Tag: privatization

The Marietta Daily Journal’s editorial in the Sunday edition of September 25, 2016 quoted Georgia Public Policy Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd on the cost of consultants in Cobb County. (Dodd is a resident of Cobb County and the Foundation’s offices, too, are in Cobb.) The editorial is reprinted below in its entirety and can be accessed online at http://www.mdjonline.com/opinion/a-parks-consultant-can-t-we-ever-make-up-our/article_916afd20-81ef-11e6-b880-b3e0f19b51d0.html A parks consultant? Can’t we ever make up our own minds? Like a farmer hollering “Sooie!” as he empties the slop bucket into the trough, Cobb County showers consultants with expensive contracts every month. Take last week, when commissioners agreed to pay $224,000 to Lose & Associates Inc. to develop a “comprehensive master plan” for Cobb’s Parks, Recreation and Cultural… View Article
The Savannah Morning News edition of June 12, 2016 published a commentary by Georgia Public Policy Foundation President Kelly McCutchen criticizing Savannah’s plans to consider city-owned broadband. The link is here; the commentary is published below in in its entirety. Kelly McCutchen: City-owned broadband a bad idea Last month, the city of Savannah issued a request for proposal (RFP) seeking a company to evaluate the state of broadband services available in the city and to develop a strategic plan that will address any current gaps in service. The RFP says the plan to address gaps should include ideas for public-private partnerships or outline “various business models for municipal broadband delivery.” That phrase makes it clear that officials in Savannah… View Article

The Dangers of Municipal Broadband

The Franklin Center for Government and Public Integrity published this roundup on February 17, 2016, of municipal broadband project initiatives around the nation. Find the article online at  http://franklincenterhq.org/12493/watchdog-government-broadband. The Internet of tax dollars: Watchdog covers the dangers of municipal broadband By As the economy continues its full-throttle transition into the digital age, government-run Internet projects have become all the rage among lawmakers in statehouses, counties, and cities. Bolstered [1] by a Federal Communications Commission ruling last year that struck down laws preventing local governments from building out and competing with other broadband networks, these “municipal broadband” projects lead governments to sink tens – if not hundreds – of millions of dollars into Internet infrastructure. Much of these… View Article

Friday Facts: September 11, 2015

It’s Friday! Events October 15: The Sixth Annual Georgia Legislative Policy Forum takes place at the Renaissance Atlanta Waverly on Thursday, Oct. 15. Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute, is the keynote speaker at this daylong event. The theme is, “Wisdom, Justice and Opportunity.” Details here. Registration is $125 per person. Register here. Sponsorships are available; contact Benita Dodd. December 8: Mark your calendar! The Foundation hosts, “The Case for K-12 Student-Based Budgeting in Georgia,” a panel discussion, at The Cobb Galleria. Details to follow. A memorial at the Pentagon commemorates the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack. Quotes of Note “This is a day when all Americans from every walk of… View Article
<img height=”1″ width=”1″ alt=”” style=”display:none” src=”https://www.facebook.com/tr?ev=6030221446672&amp;cd[value]=0.00&amp;cd[currency]=USD&amp;noscript=1″ />By Michael LaFaive and Kelly McCutchen Did you know that just three public school districts in the state of Georgia contract out transportation services? More than a third of all conventional pubic school districts in Georgia contract out one of the three major non-instructional services, according to survey data collected this summer by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, a Michigan-based research institute. The Mackinac Center survey of Georgia and four other states found that 38 percent of Georgia districts contract out for at least one of the “big three” non-instructional services: food, transportation and custodial services. Done right, contracting out can save money and relieve management headaches, too. But Mackinac found a… View Article

Friday Facts: July 10, 2015

It’s Friday! Events Join us in Savannah on July 29! The deadline is July 27 to register for the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s annual Friedman Legacy for Freedom Day event, noon at Vic’s on the River in Savannah. This Policy Briefing Luncheon is keynoted by Dr. Ben Scafidi, Georgia’s foremost expert on education funding, and is sponsored by the Friedman Foundation and the Georgia Charter Schools Association. $30. Find out more and register here. October 15: Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute, who recently joined President Obama for a discussion on poverty, is the keynote speaker at the sixth annual Georgia Legislative Policy Forum. 7:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Thursday, October 15, at the Renaissance Waverly Atlanta. The… View Article

Eva Galambos: Farewell to an Iron Lady of Georgia

Friends: The funeral for Eva Galambos, the first mayor of Sandy Springs, Ga., was Tuesday, April 21, 2015. Eva was a memorable lady; read her official obituary here. I remember the first time I met her. She came by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation to discuss her favorite topic: creating the City of Sandy Springs. Sandy Springs Mayor Eva Galambos joined Leonard Gilroy of the Reason Foundation at the first Georgia Legislative Policy Forum in 2010 for a panel discussion on the privatization and outsourcing of government services. We pushed back, questioning the need to create another layer of government. She maintained that consolidated government typically consolidates at the highest service level. She explained: Imagine, for example, two local… View Article

When Government Goes Off Course

By Benita M. Dodd Benita DoddVice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Stephen Goldsmith was a champion of privatization and outsourcing of government operations during his tenure as mayor of Indianapolis. He recalled in his 1997 book, “The Twenty-First Century City,” how he used what he called the “yellow pages” test: “Look at the city’s yellow pages. If the phone book lists three companies that provide a certain service, the city probably should not be in that business, at least not exclusively.” “The best candidates for marketization are those for which a bustling competitive market already exists. Using the yellow pages tests, we could take advantage of markets that had been operating for years.” “We consistently showed that free-market competition could… View Article

Some Cool Ideas to Combat Hot Air

By Benita M. Dodd The National Center for Policy Analysis has just reissued a “cool” 2009 paper in which Iain Murray and H. Sterling Burnett outlined 10 policies to reduce carbon emissions. I have an issue with the first sentence of their paper: “Global warming is a reality. But whether it is a serious problem — and whether emis­sions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases from human fossil fuel use are the principal cause — are uncertain. The current debate over the U.S. response to climate change centers on greenhouse gas emissions reduction policies, which are likely to impose substantially higher costs to society than global warming might.” My issue is that I don’t believe that opening… View Article

A New Model for Local Governance

By Benita M. Dodd Benita M. Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation What if you created a city that improved services for residents yet avoided the bloat of government bureaucracy and the long-term liability of government pensions? That’s just what happened in 2005 to Sandy Springs, when it became Georgia’s first new city in 50 years. Before it became a city in December 2005, residents of unincorporated Sandy Springs spent three decades complaining about “substandard” county government services despite the high taxes they paid to an inefficient Fulton County government. Their campaign for cityhood followed unsuccessful attempts to annex Sandy Springs into the City of Atlanta. But Sandy Springs’ own efforts to incorporate were repeatedly resisted by the Democrat-controlled… View Article

Thank you for the great work that the Public Policy Foundation is doing across our state setting a wonderful example. I first ran for the Senate in 1994, and the Foundation was that resource I called upon to be a great help to me as we were articulating positions and formulating public policy initiatives. We appreciate very much your leadership and all that you stand for.

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle more quotes