Tag: Medical Malpractice

Guide to the Issues: Medical Malpractice

Principles:  Medical malpractice reforms should accomplish the following goals: Reduce the rates of preventable patient injuries. Promote open communication between physicians and patients. Ensure patients have access to fair compensation for legitimate medical injuries. Reduce liability insurance premiums for health care providers. Recommendation:  Replace Georgia’s current expensive and ineffective malpractice system with one thatreduces medical errors, enhances patient access to fair compensation for legitimate medical injuries and lowers liability insurance premiums for health care providers. Facts: The current approach to medical errors is failing: Expensive: Billions of dollars are wasted each year on “defensive” medicine, unnecessary procedures and tests ordered to protect health care providers in case of a lawsuit. Ineffective: There is “scant evidence that tort liability… View Article

Short Session Shouldn’t Keep Legislators From Reforms

By KELLY McCUTCHEN KELLY McCUTCHENPresident, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Their sights may be set on the looming election season and campaigns, but a reluctance to rock the boat is no reason for Georgia legislators to keep 2014’s short legislative session in the doldrums when there are opportunities to move forward on policy in Georgia. With the exception of criminal justice, Georgia has left public policy innovation to states like Florida, Indiana and Louisiana. With income tax, pension and major education funding reforms pushed to 2015, tort reform could be the issue that puts Georgia in the national spotlight. Sen. Brandon Beach’s Patient Injury Act would eliminate medical malpractice litigation. Democrats and Republicans alike acknowledge shortfalls in the current medical malpractice… View Article

A New Approach to Medical Malpractice Reform

By Kelly McCutchen KELLY McCUTCHENPresident, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Preventable medical errors kill more people in the United States each year than automobile accidents or guns. Billions of dollars are wasted each year on “defensive” medicine – unnecessary procedures and tests ordered to protect health care providers in case of a lawsuit. Instead of focusing on reducing medical errors, however, Americans are trapped in a system based on a false sense of access to justice that thwarts efforts to improve patient safety. As one paper put it, “The current tort system does not promote open communication to improve patient safety. On the contrary, it jeopardizes patient safety by creating an intimidating liability environment.” This quote is not from a conservative… View Article
By Joanna Shepherd-Bailey Jennifer Shiver knows what it means to not only be a young widow, but a widow with two young boys to be raised on her own. The Cumming mother is among thousands of silent victims of medical malpractice each year who are either harmed by a doctor or lose a family member due to medical negligence. When Jennifer’s husband died from complications from a botched bariatric bypass surgery, her life only got worse when no lawyer would take the case. As a result, she received no compensation from her husband’s death and has struggled to raise her family. The lawyers said they just couldn’t make enough money off the case. Many know the current medical liability system… View Article
By Kelly McCutchen   Kelly McCutchen, President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation New Census Bureau data ranks Georgia’s poverty rate as third highest in the nation. Combined with the state’s next-to-last ranking in personal income growth over the last decade, this is cause for concern. Georgians can either be distracted by divisive class warfare or focus on breaking down the barriers to economic opportunity.  Transportation is a good place to start. Transit should focus first on giving the poor and disabled access to jobs and education. That requires an affordable transit network that matches the “everywhere to everywhere” commuting patterns of metro areas that developed in the age of the automobile. Education is the best pathway to opportunity. Nothing should stand… View Article

Caps on Damages Won’t Reduce Defensive Medicine

The recent health care debate has completely ignored one of the major health care cost drivers: defensive medicine. Writing in The Hill, Dr. Jeff Segal states why the Affordable Care Act will do little to reduce healthcare spending: One reason, according to Gallup, is that one in four healthcare dollars in America is spent on defensive medicine. Defensive medicine occurs when doctors order more tests and procedures — such as CT scans, blood work and biopsies — than are medically necessary to keep from being sued. This costs consumers as much as $650 billion annually. In Texas, 79 percent of physicians said they practice defensive medicine compared to 81 percent in all states. This despite comprehensive legal reform adopted… View Article

Time to Replace the Medical Liability Tort System

By Richard L. Jackson Have you ever been to the doctor and suspected him of ordering a test just to cover his bases, not because you actually needed it? Anyone who has worked with doctors, nurses and hospitals over the years knows it happens and understands that this practice of “defensive medicine” is a major cost driver. Defensive medicine – doctors ordering unnecessary and typically expensive tests, treatments and procedures to avoid malpractice suits and litigation – is a major contributor to still-skyrocketing health care costs. These tests, of questionable clinical value, add up to as much as $650 billion each year, according to a poll of physicians. In Georgia alone, the amount is an estimated $13.25 billion. That’s money… View Article

The Foundation raises issues of importance above political rhetoric to a point where politicians focus on them and ultimately make quality decisions.

U.S. Representative Johnny Isakson more quotes