Tag: Regulation

Friday Facts: December 9, 2016

It’s Friday!  Events Dr. David Martin of the Georgia Council on Economic Education (left) congratulates Dr. Michael Mescon, recipient of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s Freedom Award, at the Foundation’s 25th Anniversary Celebration Dinner in November. With Dr. Mescon is his wife, Enid.   Did you attend our 25th Anniversary Celebration Dinner and Freedom Award on November 11? Click here to view photographs from the event!  December 13: Limited government is not possible without a thriving private and nonprofit sector. Learn about social enterprise, impact investing and venture philanthropy at a free seminar hosted by HINRI, Cherry Bekaert and Geneva Global at the Loews hotel in midtown Atlanta. Register hereJanuary 26, 2017: Typically the Foundation’s first event… View Article

Friday Facts: October 7, 2016

It’s Friday! Hurricane Matthew State of emergency: As Hurricane Matthew approached the East Coast, Governor Nathan Deal declared a state of emergency in 13 Georgia coastal and rural counties. Mandatory evacuations were ordered in the coastal counties of Bryan, Chatham, Liberty, McIntosh, Glynn and Camden. As you consider volunteering or contributing to relief efforts, be wary of scammers preying on your emotions and bank account. Vet requests carefully at charitynavigator.org and use reputable organizations.  Snooze you lose: A poll by the Insurance Information Institute shows that only 12 percent of Americans had a flood insurance policy in 2016, down from 14 percent in 2015. There’s a 30-day “prior requirement” before a storm to get coverage. A 2015… View Article

Friday Facts: September 16, 2016

It’s Friday: Happy Constitution Day AND Citizenship Day!  Just nine more days of Early Bird Rate for the Foundation’s 25th Anniversary Celebration Dinner and Freedom Award on November 11. The keynote speaker is John Stossel; the Freedom Award recipient is Dr. Michael H. Mescon, “The Pied Piper of Private Enterprise.” Cobb Galleria Performing Arts Centre Ballroom. $125 per person Early Bird Rate through September 25. Click here for information; reserve your seat here. (Checks accepted, too!)   Events September 21: Health Connect South 2016, an annual event that connects more than 400 health leaders, innovators and students, takes place at the Georgia Aquarium. Georgia Public Policy Foundation members receive a discounted admission price. Click hereQuotes of View Article

Friday Facts: July 29, 2016

Three think tanks, one city: Kelly McCutchen (left) of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation listens as Lawrence Reed of the Foundation for Economic Education addresses members of America’s Future Foundation in Atlanta this week. It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, the Georgia Dome was under construction. When completed in 1992 at a cost of $214 million ($361 million in 2016 dollars), it was one of the largest state-funded construction projects in state history. Twenty-five years later, it’s scheduled for demolition. The $1.6 billion Mercedes Benz football stadium under construction gets at least $200 million (and by some estimates, up to $600 million) in public subsidies.  Follow us! This View Article
The July 3, 2016 edition of The Marietta Daily Journal published an op-ed by Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd, “Price Controls, a Poor Prescription for Georgia.” The article is below in its entirety; access it online here.  Price Controls, a Poor Prescription for Georgia By Benita Dodd It’s been 15 months since the end of a war — and one country has decided to keep its war-time price controls on meat intact. The result? Social and economic chaos. Hundreds of meat shelves empty, thousands of jobs lost and dozens of businesses gone under. Sound like fiction? Unfortunately, as Georgians from the Greatest Generation may recall, this exact situation plagued the United States in the months following the end of World… View Article

Friday Facts: July 1, 2016

July 1, 2016 It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, U.S. Rep. Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), the only Republican among Georgia’s 10 Congressmen and two senators, was the Minority Whip of the House. Both chambers were majority Democrat. Today, both chambers are majority Republican; the former Georgia Congressman and U.S. House Speaker is being mentioned as a running mate for presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump; both Georgia senators and 10 of the 14 Congressmen are Republican. U.S. Rep. John Lewis is the only current Georgia member from the 102nd Congress. Guide to the Issues 2016: Find out what the Foundation proposes on issues such as transportation, health care, education, taxes… View Article
Marc Scribner of the Competitive Enterprise Institute writes on the dangers of regulation delaying automated vehicles. Self-Driving Regulation Pro-Market Policies Key to Automated Vehicle Innovation By Marc Scribner Leonardo da Vinci first sketched the design for a self-propelled cart with programmable steering in the late 15th century. Fast forward to 2010, when Google announced its fleet of self-driving cars had quietly racked up over 140,000 miles on public roads. Robotic cars found in science fiction, as well as Leonardo’s sketch books, will soon be science fact. To ensure innovation is fostered and fleet deployment is rapid, policy makers must prepare for this new reality. Google’s announcement surprised even those who had been tracking vehicle automation developments. As of this writing,… View Article
By Robert Krol Each year, state and local governments decide on which transportation infrastructure projects to build. Often, priority goes to projects directed at reducing highway congestion or air pollution. The economic backbone of the decision process is supposed to be an objective cost-benefit analysis. However, calculating the costs and benefits of any major project is technically difficult. Cost estimates require a determination of labor and material quantities and prices. Benefit estimates require forecasting economic growth, demographic trends, and travel patterns in the region. Clouding the analysis is the fact that this decision process takes place in a political environment. Politicians love the publicity they get at the opening of a high-occupancy vehicle lane or the expansion of a mass… View Article

Municipal Broadband Puts Taxpayers’ Wallets at Risk

By Kelly McCutchen For centuries, too-good-to-be-true deals have snagged investors with promises that they can ignore past failures because “this time it will be different.” Peachtree City’s leaders appear to have been told a similar story. The Peachtree City city council approved a resolution last month to build out a government-owned broadband Internet network for municipal buildings and local businesses. The project will require a 10-year, $3.2 million bond issue to pay for the cost of laying fiber optic lines along the right-of-way of the city’s many golf cart paths. For those who don’t know their Georgia geography, Peachtree City is not a small, rural hamlet in the-middle-of-nowhere Georgia with limited broadband Internet access. It is located just 30 miles… View Article
This commentary is excerpted from testimony before the U.S. House Committee on Financial Services. By Todd Zywicki An animating premise of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank) was the belief that a primary source of financial instability was an inadequate consumer financial protection regime at the federal level.  Dodd-Frank sought to address those perceived deficiencies by creating the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (CFPB) and vesting that new super-bureaucracy wielding an unprecedented combination of vast, vaguely defined substantive powers with no democratic accountability.  At the outset, allow me to stress that I personally agreed with the proposal to combine the administration of federal consumer financial protection laws under one agency’s roof. The preexisting system was too… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has been a catalyst for common sense proposals—and elected officials are listening and reacting.

U.S. Senator Bill Frist more quotes