Tag: professional licensing

Friday Facts: July 17, 2015

Events Join us in Savannah on July 29! Just 10 days to the registration deadline (July 27) for the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s annual Friedman Legacy for Freedom Day event, noon at Vic’s on the River in Savannah. This Policy Briefing Luncheon is keynoted by Dr. Ben Scafidi, Georgia’s foremost expert on education funding, and is sponsored by the Friedman Foundation and the Georgia Charter Schools Association. $30. Find out more and register here. October 15: Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute, (who The Wall Street Journal calls “the leader of Washington’s hottest think tank”) is the keynote speaker at the sixth annual Georgia Legislative Policy Forum. 7:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Thursday, October 15, at the… View Article

Principles for Professional Licensing Reform

Gov. Rick Snyder recently announced plans to reform professional licensing in Michigan, writes Mackinac Center for Public Policy policy analyst Jarrett Skorup. Gov. Snyder has proposed a set of principles to guide reform: There must be a substantial harm or danger to the public health, safety, or welfare as a result of unregulated practice, which will be abated through licensure. The practice of the occupation must require highly specialized education or training. The cost to state government of regulating the occupation must be revenue neutral. There must be no alternatives to state regulation of the occupation (such as national or third-party accreditation) which adequately protect the public. The scope of practice must be clearly distinguishable from other licensed, certified,… View Article

Free the Nurses

In March, Nebraska became the 20th state to allow nurses with the most advanced degrees to practice without a doctor’s oversight in a variety of medical fields. Writing in Forbes, John Goodman argues that more states should move in this direction. “These regulations have the greatest impact on the poor, especially the rural poor. The farther a nurse is located from a doctor’s office, the less likely the physician will be willing to make the drive to supervise the nurse. This means that people living in poverty-stricken Texas counties must drive long distances, miss work and take their kids out of school in order to get simple prescriptions and uncomplicated diagnoses. This problem might be alleviated if nurse practitioners were… View Article
A new study from North Carolina’s John Locke Foundation suggests a market-oriented alternative to state professional licensing. Read the press release below: North Carolina could promote job creation, lower consumer prices, and boost opportunities for low-income families by replacing most of the state’s occupational licensing with voluntary certification. A new John Locke Foundation Spotlight report explains why. “North Carolina’s aggressive occupational licensing faces considerable concerns about its fairness, efficiency, scope, and more,” said report author Jon Sanders, JLF Director of Regulatory Studies. “A ready answer to these concerns would be to transition most jobs currently under state regulation away from licensure and into private certification.” Sanders releases his report as the state’s occupational licensing system faces questions on multiple fronts.… View Article
The Wall Street Journal published an essay by Charles Murray last week, “Regulation Run Amok — And How to Fight Back,” arguing that “America is no longer the land of the free” due to the modern regulatory state. He cites Thomas Jefferson’s definition of good government as one “which shall restrain men from injuring on another” and “shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement.” This presumption of freedom, says Murray, no longer holds. He says that at last count there are nearly 5,000 federal crimes you can commit. He states that “No individual can know how to “obey” laws such as Sarbanes-Oxley (810 pages), the Affordable Care Act (1,024 pages) or… View Article

Secretary of State Brian Kemp Keynotes May 14 Event

  EVENT INVITATION April 15, 2015 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Secretary of State Brian Kemp Keynotes May 14 Leadership Breakfast Atlanta – The Office of Georgia’s Secretary of State is responsible for voter registration and election activities, professional licensing, corporate filings and oversight of the state securities’ market – a variety of wide-ranging duties with far-reaching impacts. Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp Secretary of State Brian Kemp, the statewide-elected official who heads the office, will keynote the Foundation’s May 14 Leadership Breakfast, “License to Work,” 8 a.m. at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. Kemp will discuss his efforts to streamline procedures and make it easier to start businesses and the challenges surrounding professional licensing. He’ll… View Article
Georgia’s successful criminal justice reforms were highlighted recently at an event in Atlanta hosted by the Charles Koch Institute. Enea Gjoza and Ewan Watt of the Charles Koch Institute highlighted Georgia’s efforts in an article published by InsiderAdvantage, “Georgia Sketching Out a Path to Criminal Justice Reform.” Some highlights: In just five years Georgia has seen its adult prison population fall from approximately 60,000 inmates to 53,000. This has largely been the result of community-based initiatives that assess and divert non-violent offenders into the programs best placed to aid rehabilitation and reduce recidivism. In the past, jails and prisons were often used as depositories for individuals who posed no physical threat to others, resulting in severe overcrowding. For… View Article

Savannah Tour Guides Sue to End Licensing Requirement

“We shouldn’t need a license to tell a story” The Institute for Justice and a coalition of current and would-be Savannah tour guides have filed a federal lawsuit over the city’s  licensing requirement. Below is the Institute’s news release: Savannah, Ga. – Tour guides are storytellers, and in America, you shouldn’t need a license to tell a story. But the city of Savannah disagrees, imposing a host of regulatory burdens on people who want to talk to paying tour groups. That’s why, today, a coalition of current and would-be Savannah tour guides has joined forces with the Institute for Justice to file a federal lawsuit seeking to vindicate an important First Amendment principle: The government cannot require a license to… View Article
By Kelly McCutchen   Kelly McCutchen, President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation New Census Bureau data ranks Georgia’s poverty rate as third highest in the nation. Combined with the state’s next-to-last ranking in personal income growth over the last decade, this is cause for concern. Georgians can either be distracted by divisive class warfare or focus on breaking down the barriers to economic opportunity.  Transportation is a good place to start. Transit should focus first on giving the poor and disabled access to jobs and education. That requires an affordable transit network that matches the “everywhere to everywhere” commuting patterns of metro areas that developed in the age of the automobile. Education is the best pathway to opportunity. Nothing should stand… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has been doing important work for the free enterprise movement for the past 20 years.  I can assure you from the vantage of a non-profit think tank in Washington, D.C. with much the same principles as GPPF that the work we do simply would not be possible if it were not for the important work that GPPF does.  We see it, we understand it, it is an inspiration to us, it is the kind of thing that will translate into the important work that we can do in Washington, D.C.  We thank you very much for that.

Arthur Brooks, President, American Enterprise Institute (2011) more quotes