Tag: Mike Klein

Teaching the Teachers How to Teach with Technology

By Mike Klein MIKE KLEINEditor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Georgia school doors re-opened this month which means the serious business of Friday night football looms near.  On the academic side, the battle to achieve something greater than statewide mediocrity punctuated by occasional points of light resumes anew.  But there also is another mission underway, one that could potentially remake the teaching profession. “We cannot send our student teachers into classrooms, expect them to blend, expect them to know what to do without having (technology) preparation,” says Jo Williamson, associate professor of instructional technology at Kennesaw State University.  “We cannot send graduates to (public) schools that are our clients and expect them to retrain them.” Last year Governor Nathan Deal appointed… View Article

Friday Facts: July 12, 2013

July 12, 2013  It’s Friday!  The Legacy of Hank McCamish On June 30 Georgia lost a great leader and a great man. Henry F. “Hank” McCamish Jr. was born and raised in Greenwood, SC, but after graduating from Georgia Tech in 1950 he never left Georgia.    A successful career as an entrepreneur allowed him to become a generous philanthropist. His leadership and gifts impacted countless charitable organizations and his guidance and mentorship influenced countless lives. Hank founded the Georgia Public Policy Foundation on October 29, 1991. He had two simple instructions: 1) Always tell the truth and make sure your facts are correct and 2) Focus on the issues and do not attack individuals. Humble throughout his life, nearly all… View Article

Friday Facts: May 31, 2013

May 31, 2013  It’s Friday! Tuesday is the registration deadline for the Foundation’s June 6 Leadership Breakfast, “Customize The Class,” 8 a.m. at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. Michael B. Horn, co-founder and executive director of the education practice at the Clayton Christensen Institute, will share how innovation can disrupt the factory-based education system and transform learning into a student-centric approach where all students can achieve their full potential. ($25.) Find out more at http://tinyurl.com/okoy4ad; register at http://tinyurl.com/7ldaqnk. Quotes of Note “The point to remember is that what the government gives it must first take away.” – John S. Coleman, address to the Detroit Chamber of Commerce, 1956 “Let’s count the flaws in the View Article
By Mike Klein Mike KleinEditorGeorgia Public Policy Foundation Youngsters are curious creatures.  They will engage in new styles of learning with excitement.  Technology enabled classrooms to create a seismic shift in the teacher-pupil relationship.  Smart boards replace dumb black boards.  Tablets replace books.  Students stacked in rows learning the same lesson has begun to shift toward pupils on personalized learning tracks with teacher participation rather than teacher domination.  Therein is the big challenge; how do you get the adults on board? “At the teacher level, it is a huge paradigm shift,” says Matchbook Learning founder and CEO Sajan George, who developed his model after spending years designing corporate – style turnarounds of big city schools that have the worst academic… View Article

Friday Facts: May 24, 2013

May 24, 2013  It’s Friday!  Have you shared the Friday Facts with your friends and colleagues yet? Invite them to sign up on our home page for their own copy! Quotes of Note “We cannot continue to bombard the people in Washington, telling them they need to cut spending, they need to reduce the burden on taxpayers in this country by reducing their expenditures, and then when something like sequestration occurs, be the first to complain we’re not receiving as much federal money.” – Nathan Deal, Georgia governor “The story of America’s quest for freedom is inscribed on her history in the blood of her patriots.” – Randy Vader Events June 6: Michael B. Horn, co-founder… View Article
By Mike Klein Mike KleinEditorGeorgia Public Policy Foundation Georgia’s track record as a low-tax, pro-business, pro-growth state is absolute.  However, the state has been unable to enact an important threshold – elimination or at least a sizable reduction in the 6 percent maximum personal income tax rate – and that prevents Georgia from being considered at the top of states that have low-tax, pro-growth fiscal policies. Today the American Legislative Council released its sixth annual “Rich States, Poor States” economic competitiveness index report that evaluates states on 15 fiscal policy sectors including tax rates, state regulations, right-to-work laws and size of the public workforce as a percentage of statewide population.  The ALEC formula rewards low-taxing, low-spending states, of which Georgia… View Article
(Editor’s Note: Matchbook Learning founder Sajan George discusses proven ideas to upgrade learning at the Foundation’s May 23rd Leadership Breakfast.  Click here for details.) By Mike Klein Mike KleinEditorGeorgia Public Policy Foundation Imagine this scenario:  An automaker prepares to launch a new car amid much fanfare.  The car launches to modest immediate success and then it flops.  This is a real story.  The Ford Edsel was an epic failure because Ford was wearing blinders in its commitment to the Edsel.  Had the company listened to consumers it would have known that auto owner tastes were changing and the Edsel was no longer what people wanted.  Edsel was the wrong car at the wrong time. It’s all about data.  Business has… View Article
Louisiana Court Rejects Funding Formula; Texas Lawmakers Reject Choice By Mike Klein Mike KleinEditorGeorgia Public Policy Foundation This week’s Louisiana Supreme Court opinion that struck down a school choice funding formula finds the usual suspects who want to prevent families from using their tax-paid dollars to send their children to the schools of their choice.  As we saw in Georgia, people who stand in opposition to expanded school choice believe the money belongs to them, which is a big brother knows best mentality. Some Louisiana background:  The state was in education chaos before Hurricane Katrina swept through eight years ago.  The unanticipated blessing from that life changing hurricane was that it gave the state, communities and families an opportunity to… View Article
By Mike Klein Mike KleinEditor. Georgia Public Policy Foundation This idea is almost too obvious:  Fix families and you might alleviate pressure on overburdened state justice systems as there might be fewer folks showing up in juvenile and adult criminal courts.  This week the Campaign for Youth and Justice echoed that idea in a new report that states: “Given the history of the juvenile justice system, which has historically kept families at arm’s length, coupled with organizational and fiscal challenges facing agencies today, it is not surprising that many justice systems are struggling to meet the needs of families.” The Family Comes First executive summary further states that despite legitimate efforts to improve outcomes, “what has been missing is a… View Article
Published May 3, 2013 By Mike Klein Mike KleinEditor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation One of the primary architects of the special council recommendations that became the basis for this year’s juvenile justice reform legislation says the primary reason that thousands of juveniles enter the legal system each year is because they come from dysfunctional families. “Most of the kids we’re seeing today in most courts are kids in which we have broken families, most of them have single parents, most of those are mothers and there are poor or very weak problem solving skills, not just among the young people but also their parents,” Clayton County Juvenile Court Chief Judge Steven Teske told the Georgia Public Policy Foundation this week.… View Article

To have an organization dedicated to the study of the problems that face Georgia in a bipartisan way….is absolutely one of the finest things that’s happened to our state.

The late W. H. Flowers, Jr., Chairman, Flowers industries, Inc. more quotes