sixth annual Legislative Policy Forum, takes place at the Renaissance Waverly Atlanta. The theme is, “Wisdom, Justice and Opportunity,” expanding on the Georgia motto of, “Wisdom, Justice, and Moderation.” Details to follow; review the 2014 Forum here View Article

Friday Facts: April 24, 2015

It’s Friday!  Social media: The Foundation’s Facebook page has 2,388 “likes.” Please share it to help us reach 2,400 “likes” in our 24th year in Georgia! Join us on twitter.com/gppf and share the Friday Facts! Quotes of Note “I own myself the friend to a very free system of commerce, and hold it as a truth, that commercial shackles are generally unjust, oppressive and impolitic.” – James Madison “There are currently 139 schools across Georgia that have received a failing grade from the state accountability system for at least three consecutive years. Too few of these students go on to higher education, too few attain job skills and too few get a high school diploma. Too often this leads… View Article

Friday Facts: April 17, 2015

It’s Friday! Quotes of NoteGood teachers are so important to student learning that if the lowest-performing 5 to 7 percent of all teachers were replaced with just average teachers, the long-term benefits to the nation’s human capital would be enough to increase annual economic growth rates by as much as 1 percent annually, according to estimates from Stanford economist Eric Hanushek.” – Paul E. Peterson “Culturally enriching field trips matter. … [S]eeing plays is an effective way to teach academic content; increases student tolerance by providing exposure to a broader, more diverse world; and improves the ability of students to recognize what other people are thinking or feeling.” – Jay P. Greene, “Learning from Live Theater”… View Article
By Kelly McCutchen  KELLY McCUTCHENPresident, Georgia Public Policy Foundation As expected, transportation funding and the Governor’s proposal to address persistently failing public schools dominated Georgia’s legislative session. The measures passed, yet several opportunities to address critical economic issues were missed.  Here’s the good, the bad and the ugly on how the 2015 legislative session affects the average Georgian.  Transportation: You will be paying about 3 cents per gallon in gas taxes more than you did over the last four years. This tax increase, along with annual fees on alternative fuel vehicles and heavy trucks and a $5-a-day charge on hotel and motel rooms, adds up to more than $900 million a year in needed transportation funding.  Legislators also fixed many… View Article

Friday Facts: April 10, 2015

It’s Friday! Quotes of Note “The professional licensing industry is filled with much more intrigue than one may assume. Regulation is often the product of a chummy relationship between elected officials and those in business who want to cut down on their competition to maximize profits. Every year, parades of people representing a variety of vocations travel to state capitols across the nation asking for their fields to be licensed and regulated.” – Scott Reeder “[W]e have a criminal-justice system with too many opportunities for generating defendants, too few inhibitions on prosecutors, and ongoing corrosion of the rule and morality of law. Congress, the ultimate cause of all this, has work to undo.” – George Will “America is a… View Article

Friday Facts: March 20, 2015

It’s Friday! Events March 26: Foundation President Kelly McCutchen is a panelist at an Atlanta discussion on criminal justice reform in Georgia, hosted by the Charles Koch Institute. Find out more about, “From State in Crisis to Reform Leader: How Georgia’s Approach to Criminal Justice Is Impacting Well-Being,” at http://bit.ly/1b5eNTQ. Watch this space: The keynote speaker at the Foundation’s next event is Secretary of State Brian Kemp. Topic: “License to Work,” a focus on jobs, licensing and the role of government. Quotes of Note “Our major obligation is not to mistake slogans for solutions.” – Edward R. Murrow The advancement and diffusion of knowledge is the only guardian of true liberty.” – James Madison Legislative update View Article

A Reality Check on the School Choice Bogeymen

By Benjamin Scafidi BENJAMIN SCAFIDI Two bills in the Georgia Legislature would allow thousands of Georgia parents the opportunity to choose better educational options for their children. One, (HB 35) would significantly increase the cap of $58 million on contributions to Georgia’s tax credit scholarship program. This program allows taxpayers to donate a portion of their state income tax liability to Student Scholarship Organizations (SSOs) that give scholarships to children to attend private schools. With the popularity of the program (based on two recent opinion polls), it’s no surprise the $58 million cap on donations for 2015 was met on Day 1, January 1. For reference, that $58 million is about three-tenths of 1 percent of what taxpayers spend… View Article

School Choice: Saving Students, Saving Money

How are public schools affected financially when students come and go? Although almost all state and some federal funding is lost when a students withdraws from a school, local funding does not automatically change. This is unique to K-12 education. “Remarkably, it’s only public K-12 schools – not higher education, prekindergarten, private schools or any other Georgia business or organization – that get to keep the money of their former customers,” says Dr. Ben Scafidi, director of Kennesaw State University’s Education Economics Center Some argue that schools can’t necessarily lower spending when students leave. “I’ve never heard a public school leader say that their costs don’t go up when they add students, so they can’t logically have it both ways,”… View Article

Friday Facts: February 13, 2014

It’s Friday! Events February 18: Monday is the last day to register for, “Transportation Money Matters,” the Foundation’s February 18 Leadership Breakfast. A panel discussion by Kelly McCutchen and Baruch Feigenbaum of the Reason Foundation will tackle Georgia transportation and funding solutions. The event is open to the public. $30. Find out more here; register online here. March 18: “Federalism, The Rule of Law and Regulatory Excess,” is the topic of the Foundation’s Leadership Breakfast with Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens. $30. Register online by Monday, March 16, here. Quotes of Note “The thought that a federal bureaucrat knows better than parents what they can feed their own families is condescending… View Article

Thank you for the great work that the Public Policy Foundation is doing across our state setting a wonderful example. I first ran for the Senate in 1994, and the Foundation was that resource I called upon to be a great help to me as we were articulating positions and formulating public policy initiatives. We appreciate very much your leadership and all that you stand for.

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle more quotes