Tag: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Checking Up On Health

By Benita Dodd Benita Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Health Policy Briefs: July 17, 2012 – What’s in a name? Another regulatory slugfest: The Generic Pharmaceutical Association is urging the Federal Drug Administration to apply the same nomenclature standards to biosimilar drugs as is used for generic drugs. In an earlier letter, BIO and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America said a biosimilar should not share the name of a biologic product because they are not identical. According to the Kidney Cancer Association, “Biosimilars are sometimes mistakenly called ‘generic’ versions of the original biologic drugs. However, unlike generics, which are virtually identical copies of traditional drugs, biosimilars are not the same as the original biologic medicine.” … View Article
By Ron Bachman Ron Bachman, Senior Fellow, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Only political junkies really care about the difference between taxes and penalties in the recently validated Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act also known as ObamaCare. All the average American cares about is, “What is it going to cost me?” Republicans can complain that President Obama lied that the health reform costs were not taxes and Democrats can continue the canard that the now constitutionally defined taxes are still penalties. The reality is that are no new costs; they have been there all along. Most Americans just never knew that politicians were playing a game of “Fooled Ya.” As Nancy Pelosi famously said, “We have to pass the bill… View Article
By John Goodman John Goodman, President, National Center for Policy Analysis Opponents of the Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare) have a nifty catch phrase: repeal and replace. Unfortunately, they are much clearer on “repealing” than they are on “replacing.” Until now. The Congressional Health Care Caucus has posted on their website a Health Contract with America, fashioned by yours truly.  I conducted a Capitol Hill briefing on the subject and you can find more details at the National Center for Policy Analysis (NCPA) website. Let’s hope every candidate for office this fall endorses the Contract. Here are the main ideas: Tax Fairness. The federal government should give everyone the same tax relief for the purchase of private health insurance,… View Article
By Ron Bachman Ron Bachman, Senior Fellow, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, it is the undisputed law of the land. The alliance of the conservative Chief Justice John Roberts and the four liberal justices was a surprise to many, as was the logic used. The decision required a curious “jiu jitsu” interpretation of taxes and penalties. Writing for the majority, Roberts declared the law’s penalties are not taxes when dismissing the application of the Anti-Injunction Act, and then defined the penalties as taxes when declaring the individual mandate constitutional, even though the law specifically and purposefully avoided the tax label for the penalties. Roberts ruled… View Article
The U.S. Supreme Court has voted 5-4 to uphold the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act federal health care reform law.  This means the individual mandate survives.  There are questions about how this decision will affect state Medicaid programs, including Georgia Medicaid.  Today we will monitor and present the extensive reactions to this historic decision.  We invite you to check back here as Georgia leaders react.   Comments compiled by Mike Klein. Robert Schapiro, Dean, Emory University Law School 3:35 pm — Statement from Robert Schapiro, Dean, Emory University School of Law: “Chief Justice (John Roberts) has crafted an opinion that manages to uphold the law without making any dramatic comments on the state of existing law.  The chief justice accepted… View Article
The U.S. Supreme Court has voted 5-4 to uphold the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act federal health care reform law. This means the individual mandate survives. There are questions about how this decision will affect state Medicaid programs, including Georgia Medicaid. Today we will monitor the extensive reactions to this historic decision. This is the second of two files on the Foundation blog. Please see the earlier file for those reactions earlier today. Compiled by Mike Klein. Cindy Zeldin Interview with Cindy Zeldin, Executive Director, Georgians for a Healthy Future: “It’s a big victory for Georgia health care consumers. We have big problems in our state. We have two million that don’t have health insurance.  We have consumers don’t… View Article
By Mike Klein Mike Klein, Editor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Governor Nathan Deal expressed displeasure with the U.S. Supreme Court decision on federal health care reform during a Thursday afternoon news conference, describing it as “the largest tax increase in the history of the United States, at least $500 billion and perhaps significantly more.”  The Governor also admitted he was surprised by the decision because he thought the Court had given “pretty strong signals” that it had problems with the individual mandate. The Governor appeared alone when he spoke to reporters and a large crowd that assembled in mid-afternoon inside the State Capitol.  Deal said the state will likely hold off making decisions on several questions until after the November… View Article

Checking Up on Health

By Benita M. Dodd June 5, 2012 Benita M. Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation – Doomed to failure: Health insurance exchanges required in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) won’t work, won’t increase access to affordable health care, and won’t improve health outcomes or increase value, according to a new Galen Institute study. The paper by Rita E. Numerof, Ph.D., entitled, “What’s Wrong with Health Insurance Exchanges,” explains the problems states will face if they go down the path of creating PPACA health insurance exchanges. The exchange requirements will result in the creation of administrative behemoths that will limit individual choice and drive up costs, just the opposite of their intent. Numerof describes in detail why… View Article
By Mike Klein Medicaid is a beast.  About one-in-five Georgians receives Medicaid health care.  That is 1.7 million people.  Fifty-nine percent of statewide births are Medicaid babies.  Another couple hundred thousand children are enrolled in PeachCare, the state children’s health insurance program.   Medicaid could grow by hundreds of thousands more if the U.S. Supreme Court upholds the federal health care reform law in its decision expected next month. Not at all surprisingly, Medicaid redesign questions were abundant when three of Governor Nathan Deal’s advisors met with Georgia Children’s Advocacy Network members at the Freight Depot in Atlanta.  The advisors made no presentations and took questions for almost 90 minutes. Health policy advisor Katie Rogers named telehealth reimbursement policies, portable electronic… View Article

Checking Up on Health

Health Policy Briefs: May 1, 2012 Compiled by Benita Dodd Health care reform in remission: If it seems to you that health care policy is in limbo, you’re right. Most legislatures and policy-makers are adopting a wait-and-see attitude. Everyone is waiting for the U.S. Supreme Court ruling on the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. Nowhere is that more evident than in Georgia, which has seen no action and little interest after a law passed last year that would allow health insurers in Georgia to sell insurance policies from other states. The flexibility was expected to make health care coverage more affordable for Georgians. Writing for Georgia Health News, Andy Miller notes:… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation bases its findings on fact, and maintains the standard of truth.

U.S. Attorney General Griffin Bell more quotes