Tag: Reason Foundation

The Georgia Senate State and Local Government Operations Committee, chaired by Sen. John Albers, held a hearing February 9 on legislation for a local countywide sales tax increase to fund transit, including 11.9-mile MARTA rail line expansion along Georgia 400. Albers invited Baruch Feigenbaum to testify. Below is Feigenbaum’s testimony.   Members of the Georgia Senate State and Local Government Operations Committee, my name is Baruch Feigenbaum. I am the Assistant Director of Transportation Policy at Reason Foundation, a non-profit think tank. I am also a Senior Fellow with the Georgia Public Policy Foundation. For almost four decades Reason’s transportation experts have been advising federal, state and local policymakers on transportation matters. My Credentials on Today’s Topic I am a… View Article
*Join Lisa Snell and Aaron Smith December 8 for a discussion on student-based funding in Georgia. Register here TODAY! By Aaron Smith and Lisa Snell For more than three decades, Georgia’s system of school finance has handcuffed district leaders by dictating how state funds are used. More freedom might finally be in sight for frustrated educators, thanks to the promising recommendations from Gov. Nathan Deal’s Education Reform Commission. The Commission has been tasked with overhauling the state’s Quality Basic Education (QBE) formula, created in 1985, which allocates over 90 percent of the state’s $8 billion in K-12 funding. If the goal of QBE’s architects was to achieve minimal transparency and flexibility, then it has been a riveting success. QBE provides… View Article

Transportation Funding Matters: February 18

EVENT INVITATION January 27, 2015 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Foundation Tackles Transportation Funding at Feb. 18 Event Atlanta – The hot-button discussion has gone on for months: How will Georgia relieve traffic congestion and improve mobility, and what does the state need to do it? Is it more roads, more transit, more taxes or more options? Find out at, “Transportation Money Matters,” the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast on Wednesday, February 18, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. The participants in this panel discussion are Georgia Public Policy Foundation President Kelly McCutchen and Baruch Feigenbaum, transportation analyst with the Reason Foundation. This Leadership Breakfast, which is open to the public, is $30 to… View Article

Reason Foundation dispels express toll lane myths

From Bob Poole of the Reason Foundation in his Surface Transportation Innovations Newsletter: Distortions of Fact on North Carolina Toll Concession Project The I-77 express toll lanes project in Charlotte is proceeding despite an active grass-roots campaign against it. This effort is making many of the same kinds of misleading or outright false allegations about the project that have surfaced in Georgia, Texas, and elsewhere, so it’s important that transportation professionals understand what they are up against from this type of opposition. The most respectable summary of these allegations was put out in June by a think tank called Civitas NC, drawing on the work of grass-roots activists. Written by Rachael Dobi, its headline was “I-77 HOT Lanes: a Bargain… View Article
The federal government spent more on broken state-run exchanges than it did on its own troubled system. Of the 14 states, plus the District of Columbia, that established their own health insurance coverage under Obamacare, seven remain dysfunctional, disabled, or severely underperforming. Development of those exchanges was funded heavily by the federal government through a series of grants that totaled more than $1.2 billion—almost double the $677 million cost of development for the federal exchange. The Reason Foundation published a rundown of the troubled state exchanges and the federal grants they qualified for. Oregon No exchange failed more fully or more spectacularly than Cover Oregon. The site was touted as an ambitious, expansive vision for what a state-run exchange… View Article

Making a Brave Move on the Transportation Front

By Baruch Feigenbaum  BARUCH FEIGENBAUMTransportation AnalystReason Foundation The announcement that the Atlanta Braves are abandoning Turner Field in downtown Atlanta for a location in the suburbs was a shock to almost everybody. There are many questions that must be answered, most important among them being how much of the $302 million in “public” funding will come from Cobb County taxpayers.   Assuming the Braves do move to Cobb, the county and the Braves will have to tackle the traffic nightmare that is I-285 and I-75. The Braves were unhappy with Turner Field, in part, because of insufficient nearby parking and poor freeway access. Congested traffic was the No. 1 reason fans did not attend games. And while leaving the heart of… View Article

New Network of Metro Atlanta Streets Could Connect Us

Reprinted from the September 17 Atlanta Journal-Constitution By Baruch Feigenbaum BARUCH FEIGENBAUMTransportation AnalystReason Foundation Atlanta’s mobility and congestion problems are well known.  It has the seventh-worth congestion in the country.  The area’s residents waste 51 hours a year sitting in traffic, and those delays cost the region $3.1 billion a year. Metro Atlanta agencies plan to spend $84 billion over the next 30 years on transportation.  Unfortunately, the transportation plans treat far too many prospects as stand-alone ventures intended to address single-problem spots. Atlanta needs a connected transportation network to fix today’s congestion and handle the demands of looming population growth.  Right now, Atlanta, with 7,500 lane miles, has one of the most underdeveloped surface street networks of any major… View Article
By Mike Klein MIKE KLEINEditor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation It is somewhat understandable that the Atlanta highway system was built like a wheel with the city at the center and interstates fanning out from the core.  Think about our regional rail lines as they existed before and after the Civil War:  a few rail lines primarily destined for Terminus as it was known before the city’s name became Atlanta.  The folly was to design 20th Century highways on a 19th Century rail model.  Flush everything and everyone directly into the core and you get gridlock.  Know it, feel it, own it. Well-meaning politicians and planners have spent decades chasing whatever the current view was of the best balance between interstates,… View Article
GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION EVENT August 1, 2013 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Register Now for ‘Georgia Transportation: The Next Frontier’ Atlanta – Have you registered yet? Join the Georgia Public Policy Foundation on Wednesday, August 28, 2013 at the Georgian Club for a noon Policy Briefing Luncheon keynoted by Foundation Senior Fellow Baruch Feigenbaum, “Georgia Transportation: The Next Frontier.” Feigenbaum, a metro Atlanta resident and Transportation Policy Analyst at the Reason Foundation, will unveil his new study, “Reducing Traffic Congestion and Increasing Mobility in Atlanta: 2013.” He is author of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation 2012 Issue Analysis, “Getting Georgia Going: An Analysis of the Referendum on Georgia’s Transportation Special Local Options Sales… View Article
GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION EVENT July 17, 2013 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org August 28 Event Focuses on ‘Georgia Transportation: The Next Frontier’ Atlanta – You are invited to join the Georgia Public Policy Foundation on Wednesday, August 28, 2013 at the Georgian Club for a noon Policy Briefing Luncheon keynoted by Foundation Senior Fellow Baruch Feigenbaum, “Georgia Transportation: The Next Frontier.” Feigenbaum, a metro Atlanta resident and Transportation Policy Analyst at the Reason Foundation, will unveil his new study, “Reducing Traffic Congestion and Increasing Mobility in Atlanta: 2013.” Baruch FeigenbaumSenior FellowGeorgia Public Policy Foundation This event is open to the public and will cost $30 to attend. Register online by Monday, August 26, at http://tinyurl.com/ln9lmhv View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is a driving force for market-based solutions to policy challenges. The work done by this outstanding organization is making a real impact on the future of Georgia. I personally consider the Foundation a primary source for policy ideas. All Georgians are better off because the Foundation is helping lead the critical policy debates in our state.

Senate Majority Leader Chip Rogers more quotes