Tag: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Medicaid Expansion: Hand Up or Handcuff?

By Ronald E. Bachman Medicaid has several components, but at its core it is a federal-state partnership to provide a health insurance program for the poor. Although states’ programs can differ, most provide for those below the poverty level. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act required that states expand Medicaid to those earning up to 138 percent of the poverty level (about $25,000 for a family of three). The U.S. Supreme Court ruled, however, that each state can accept or reject the federal expansion of Medicaid. Like other states, Georgia had to make that choice, and Gov. Nathan Deal is refusing to expand Medicaid. “I think that is something our state cannot afford,” Deal told reporters.” And even though… View Article

Checking Up On Health: January 29, 2013

Benita M. Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd Glossary for the health care law: The Associated Press has helpfully compiled a list of explanations of the terms you should know to help you understand the law that Congress passed (to paraphrase Speaker Nancy Pelosi) so that it could find out what was in the law. For example: “Essential health benefits – Basic health benefits that most health insurance plans will have to cover starting in 2014. They include office visits, emergency services, hospitalization, rehab care, mental health and substance abuse treatment, prescriptions, lab tests, prevention, maternal and newborn care, and pediatric care.” Find out about individual mandates, exchanges and more.… View Article

Checking Up On Health: January 22, 2013

Benita M. Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd The trials of running clinical trials: About 89 percent of clinical trials meet their enrollment goals but 48 percent of trial sites miss enrollment and timeline goals, according to the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development. About 90 percent of drugmakers and research organizations use conventional methods such as physician referrals and mass media advertising to enroll participants. Considering how many of us use WebMD and Google to diagnose our ailments, it’s a real surprise that only 14 percent of these organizations use social media, online data mining and electronic health records to recruit participants. … In a related View Article
By Albert Woodard Hurricane Sandy is only the most recent reminder that natural disasters, from earthquakes and floods to tornadoes and wildfires, don’t discriminate and will lay waste to homes and schools as well as crucial businesses including doctor’s offices, clinics and hospitals.  These disasters take a terrible personal and economic toll. The nightmare of lost medical records, however, can put patients at immediate and life-threatening risk, not only during the disaster but for weeks and months afterward. Incidents of permanent record loss occur frequently because the United States lags behind other countries in the use of a technology that can prevent it – electronic medical records (EMRs). With a study by Munich Re, the world’s largest reinsurance firm, predicting… View Article

Checking Up On Health: January 15, 2013

  Benita Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd So much for individual responsibility: Merrill Matthews, resident scholar at the Institute for Policy Innovation, has two articles that should be of concern to every American about to be walloped by the mandates in the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act:  One, in Forbes magazine, notes that employers have been sent “an IRS warning that any efforts to avoid the ObamaCare mandate to provide coverage or pay a penalty (or is it a tax?) will not go unpunished.” The notice refers to “proposed regulations providing guidance under section 4980H of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) with respect to the shared responsibility View Article

Checking Up On Health: January 8, 2013

  Health Policy Briefs Compiled By Benita M. Dodd  Benita Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Happy New Year!   What if you don’t want Medicare? That’s too bad, according to the U.S. Supreme Court, which on Monday turned away a challenge from former House Majority Leader Dick Armey and other Social Security recipients who say they have the right to reject Medicare in favor of continuing health coverage from private insurers. Without comment, the justices let stand a federal appeals court ruling that held that there is no way for people who receive Social Security to reject Medicare benefits. Armey, a Texas Republican, and two other former federal employees say private insurance covers more than Medicare. Two other plaintiffs… View Article

Checking Up On Health: December 18

    Benita Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd The fault lies in our genes: Normal, healthy people are walking around with a surprisingly large number of mutations in their genes, according to researchers. It’s been well known that everyone has flaws in their DNA, though, for the most part, the defects are harmless. It’s been less clear, however, just how many mistakes are lurking in someone’s genes. Researchers analyzed the DNA of 179 people from the United States, Japan, China and Nigeria who had volunteered to have their entire genetic blueprints deciphered through the 1,000 Genomes project. Now, in a paper appearing in the American Journal of Human Genetics, the… View Article

A Child Nods to Health Reform

  Ronald E. Bachman, Senior Fellow, Georgia Public Policy Foundation By Ronald E. Bachman (With thanks to E.A. Poe’s, “The Raven”)  Once upon a weekday dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, My youthful brain was being fair, to learn about ObamaCare, While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of someone gently rapping, rapping at my bedroom door, “Tis some visitor,” I thought, “Tapping at my bedroom door – Only this and nothing more.” Then a Spirit came over me, as I dreamed of liberty, Could I keep my Doctor Seuss, my baseball cap, my Mother Goose? And with my needs could I be sure, that my doctor would have a cure For complex ills and… View Article

Checking Up On Health: December 11, 2012

Benita Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd Americans are living longer, with fewer deaths from heart disease and cancer, but more chronic illnesses, according to the 2012 America’s Health Rankings. The report highlights troubling levels of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and sedentary behavior. Medical advances are allowing more people to live with those conditions. Americans “are living longer, sicker” with more chronic illness, says Reed Tuckson of the United Health Foundation, a not-for-profit foundation that sponsors the report with the American Public Health Association and the Partnership for Prevention. Where did Georgia rank among the states? No. 36. No. 1 was Vermont; tied for the bottom of the… View Article

Checking Up On Health: December 4, 2012

Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd Benita M. DoddVice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation And then what? The American Medical Association reports that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid will raise Medicaid payments to primary care physicians to 100 percent of Medicare rates for the calendar years 2013 and 2014. Nationally, Medicaid’s average payment rate for physician services is just two-thirds of what Medicare pays. States will receive an additional $11 billion to cover the additional payments. OB/GYNs and emergency room doctors will not receive a pay increase. (In Georgia, 52 percent of births were covered by Medicaid in 2010.)   You WILL be well: With wellness programs becoming such an important tool in managing long-term health benefit costs,… View Article

The Foundation always tells the truth.

Governor Roy Barnes more quotes